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THE 

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

PRESENTED BY 



.G£arge-Kleine- 
1929 



Scanned from the collection of 
David Pierce 



Coordinated by the 
Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproject.org 



Funded by a donation from 
John McElwee 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/exhibitorsherald08exhi 



t vm 



CHICAGO, MARCH 22, 1919 



No. 13 



111 



1 



Rllli 



Urn 



L lke dixdefieixdent 
film Jradejafier 



Goldwyn 
Pictures 

brought something 
newer, something 
finer, something 
better to the motion 
picture screens of 
the world 

GOLDWYN PICTURES CORPORATION 

Samuel Goldww Protiotant 

16 East Street New York City 



irrrr 



■ 



1 



, 1 1 



Mi 



m 



ILISHEP WEEKLY 



M A R T 1 X J . Q V 1 C I. E Y . PUBLISH E R 



iO. DEARBOKX ST. Entered as second class matter. August io, ;pi/, at the Post Office at Chicago, III., under the Act of March, .;. WJV. 



l>A7i I'd 



ESSANAY-CHAPLIN REVIVAL 
IS SWEEPING THE COUNTRY 

Read what this great New Yorfy Daily Says: 



All the great 
first run 
theatres and big 
circuits are showing the 
Essanay-Chaplin Revivals 
to packed houses, including 
The Rialto and The Rivoli 
of New York, The Marcus 
Loew Circuit, Jones, Linick 
and Schaefer, Asher Bros., 
Lubliner and Trinz and 
The Stanley Booking 
Company, with their 
hundreds of theatres. 



THE WORLD: MONDAY. FEBRUARY 24, 1919 




FILM PLAYS j 
REVIVED AT RIALTO " 



"A Night at the Show" Taxes 
Capacity of Theatre— New 
Bill at Rivoli. 



The management of the Rialto 
Theatre yesterday began the reviv&i 
of a series of film comedies made by 
Charlie Chaplin several years affo and 
considered not only the most popuHr 
of his films but the most typical of 
Chaplin's skill in cofriedy. and pan- 
tomime. That it is a popular move 
was shown by the crowds who stood 
£nd ■waited outside tilt theatre. A.1 
m,ost any time during- the afternoon 
and evening there was a line in front 
of the Rialto. 

"A N'ight at the Sliow" v*as the 
Chaplin film, and the spectatois 
seemed to enjoy it a* much as when 
it was first producer!- The rest of the 
programme etribri w 1 




i th 
! CI 



TRY TO GET EARLY RELEASE DATES AND 
TELL YOUR PATRONS YOU HAVE ALL FOUR 



"A Night in the Show 
"Shanghaied" 



"The Bank" 
"Police" 




1333 Argyle St., Chicago 




George Kleine System, Distributors 
Representatives at all General Film Exchanges 



KXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



is 



One of the Digest &*ne* from 

MUi b functus 

Greatest Melodtatna 



$&im Invelope 



NO melodramatic 
feature, irrespec- 
tive of costly star 
or costly production, 
surpasses in any detail 
the big box office power 
of this Bluebird play, 
"THE SEALED ENVELOPE." 

IF you paid triple the rental of 
this Bluebird you positively 
couldn't get a finer picture, 
nor with more suspense or won- 
derful dramatic action. WE AD- 
VISE YOU TO BOOK THIS PLAY FOR 3 DAYS 
LONGER. Your crowds will grow with each show- 
ing. GO TO IT STRONG. 

BOOK THRU ANY BLUEBIRD 
EXCHANGE 



7 



3 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

Action Contrasts to Tickle the Fans 




H 



ERE'S Blinkey Deal and his pal, 
Mazie, pulling a blackmail scheme 
Roger. Outside in the hall 



on 



Marie, the maid, is frantic. She had 
innocently lured him into the trap. And 
the night before, when Roger knew her 
only as a beautiful, mysterious girl, 
wonderfully gowned, he had led her 
proudly from the great ball room after 
Mazie had shrieked to the throngs that 
she was a thief. 

Just below you see how Roger finds 
her. Your audiences will like this novel 
situation wherein Roger tries to reconcile 
his night-time visions of her soft, velvet 
hands, her warm, tender smile and regal 
beauty with her day-time garb and toil 
as a hotel maid. 




These are scenes from 
the second of the NEW 
Anita Stewart Productions. 




WARNING 

All of my recently pro- 
duced Pictures are 
bein£ released through 
the First National 
Exhibitors Circuit, Inc 



LOUIS B. MAYER 

— presents — 

ANITA STEWART 

— in — 

"A MIDNIGHT 

ROMANCE" 

A Lois Weber Production 




A "First National" Attraction 



ELLE OF NEW YORK 

pled from Ihe musical play by (Jusiaue Kerker and Hugh Morion. 
Directed bv Julius Sieger 




The Los Angeles crowds defied the influenza, they 
braved the rains, they simply couldn't keep away. 
Week after week they jammed Quinn's Theatre. The 
wonderfulness of the picture spread like wild'fire 
and for eight solid weeks they held them out. 

Directed bu KINQ W. VIDOR A BRENTWOOD PRODUCTION 



ROBERTSON -COLE 

75 cleaned tAroi/6h c ° M p A N Y 

^ c 3 DIVISION OF FILMS 

EXHIBITORS MUTUAL ^TpESES 



WHAT EVERY WOMAN WANT/ 



featurin* 

Gir>ac* Barmond. 



Pre^erv/ted by 
JE/XE P. HAMPTOIsT 




MUTUAL 



ROBERTJ"OM - COLE. COMPANY 
DIVISION OK FILMJ 1 
BAN KE.RJ' and EXPORTERS 

for, the: producer 



Conceived with the 
intention of cre- 
ating a timely 
subject which 
would permit the 
exhibitor to in- 
crease prices 
extend engagements 
exploit unusually 
attract new 
clients, advertise 
novelty, over show 
his competitor and 
please his 
patrons . 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 
possesses every 

element of the 



WHOM 

THE 

GODS 

WOULD 
DESTROY 



special feature. 
It is timely. 
It is histori- 
cally vital . 
It is poignantly 
romantic . 
It has plots 
aplenty . 
It is lavish. 
Its sets are 
magnificent . 
Its cast is superb 



WHOM 

THE 

GODS 

WOULD 
DESTROY 

Was made to set be- 
fore the world the 
benefits of a 
society of nations. 
It does so in vivid 
and sensational 
form . 

It is a connected 
story of vast 



It was directed by interest. 

It is suspenseful 

a genius . 
It was produced 

by a a successful | the theatre can 



It is of the 
screen. A subject 



studio master . 
It is the most 
timely subj ect 
ever conceived and 
comes at a time 
when every living 
man, woman and 
child is reading, 
talking or writing 
about a league of 
nations . 



show with pride 
and which will en- 
tertain as it 
startles and en- 
thralls. The 
rivers of the world 
are swollen from 
the tears of the 
bereaved . 
Little wooden 
crosses dot the 
lands of Europe 
like the sands of a 
desert . 



Golden service 
stars are silent 
tributes to our 
own heroes . 
Woodrow Wilson ' s 
ideals of a per- 
manent league for 
peace is the great- 
est story subject 
in the world and it 
has been made the 
subtle background 
for the tense 
virile 

entertaining 
human document 
which comes to the 
screen soon under 
the title of 



WHOM 

THE 

GODS 

WOULD 
DESTROY 

which is under the 
auspices of 

MACAULEY 
PHOTOPLAYS 

INC. . 

516 5th AVENUE 



8 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




C >\ real false 
Face, that any. 
body can wear 
Make your 
whole town 
talk about 

Thos H.lnce s 
the Talse Faces 

Rush Your Order 



To Help Crowd Your Theatre An Extra Day 

-THOMAS H. INCE'S Paramount-Artcraft Special "The False 
A Faces" has been a triumph in the big first run theatres. Soon 
the smaller ones will be "cleaning up" with it. 

Here's an accessory that will help make this big production even 
a bigger money maker. 

A post card that is a full-colored false face — with holes for the 
eyes to see through, a die cut nose so that anybody can wear it. 

The card is 5% inches long by 3% wide — longer than this line 
of type. The price is $7.00 a thousand. You pay the express. 

A novelty that will set the whole town talking. And when you 
show this Thomas H. Ince Production, they'll all be there! 



Don't overlook this chance to set new 
box office records for your theatre 



m% FAMOUS PLAYERS - LASKY CORPORATION 



* ADOLPH ZUKOR ;v 

» jSkictures <**i( 




Accessories Department 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp.. 485 St'i Ave 
New York City 

{Check ) 

Here is j Money ^ for $ f„ which send 

m thousand False Face Post Cards 

@ $7.00 a thousand, F. 0. B.. A' ra . York. 

Name 

Theatre 

Address 



I c Jear it out ! Never mind the scisso rs!^ 



9 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

READY SOON FOR RELEASE 

THE SOMETHING NEW YOU'VE BEEN WAITING FOR 




A Tense Dramatic Moment from "Khavah. 



ALICE HASTINGS and GIACOMO MASUROFF 

IN — — — 

SHOLOM ALEICHEM'S 

(Jewish Mark Twain) 

Masterpiece 

KHAVAH 

In 5 Reels 

Direction of Charles E. Davenport 



The JUive Wi re Exhibitor cannot afford to miss booking this picture 

STATE RIGHT BUYERS ATTENTION 

Write — Wire — or Phone 

1400 BROADWAY ZION FILMS, INC. NEW YORK CITY 

PHONE GREELEY 3992 
10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



200 DAYS PLAYED 

EACH DAY TO A NEW RECORD 

WHAT OTHER PHOTO PLAY CAN EQUAL 
THIS SHOWING IN THE FACE OF 

RAIN — SNOW STORMS — BLIZZARDS 

MACK SENNETT'S MASTERPIECE 



MICKEY 



Chicago: Mar. 3, 1919 

Mickey Film Corp. 
Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen : — 

I played "MICKEY" for two 
days and I can truthfully assure 
you that my patrons were more 
pleased with this production than 
any picture ever shown in this 
theatre. It is a sure winner afc 
the box office. 

Very truly yours, 

LANE COURT THEATRE 
H. M. Rouda, Mgr. 



Bookings Now Being 
Arranged for the 
State of Illinois 



Mabel _ 
yiormana 

Wickey" 



IS 

DOING 
ALL THIS 
AND MORE 

Chicago, Feb. 24, 1919 




Mickey Film Corporation 
220 S. State St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen : — 

Since opening my house I have 
never had the pleasure of handling 
so many people as I did on your 
production "MICKEY." I never 
ran any picture over two days, 
but could not accommodate the 
crowd on your picture, after run- 
ning it it four days. Am con- 
sidering a return engagement. 

"MICKEY" is everything that 
is desired in the feature line and 
I sincerely hope that all your 
patrons will meet with the same 
success that I did. 

Yours very truly, 

WILSON THEATRE 
L. Natelson, Manager. 



S MICKEY FILM CORP. 

CHICAGO 404 Consumers Building ILLINOIS 



PHONE: 
Wabash 373 



11 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




NEW ANNUAL 

Subs criptions to 

EXHIBITORS HERALD & MOTOGRAPHY 

were received in week 
ending Saturday, March 8 



The HERALD is the 

trade paper wide-awake 
exhibitors buy — and read 



Books and accounts of the HERALD are open 
to advertisers for verification of this statement. 

12 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

PLAY A WINNER ! 



GEORGE WALSH 

in. 



Never Say Quit 




Editorial, Cqmmbnt ot the WMk 

by MartinJ- QttiGi^y 



THE nickel show, generally speaking, has ceased 
to be a legitimate exhibition enterprise. It is 
economically unsound, a disappointment to the 
public and a disgrace to the industry. 

The motion picture has long since passed the 
nickel stage. That portion of the public, however, 
which lias the bargain limiting craze may for a time 
be attracted to the hall of the exhibitor displaying 
the worn-out 5-cent sign. But at the same time the 
motion picture is being humiliated and unwarranted 
inroads are being made into the business of the 
theatreman who is asking a legitimate price and in 
return is giving a legitimate show. 

The 5-cenl theatre can only exist today l>v Mini- 
flaming- its public with unfulfilled promises, with 
films that have reached the junk stage and physical 
surroundings that arc a menace to the health and 
welfare of the public. 

Although he may not realize it. the short-sighted 
distributor who is catering to this type of business 
is only cheapening the reputation of his pictures and 
lowering the value of them to the legitimate ex- 
hibitor who pays a fair rental price and asks a fair 
admission price. 

The small revenue to be gained from this business 
does not justify the action of the standard distributor 
in entering into competition with the junk exchange. 



AARON J. .MIXES whose name has been con- 
spicuously identified with many notable ad- 
vances in the exhibition business, declares 
himself for indefinite runs. Mr. .(ones recognizes 
that the run of an important picture should not 
altogether he determined by some pre-arranged 
schedule which frequently results in a picture being 
removed from a theatre at the very time thai it i> 
swinging into its greatest popularity. The new policy 
provides for greater exploitation effort upon a picture 
of promise and then the plan of installing it in a 
theatre for an indefinite run. the closing date to be de- 
termined entirely by the attitude id' the public. 

This policy has been asserting itself for sonic time 
and constitutes a big step forward. It is a logical 
plan and gives indication of excellent results for the 
theatre, the distributor and the public. 



IS there any limit to film rental? The answer 
seems to he "no,'' when we consider the fee of 
•$1(1,000 for a week's run on Chaplin pictures at 
a New York theatre. Analysis of the question seems 
to register the conclusion that the lowest possible 
rental fee is too high if it prohibits the exhibitor 
making a substantial profit. While, inversely, a fee 
that might seem to be the top limit is quite within 
reason if it insures the theatre man a real profit. In 
other words, the vital consideration is not the rental 
price of a picture, but the volume of patronage the 
picture itself attracts. 

OCT of the debris of the old exhibitors' league 
in Chicago there has been born the Illinois 
Exhibitors' Alliance, based on a constitution 
which eliminates the possibility of autocratic rule 
and the subversion of the organization to the in- 
terests of a few by the introduction of the commission 
form of management. 

With the pressing needs for organization and com- 
bined effort apparent on every side the future of this 
organization is one of promise. The fairness and 
equity of the scheme of management which has been 
adopted should insure the enthusiasm and active co- 
operation of every member. 

* * 

THE music tax niu>t be fought and opposed 
from everv angle until the combination is dually 
crushed. The demand of the music publishers' 
combination is without equity or reason. The music 
publish r in handing the exhibitor music to he played 
for the purpose of boosting sales and later coming 
along with a demand for tribute is assuming an un- 
reasonable position ami one which be musl eventually 
yield up. 

Music is published for the possibility of profit in 
sales to the public. The exhibitor in playing a selec- 
tion in his theatre renders full remuneration in ad- 
vertising. The attempt to make him pay is an il- 
legitimate bit of side graft thai should not lie 

tolerated. 

The exhibitor doe- not need the taxable music and 
in declining to pla\ it will eventualh make the music 
publisher beg a hearing in the lihn theatre. 

Yielding to 'his tax at this time 
higher charges later on. 




15 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

47S960 ^ 

astor, Lenox and 




NEWS OF THE WEEK 

Chicago Exhibitors Form New Association 17 

Exhibitors Renew Effort to Repeal Tax on Film 
Rental 18 

Penn Theatres Are Energetic in Fight on 1794 
Blue Laws 18 

Hotel Running Films in Basement; Exhibitors 
Voice Protest : 19 

Pennsylvania Showmen ( hganizing to Battle 
Politicians 19 

Redfield Explains Need of Government Encour- 
aging Films 20 

' )hio Exhibitors to Seek Local Option on Sunday 
Opening 20 

New York State Well Organized to Bring About 
Sunday Opening 21 

Trade Gossips Over Abrams' New Move 21 

hinds Censorship Big Question 22 

Talmadge Sisters and Alice Brady Starred on 
Select's March Program 24 

Robertson-Cole Brentwood Five Reel Pictures 
for Program 24 

Goldwyn's Easter Special Is on Way to Branch 
Offices 26 

Grossman Wins Suit Over Octagon Films Stock- 
in New York 26 

H. B. Warner Is to Be Presented in Greatly 
Diversified Offerings 27 

Macauley's Photoplay Announced ; Required En- 
tire Year to Complete 28 

Sawyer and Lubin Back in New York and Hard 
at Work 28 

Fox Company Declares "Salome" Biggest Suc- 
cess in Its History 29 

Special Novelties Furnished Exhibitors for 
"False Faces" 30 

Universal Will Make Strong Bid for Export 
Business at Once 31 

Reviews 

"Put Up Your Hands," America C-D, five parts, 
with Margarita Fisher 33 

"What Every Woman Wants," Exhibitors Mu- 
tual D, five parts, with Grace Darmond 33 

"The Forfeit," Powell-Hodkinson D. five parts, 
with House Peters 33 

"A Fight for Love," Universal D, six parts, with 
Harry Carey 33 

"The Marriage Price," Artcraft D, five parts, 
with Elsie Ferguson 33 

"A Gentleman of Quality." Vitagraph D, five 
parts, with Earlc Williams 34 



"The Wicked Darling," Universal D, five parts, 

with Priscilla Dean 34 

"A Man and His Money," Goldwyn C-D, five 

parts, with Tom Moore.'/.-. 34 

"Satan, Jr.," Metro C, fi ve parts, with Viola 

Dana 35 

"Partners Three," Paramount D, five parts, with 

Enid Bennett 35 

"Love and the Law," Sherry-General D, six 

parts, with Glen White 35 

"When Men Desire," Fox D, five parts, with 

Theda Bara 35 

"Crook of Dreams," World D, five parts, with 

Louise Huff 35 

"Poor Boob," Paramount C-D, five parrs, with 

Bryant Washburn 35 

"The Wild Goose-Chase," Triangle D, five parts, 

with Hazel Daley 35 

Departments 

The Cutting Room 23 

Heraldgrams 38 

Exhibitors' Bureau 39, 40 

What the Picture Did for Me 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 

Canadian Film News 47, 48 

Chicago Trade Events 49, 50 

Calendar of Program Publications. . . .52, 53, 54, 55 
The Open Market 55, 56 

Advertisers 

Bee Hive Exchange 38 

Bluebird Photoplays 3 

Burke & James, Inc 57 

Walter T. Braun 58 

DeBerri Scenic Company 58 

DeVry Corporation 58 

Essanay 2 

Eastman Kodak Company 57 

Exhibitors Supply Company 58 

First National Exhibitors' Circuit 4 

Fox Film Corporation 13 

Famous Players-Lasky Corporation 9 

Fiat Laboratory 57 

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation 1 

Afacauley Photoplays, Inc 8 

Mickey Film Corporation 11 

National Poster & Printing Company 58 

Pathe Exchange, Inc 60 

Tom Phillips 57 

Rothapfel Unit Programme 12 

Robertson-Cole Company 6, 7 

Select Pictures Corporation 5 

A Teitel 57 

Zion Films, Inc 10 



Volume VIII 



MARCH 22, 1919 



Number 13 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Chicago Exhibitors Form New Association 

Members of M. P. E. L. Decide to Drop Old Cognomen and 
Start Anew — Illinois Exhibitors' Alliance Springs Into Being 
at Meeting to Decide on Commission Form of Government 

Exit the old League — enter the new. 

The Illinois state branch of the Motion Picture Exhibitors' 
League of America, the second oldest body of motion picture 
men in America, passed out of existence last Friday afternoon 
and a new league took its place. 

The name of the new association, which promises to become 
a potent factor in the film industry, is the Illinois Exhibitors' 
Alliance. 

The new affiliation is unique in several respects. It will be 
governed by a commission of twelve exhibitors, chosen from 
among its members and its activities will not be confined to the 
city limits of Chicago but will embrace the whole state. 



The movement to establish a new and 
independent organization was started 
some time ago by members of the old 
league and the final action was taken at 
a regular meeting of the M. P. E. L. 
held in Fraternity Hall on Adams street, 
Friday afternoon, March 7. At this 
meeting it was decided to put the old 
league away among the moth balls and 
start anew. A state-wide canvass is to 
be made for members and already a large 
number of prominent exhibitors have 
signified their intention of joining the 
I. E. A. 

The new league will have its head- 
quarters in the Century building, corner 
State and Adams streets, formerly oc- 
cupied by the M. P. E. L., and it is 
proposed to hold weekly meetings of 
the board of commissioners these. One 
•commissioner will act as president or 
chairman each month and they will 
serve in' alphabetical order throughout 
the year, no person being allowed to 
act as chairman twice in one year. 

Officers to Serve 

A permanent secretary, treasurer, busi- 
ness manager and sergeant-at-arms will 
serve throughout the year. 

The Illinois Exhibitors' Alliance will 
be for those whose activities in the mo- 
tion picture industry are confined ex- 
clusively to the exhibition of motion 
pictures. 

It is the purpose of the new associa- 
tion to secure protection by coopera- 
tion for the exhibitor members, to raise 
the standard of pictures offered for ex- 
hibition; prevent breaches of contracts 
of whatsoever nature, secure reasonable 
and equitable film rentals; fair insur- 
ance rates and protect exhibitors against 
adverse legislation. The new league 
will adjust all labor troubles and pro- 
mote good fellowship among its mem- 
bers. 

As Chairman Joseph Hopp expressed 
it: "We are to begin right now to show- 
that we are determined to have clean 
pictures produced by actors and actresses 
-whose characters are beyond reproach." 

Initiation Fees and Dues 

The initiation fee for membership in 
the Alliance is $10 and the dues are to 
be one dollar a month, payable quar- 
terly in advance. A fund to be used for 
protective purposes and legal advice will 



also be raised by an assessment of one 
dollar a month from each member. 

The new association, which is the out- 
growth of a suggestion made some time 
ago by Samuel Atkinson, manager of 
the Hoyburn theatre, Evanston, that 
the management of the exhibitors' league 
should be placed in the hands of a com- 
mission, rather than be ruled by a presi- 
dent chosen to serve for a long term, 
was heartily endorsed by a large num- 
ber of exhibitors attending the M. P. 
E. L. meeting. 

The most important parts of the con- 
stitution of the newly formed Alliance 
follow: 

ARTICLE 1. NAME. 

The name of this organization shall he the Illi- 
nois Exhibitors' Alliance. 

ARTICLE 2. OBJECT. 

Sec. 1. The purposes of this organization are to 
secure protection by cooperation, to raise the 
standard of motion picture films and the motion 
picture business generally, to secure fair and equi- 
table treatment from all with whom we have busi- 
ness transactions, to prevent breaches of contracts 
of whatsoever nature, to secure reasonable insur- 
ance rates, to secure protection against adverse 
legislation, to adjust difficulties with labor, to pro- 
mote the spirit of good fellowship in all lines of 
the business, to adjust minor matters of impor- 
tance to the exhibitor, and to further the best 
interests of all members of the Association and 
the public in general in all matters pertaining to 
the exhibitors' business. 

ARTICLE 3. MEMBERSHIP. 
Sec. 1. The membership of this organization 
shall be composed only of members whose activi- 
ties in the Motion Picture industry shall be con- 
fined exclusively to the exhibition of motion pic- 
tures. 

Sec. 2. (A clause to the effect that the initia- 
tive, referendum and recall will be applied, is to 
be incorporated here.) 

Sec. 3. Any owner or owners of a theatre 
employing a manager and wishing to join the Asso- 
ciation may have said manager act as his or their 
proxy, provided the same action shall be taken as 
required in Section 2 of this article. Such proxy 
shall be in writing above the owner's signature; in 
case of a corporation it shall bear the signature of 
the president and secretary of the corporation^. 

Sec. 4. Anyone who is a member in good stand- 
ing in the Association and who disposes of his 
motion picture theatre interest, may retain his 
membership so long as he conforms to the consti- 
tution and by-laws of the Association. 

Sec. 5. All members not in good standing at 
least ten days prior to the annual election of offi- 
cers are not eligible to vote at such election. 

ARTICLE 4. INITIATION FEE, DUES, 
ARREARS. 

Sec. 1. The initiation fee shall be $10, accom- 
panied by $3 as dues for the first three months, 
both to be payable at time of making application 
for membership, which shall be promptly refunded 
in case applicant is rejected. The dues shall be 
$12 annually, payable quarterly in advance the 

17 



first meeting in January, March, June and Sep- 
tember. 

Sec. 2. In addition to said initiation fee and 
dues each member shall pay into the organization 
one dollar per month, payable quarterly in ad- 
vance. Such moneys to be set aside and held for 
contingencies and protective purposes. 

Sec. 3. No member of this Association whose 
dues are three months in arrears shall be entitled 
to vote or a voice and shall not be eligible to sit 
in closed meetings until the dues are paid. When 
a member is three months in arrears for his dues, 
the secretary shall notify him by mail at his last 
known place of residence, or theatre, and if same 
is not paid within 14 days after the notification be 
suspended from the Association. 

Sec. 4- The secretary shall at the first meeting 
held each quarter read the names of all delin- 
quent members. 

ARTICLE 5. COMMISSIONERS. 
Sec. 1. The business of the organization shall 
lie administered by a board consisting of twelve 
members, to be known as commissioners. 

Sec. 2. Said commissioners shall be elected 
from the floor of the body and hold office for 
twelve months. 

Sec. 3. The Chairman of said Board of Com- 
missioners shall be elected monthly in alphabetical 
order, no one commissioner to be allowed to serve 
twice in twelve months. 

ARTICLE 6. MEETINGS. 
Sec. 1. Regular meetings of the Association 
shall be held the first Friday of each month at 12 
o'clock noon, sharp. Twenty members shall con- 
stitute a quorum at all meetings except the annual 
meeting, which will require a one-half vote of the 
entire membership. 

Sec. 2. Special meetings shall be called at the 
option of the Board of Commissioners, or upon the 
written request of five members. 

ARTICLE 7. ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 
Sec. 1. The annual meeting of members for the 
nomination and election of Commissioners for the 
ensuing year, the reading of the annual report of 
the secretary and treasurer, anl for such other 
business as may properly come before the meeting, 
shall be held at 12 o'clock noon on the regular 
meeting day in February of each year. Should 
such day be a legal holiday then such election will 
be held at 12 o'clock noon on the first following 
Friday. 

Sec. 2. All members entitled to vote must be 
present in person and cast their own vote. 

Sec. 3. All Commissioners shall be elected by 
secret ballot. The twelve candidates receiving the 
highest number of votes shall be declared elected. 

Sec. 4. Commissioners elected at such annual 
meetings shall take office at the following regular 
meeting. 

Sec. 5. The officers of the Association shall be 
a chairman of commissioners, secretary, business 
manager, treasurer and strgeant-at-arms. 

(Continued on page 18) 

piiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiili i iimitiiiiiminniimrainuiminpniiuuuuuiiiHiiiiti iniiuin^ 

| Reads Them All, but 

Calls "Herald" Best j 

THE LYRIC THEATRE 
L. A. Haglund, Mgr. 
Sweet City, Iowa 
1 To EXHIBITORS HERALD \ 
| AND MOTOGRAPHY: 

Enclosed find check for sub- j 
| scription to your valuable paper. § 
| / have seen them all and consider | 
1 your paper the one best bet for § 
1 the exhibitors, and ALL LIVE j 
| EXHIBITORS CANNOT AF- | 
| FORD TO BE WITHOUT IT. j 
Respectf ally yours. 
Lyric Theatre Company, 
(Signed) L. A. Haglund. 

liiii:ii!iiiiiniiiiniiiiiii!imiilllllllimmilliniiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiimiiiimiitimnnimiuiiii^ 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHV 



Exhibitors Renew 
Effort to Repeal 
Tax on Film Rental 

Dispatch from Capital Says 
New Movement May 
Be Successful 

WASHINGTON, D. C— It is believed 
that one of the things to be -taken up 
earliest when Congress again gathers in 
Washington will be the repeal of tin- 
rental tax on motion picture films. Con- 
tinued efforts have been made to secure 
the repeal of this tax, a resolution hav- 
ing been offered in the House of Rep- 
resentatives by Congressman Lundeen 
of Minnesota for that purpose just before 
the session ended. Because of the short 
time left the Congress and the great 
amount of important legislation before 
it, no action was taken in the matter, 
but the campaign to secure the repeal of 
this section will be resumed as soon as 
Congress again meets. 

The tax is contained in the new rev- 
enue act as Section 906, and provides: 
That on and after the 1st day of May. 
1919. any person engaged in the business 
of leasing or licensing for exhibition 
positive motion picture films containing 
pictures ready for projection shall pay 
monthly an excise tax in respect to car- 
rying on such business equal to 5 per 
centum of the total rentals earned from 
each such lease or license during the 
preceding month. Tf a person owning 
such a film exhibits it for profit he shall 
pay a tax equivalent to 5 per centum of 
the fair rental or license value of such 
film at the time and place where and for 
the period during which exhibited. If 
any such person has, prior to December 
6, 1918, made a bona fide contract with 
any person for the lease or licensing, 
after the tax imposed by this section 
takes effect, of such a film for exhibition 
for profit, and if such contract does not 
permit the adding of the whole of the 
tax imposed by this section to the 
amount to be paid under such contract 
then the lessee or licensee shall, in lieu 
of the lessor or licensor, pay so much 
of such tax as is not so permitted to be 
added to the contract price. The tax 
imposed by this section shall be in lieu 
of the tax imposed by subdivisions (c) 
and (d) of Section fiOO of the Revenue 
Act of 1917. 

Lehrman Indicted 

In Film Mystery 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— Henry Lehr- 
man. former manager of the Sunshine 
Comedies. Inc.. a Fox Film Co. branch, 
and Charles Hochberg, also a former 
employe of the company, have been 
jointly indicted on charges of larceny 
and embezzlement, in connection with 
the disappearance of a $35,000 film from 
the Fox studio. The two men furnished 
bail in the sum of $2,500 and were re- 
leased. Both Lehrman and Hochberg 
will contend that the disappearance of 
the film is a civil matter and not crim- 
inal, according to their attornev, Milton 
M. Cohen. The film, entitled "The Bell- 
hop's Millions." mysteriously disappeared 
several weeks ago. The facts as learned 
by the district attorney's office were laid 
before the grand jury and the indict- 
ments returned. 




h it A \K KKKN \ \ 
In hi* dressing room chatting with Harry 
Friend of Chicago Tribune. The I'nthc 
star I* popular with the newspaper 
in i* ii everywhere 



Penn Theatres Are 
Energetic in Fight 
On 1794 Blue Laws 
Enlist Philadelphia Orches- 
tra to Assist in Winning 
Over Legislature 

1 1 ARRISBURG, PA., March 10.— So 
keen has become the controversy over 
the Rorke bill, now before the state leg- 
islature, which is designed to amend the 
blue laws of 1794 so that concerts, lec- 
tures and motion picture shows of an 
educational nature can be legally held on 
Sundays in Pennsylvania, that the entire 
Philadelphia Orchestra, one of the finest 
musical organizations of America, has 
sought and obtained permission to give 
three concerts at as many hearings be- 
fore the law and order committee of the 
House, in three different cities of the 
state, as an argument for the proposed 
more liberal Sabbath regulations. The 
object is to convince the members of the 
law and order committee, to which the 
bill was referred, as well as the legis- 
lators in general, that the kind of music 
the orchestra would play could in no 
sense be regarded as desecrating the 
Sabbath. 

The motion picture interests of the 
state have been strongly favoring the 
adoption of the Rorke bill, but the church 
folk have been decrying the measure 
in the harshest terms. Roth sides will 
be represented at the hearings which, 
according to the tentative dates set, will 
be held as follows: Philadelphia, March 
10; Pittsburgh, March 17, and at the Cap- 
itol in Harrisburg, March 19. 

The Zook bill, which would extend 
from June 1. 1920. to June 1, 1925, the 
date by which all motion picture and 
other theatres must be on the ground 
level, alreadv has passed first and second 
reading in the House and is expected to 
reach the governor's office for his sig- 
nature within two or three weeks. 



FORM NEW ASSOCIATION 

(Continued from page 17) 

Article 8, which defines the powers, and duties 
of officers, specifies that the Chairman of Com- 
missioners shall preside at all meetings and repre- 
sent the Association on all occasions where provi- 
sion is not otherwise made. A vice chairman act- 
in his absence. 

This article also defines the duties of the secre- 
tary-business manager, the treasurer, the sergeant- 
at-armg and the Board of Commissioners' duties. 
The latter comes under Section 0, which reads as 
follows: 

The Board of Commissioners shall be the super- 
\ ising body when the organization is not in session 
and it shall meet regularly at 1 p. m. every Tues- 
day at the Association headquarters. Should a 
Tuesday be a legal holiday then the meeting shall 
take place the following day. Eight members of 
the board shall constitute a quorum. Special 
meetings of the Board of Commissioners may be 
called by the chairman. Any member of the board 
who is absent three consecutive meetings (sick- 
ness or unavoidable absence from the city ex- 
cepted) his office shall automatically be declared 
vacant ami his successor elected at the next regu- 
lar meeting of the Association. The Board of 
Commissioners shall elect one of its members as 
chairman as .hereinbefore provided, and one as 
treasurer, and he shall make a report at each 
regular meeting of the Association. 

Articles 9, 10 and 11 cover the expulsion of 
members, amendments and the order of business 
of meetings. 

Before adjournment members of the 
new Alliance expressed themselves upon 
the proposed "double-barrelled" censor- 
ship bill now before the Illinois State 
Legislature. A strenuous effort will be 
made to defeat the Buck measure as the 
exhibitors generally are opposed to 
censorship. They, however, favored 
the state-wide bill if it will wipe out 
all local censorships, as the lesser of 
two evils. 

A letter has been drafted by the sec- 
retary of the I. E. A. which will be sent 
to every alderman in the city of Chi- 
cago, as well as every state legislator, 
to ascertain where each one stands in 
the matter of censorship. 



j^ind Stolen Films 

Louis T. Rogers, New York exchange 
manager of Paramount, returned yester- 
day from Wilkes-Barre, Pa., where Wal- 
ter S. Casterlin of the Sterling Theatre. 
Wilkes-Barre, was held for grand jury 
inquiry next month. Rogers declares 
that a print of "Snow White," one of 
"The Love Mask" and prints belonging 
to World and Triangle were found in 
Casterlin's possession, which were ob- 
tained by him from salesmen who stole 
them. 



Wally Van Is Host 

NEW YORK. — Wally Van. director 
general of the Rothapfel Picture Com- 
pany, held a buffet supper .and dance 
reception in the Bacon-Backer studio on 
Friday night which was to celebrate the 
completion of the first Rothapfel pro- 
duction. Leading" members of the trade 
and press attended. Mr. Van was con- 
gratulated on every side for the splen- 
did efforts he has made in this picture 
to keep away from the mediocre. 



Asks Job for Yanks 

J, M. Loughborough, captain of the 
77th Division, asks all motion picture 
men to give employment preference to 
returned soldiers. He especially appeals 
for positions for the 77th Division vet- 
erans. His, address is 280 Madison ave- 
nue. New York. 



IS 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Hotel Running Films in Basement; 
Chicago Exhibitors Voice Protest 

Terrace Garden Cabaret Enjoys Privilege Denied 
To Others Despite Protest From Fire 
Prevention Bureau 

Chicago, the scene of the Iroquois theatre fire, the most disastrous 
theatre conflagration in history, is permitting film exhibitions in a 
basement cabaret. 

The following story describes a situation which is not only a 
menace to the public welfare but unfair competition which should 
be vigorously opposed. 

An inquiry has been instituted to determine why the Morrison Hotel, 
Chicago, under the management of Harry C. Moir, is permitted to exhibit mo- 
tion pictures in a basement amusement hall of the hotel. 

The HERALD has received a large number of complaints from exhibitors 
who claim that the hotel exhibition is unfair competition. Exhibitors further 
assume the position that a lire due to a film explosion, or any cause, might 
result in a disaster which would have a serious effect upon the theatrical busi- 
ness generally in the city. 



Pennsylvania Show 
Men Organizing to 
Battle Politicians 

Four Bills Aimed at Industry 
Brings United Action 
From Trade 

PITTSBURGH, PA.— Politicians of 
Pennsylvania will cease to use the mo- 
tion picture industry a*, a target and ex- 
hibitors of the state as the goats of all 
kinds of freak legislation, petty graft and 
continual annoyances, if theatre owners 
of the state rally to the support of the 
newly formed American Exhibitors' As- 
sociation. 

Four bills, aimed at the very heart of 
the industry in this state, were intro- 
duced at the present session of the leg- 
islature and the organization of the new 
association is the exhibitors' answer. 

A Bundle of Brickbats 

In addition to the new censorship law, 
it is proposed to place a tax of one cent 
per foot on all film released in the state; 
regulate the admission of children under 
sixteen years of age, and place a state 
license of $500, $400 or $300 on all the- 
atres. 

Responding to a call from J. E. Smith. 
Chris Vollmer and Henry Poke, exhib- 
itors of the Pittsburgh district, met at 
the Idle House Theatre, Pittsburgh, 
February 23, and completed the organi- 
zation of the new association. 

Similar organizations in other parts of 
the state are already in the process of 
formation. Within a few weeks, it is ex- 
pected that the theatre owners will be 
able to present a solid front against the 
politicians — not only smashing into the 
four bills hitting their business, but take 
an active part in passing a Sundav open- 
ing law. Fred J. Herrington, a hustler, 
has been selected as secretarv; James E. 
Smith president; Chris Vollmer. vice- 
president, and H. E. Kliehm, treasurer. 

The Prominent Members 

Among the members of the organiza- 
tion are: J. C. Smith, Smith Theatre. 
Pittsburgh: Walter Artzberger, Penn 
Theatre, Pittsburgh; Fred Ahlborn, 
Garrick Theatre, Garrick, Pa.: A. H. 
Berg. Berlin Theatre, Duquesne, Pa.; 
W. J. Kane, Midway Theatre. Pitts- 
burgh, Pa.: Lawrence Theatre, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa.: H. B. Kester. Cameraphone 
Theatre, Pittsburgh; George Logue. Eve- 
line Theatre, Pittsburgh; Oliver McKee. 
McKee Theatre, St. Clair, Pa.: Henrv 
Foke, Shiloh Theatre. Pittsburgh: D. T. 
Powell. Pastime Theatre, Pittsburgh; 
Fred Cho'ier, Dome Theatre, Pittsburgh; 
Richard Tones. Climax Theatre Pitts- 
burgh; F. B. Tones, Rowland Theatre. 
Wilkiusbur<>\ Pa.; I. W. Shearer, Wilbur 
Theatre. Pittsburgh; Fred M. Smith. 
Falcon Theatre, Glassport, Pa.: W. L. 
Thomas, Casino Theatre, Greensbiirg, 
Pa.: H. A. Victor, Victor Theatre. Mc- 
Keesport. Pa.: Chris. Vollmer. Idle Hour 
Theatre, Pittsburgh; Jacob Kaiser, West 
End Theatre, Pittsburgh: F. T. Norring- 
ton. Coliseum Theatre. Mt. Oliver, Pa., 
and Henry Cauding, Lincoln Theatre, 
Pittsburgh. There has been many appli- 
cations turned in the past week, among 
whom are the following; A. Peltimo're, 
Strand Theatre. New Castle Fa.: Alix 
L. Moore, Pastime Theatre. South Side, 
Pittsburgh: Frank Wanonolis. McKees- 
nort, Pa.; M. G. Naute, Grand Theatre, 
Train. Pa. 



The hotel company recently inaugu- 
rated the policy of film exhibitions in a 
basement amusement hall called the Ter- 
race Gardens. The basement room, of 
course, is surrounded with none of the 
safeguards against panic and disaster in 
case of a fire which are required in the 
case of all theatre buildings. The ex- 
hibitions are a part of a cabaret enter- 
tainment. This has never been allowed 
elsewhere and permits have repeatedly 
been refused by the city authorities for 
film shows in restaurants and in other 
places not constructed along the line of 
regular theatre buildings. 

Constant Danger of Panic 

Casual observation of the Morrison 
Hotel's basement show hall revealed the 
fact that in case of fire or accident ot 
any other nature at a time that the place 
was crowded would in all probability re- 
sult in a panic as the exits are not ar- 
ranged in a manner to facilitate the 
emptying of the place. Also exit from 
the hall is under the same difficulties that 




II \ltlO MOI DIM. 

\\ <m u) I'miM'd iiiimiciifv expertf w ho ims 
*iuii4>ii ii iim^ term contract With 
PamoiiH Playrm-Lnsk} 



usually attend removal from basement 
rooms. 

Mr. Moir, manager of the Morrison 
Hotel, is reputed to wield considerable 
political influence. This fact is generally 
being given as the reason he has been al- 
lowed to operate a theatre proposition in 
a basement. 

The city ordinances governing theatres 
and setting forth fire prevention regula- 
tion explicitly prohibit motion pictures 
being exhibited in such a place as the 
Terrace Garden. 

An inquiry conducted by the Herald 
reveals that the fire prevention bureau 
opposed the issuance of a theatre license 
to the Terrace Gardens. Later Mr. Moir 
sought a writ of mandamus and after 
encountering only a half-hearted opposi- 
tion on the part of the authorities he ob- 
tained the desired permit. 

Heyda Opposed License 

"We refused to approve the application 
of the Terrace Gardens for a theatre 
license," said Charles Hevda, chief of the 
fire prevention bureau. "The lawsuit was 
carried on without consulting us. I was 
against granting the license and still am. 
The Garden is an unfit place for the ex- 
hibition of films." 

In addition to his hotel interests. Mr. 
Moir operates three small loop theatres 
in Chicago. 



Injunction Is Sought 

To Protect Countess 

NEW YORK. --A injunction is 
sought In the supreme court here to pre- 
vent the showing of $ film which con- 
tains a subtitle "Bernstorff and his 
American wife, who were engaged in 
murder and other crimes in the United 
States." 

The injunction is asked by friends of 
Countess von Bernstorff. \vlrt> claim the 
subtitle is doing her a great injustice. 



Majorie Rambeau Weds 

NEW YORK. — Majorie Rambeau. who 
recently divorced Charles W. McLaugh- 
lin, known on the stage as W'illard Mack, 
was married to Hugh Dillman Mc- 
Gallghty, an actor, here. 



19 



EXHIB/TORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Redfield Explains 
Need of Government 
Encouraging Films 

Pictures Necessary to Garry 
U. S. Products Into 
Foreign Countries 

WASHINGTON, D. C— Declaring 
that the motion picture film is one of the 
most potent forms of advertising, Secre- 
tary of Commerce, Redfield, appearing 
last week before the committee on inter- 
state and foreign commerce of the House 
of Representatives, urged that a large ap- 
propriation be made at the next session 
of Congress to be expended by the de- 
partment in exploiting American prod- 
ucts in foreign countries by this method. 

The Secretary told the members of the 
committee that showings of a large num- 
ber of commercial films in China had 
proven very satisfactory. The Chinese, 
he pointed out, are noted for their desire 
to see things for themselves, rather than 
accept what is told them, and by showing 
them the actual process of manufacture 
in motion pictures more was accom- 
plished for American manufacturers in 
that market than could have been done 
by any other means. 

Other Countries Precede Us 

Other countries have preceded us in 
this work, he declared, notably England 
and Canada, the former having used this 
method as far back as 1913. "The Ca- 
nadian government, through its depart- 
ment of trade and commerce," he said, 
"has been using motion pictures on a 
large scale, having expended for nega- 
tive films and motion pictures since Feb- 
ruary 6, 1918, some $40,000. The govern- 
ment plans to exhibit pictures through 
exchanges, at lectures before boards of 
trade, rotary and Canadian clubs, and in 
schools. Films are loaned lecturers 
without charge, and are also supplied to 
foreign trade agents and to the Lyon 
Exposition. 

"It is interesting to note that owing to 
the great success of the use of motion 
pictures in the Province of Ontario, the 
Provincial legislature during the spring 
session of last year granted $52,000 for 
the extension of the work. 

Discuss Allied Industries 

"One of the aggregations of business 
men banded together to seek export 
trade under the beneficial Webb law is 
the Allied Industries of New York, of 
which the du Pont people are among the 
founders and at the head. This organ- 
ization is the combined selling agent of 
some sixty of our most considerable in- 
dustries. It expects to represent over 
200 manufacturers and, together with the 
Allied American, Inc., of Chicago, an- 
other similar concern, has not only been 
constant users of motion pictures, but 
has donated industrial films for use 
among the Y. M. C. A. at home and 
among our soldier boys abroad. 



New Indiana Corporation 

MARTON, IND.— The Mecca Theatre 
Company, a new concern, filed articles 
of incorporation with the county re- 
corder. The capital stock is given at 
$10,000, four hundred shares at a_ par 
value of $25 each. The business of the 
incorporation consists of the buying, 
selling, owning of motion picture the 
atres. The incorporators are William 
Howard Swanger, Joseph P. Murphy. 
Tames S. Hawkins and Hartley McClain. 



When Is a Re-Issue 
Not a Re-Issue? — 
Ask Capital Film Co. 

The question of attempted mis- 
representation is being raised in 
connection with announcements of 
the Capital Film Company of In- 
dianapolis. 

The Capital is the rather mys- 
terious company which the well- 
known Ike Schlank recently caused 
to dawn upon the horizon of the 
film business and to which the 
HERALD made casual reference 
in a recent issue. 

The Capital Film Company an- 
nounces a series of short features 
with such well-known stars as 
Bryant Washburn, Beverly Bayne, 
Charles Ray, Dorothy Gish and 
Francis X. Bushman. The trade, 
of course, knows that these play- 
ers are not making pictures for the 
Capital Film Company. 

The explanation is to be found 
in the fact that the Capital Com- 
pany has merely arranged for a list 
of reissues of old one and two reel- 
ers that have passed through the 
General Film Company in the years 
gone by. 

No mention of "reissues," how- 
ever, is made in the announcement 
of the company. 



Jewels Recovered 

Following Accident 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y— The City 
Fathers of the "Queen City of the 
Sound" have been spending much more 
time in their own baliwick of late than 
has been their previous custom, owing 
to the fact that Virginia Pearson, while 
riding in a recalcitrant automobile 
skidded on the slippery car tracks on 
Main street, and spilled Virginia, to- 
gether with the Bishop's jewels, into the 
midst of the main thoroughfare. The 
fire department, street cleaning depart- 
ment, police and patrol were called into 
immediate action. 

It was reported that Miss Pearson did 
not lose a nickel in this unfortunate ac- 
cident so far as the jewels were con- 
cerned, owing to the honesty of the City 
Fathers, who saw to it that each and 
every gem was returned to her, and have 
been trying to restore to her the health 
which she lost in hitting the pavement 
so hard. 



Returns From War 

Muriel Ostriche was a very happy girl 
this week when her brother, Major 
Thomas J. Brady, returned with the old 
Seventh Regiment, and as Muriel put it, 
she was "the happiest girl seeking rein- 
statement in the pictures." We wish 
both Tom and Muriel much success. 



Picture Is Withdrawn 

The Western of March 22, "A Prisoner 
for Life" has been withdrawn from 
the Universal program and will be re- 
placed with another two reel subject en- 
titled 'The Gun Runners." featuring Neal 
Hart. 



Ohio Exhibitors to 
Seek Local Option 
On Sunday Opening 
Clear Cut Statement Is Issued 
Explaining Reason 
For Move 

DAYTON, OHIO.— The Ohio State 
Screen League has adopted a clear cut 
statement of its stand on the proposed 
Sunday opening bill. 

It will not ask for a bill, legalizing the 
Sunday theatre in every city. It favors 
a local option measure, under which each 
community can decide the question for 
itself. 

The statement is as follows: 

The Ohio State Screen League stands squarely 
on two propositions. Neither it nor its members 
desire to open houses contrary to the public opin- 
ion prevailing in their communities. 

In Ohio it is definitely established that a few 
communities do not desire any exhibitions on 
Sunday. In many other communities it is equally 
clear that Sunday exhibitions not alone are pop- 
ular, but are a definite civic need. The popu- 
larity of the motion picture theatre as a place of 
resort for those desiring pleasure or relaxation is 
clearly established. 

The near approach of prohibition and the con- 
sequent abolition of the saloon emphasize the 
need of increased facilities for providing clean, 
wholesome entertainment at a low cost for the 
citizenry of the state. 

In congested industrial centers, such as Akron, 
Portsmouth, Piqua, Youngstown. etc., where a 
very large percentage of the population is engaged 
in industry for a fixed number of hours daily, 
there is a need for relaxation and pleasure which 
cannot be met without the motion picture theatre. 

Employers of labor are free to express the con- 
viction that unless their employes can be pleas- 
antly entertained during their free hours, it is not 
possible to secure the help desired. 

There are in the more congested areas of the 
state thousands of persons whose only approach to 
a home is a one-half or a one-third interest in a 
bedroom, which is occupied for the remainder of 
the time by some one other than themselves. 
Such persons must, for their moral and physical 
health, have places where they can be entertained 
at the minimum expense without danger to their 
moral or physical well-being. The motion picture 
theatre fulfills this condition as no other institu- 
tion at present known to the American people. 

The statement already has won many 
friends to the proposed bill, and it is ex- 
pected to carry. 

Pathe to Distribute 

For Virginia Pearson 

Announcement comes from Pathe Ex- 
change that Virginia Pearson Photo- 
plays, Inc., has chosen that organization 
as its medium of distribution. The new 
producing company will make six or 
eight pictures during the coming year, 
the first of which is "The Bishop's Em- 
eralds," adapted from Houghton Town- 
ley's famous novel by Frank Beresford. 
The other stories will be based on well 
known novels and plays and at least 
two stories specially written for the 
star by masters of modern fiction, an- 
nouncements of which will be made at 
a later date. • 



Begin Work on "Khavah" 

Work was begun during the current 
week on the initial production by the 
Zion Films, Inc., of the first Sholom 
Aleichem story, "Khavah," under the di- 
rection of Charles E. Davenport. The 
picture is in five reels and is being made 
at the Estees Studio on West 125th 
street, New York. 



?0 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



New York State Well Organized 

To Bring About Sunday Opening 

Thorough State Wide Drive is Instituted by 
Exhibitors to Secure Repeal of Obsolete 
Blue Laws 



NEW YORK. — A comprehensive pro- 
gram has been mapped out by the Legal 
and Legislative Committee of the Na- 
tional Association in co-operation with 
the New York State Exhibitors in the 
campaign to legalize Sunday opening in 
this state, which it is expected will be 
productive of big results. 

At a meeting of this committee held 
last week, Max Spiegel of the Strand 
Theatre Circuit, who is chairman of the 
Exhibitors' Publicity Committee, was 
present when plans were made for add- 
ing trailers to all publications in the 
state during the next few weeks and 
which are to be supplied by the pro- 
ducers. In addition to this, the news 
weeklies including Pathe, Universal, In- 
ternational, Gaumont and the Picto- 
graph, are incorporating some of the 
suggestions in each of their publications. 
Film Salesmen Organized 

A new feature of the committee's 
campaign will be the organization of 
tiie film salesmen in each of the districts 
of the state through the meetings which 
are to be held at central points, the first 
being held Sunday at the 48th Street 
Theatre. William A. Brady, president 
of the National Association, promptly 
offered the use of his 48th Street The- 
atre for this purpose, and was to have 
addressed the meeting, but was called 
out of town. 

Mr. Nathan Vidaver, chairman of the 
National Association's Committee, pre- 
sided and introduced Max Spiegel, 
chairman of the Publicity Committee, 
who outlined what is desired on behalf 
of the film salesmen, setting forth the 
plan for the campaign in which the rep- 
resentatives of the film companies who 
are in personal touch with exhibitors 
can render most valuable assistance. 

All of the distributing companies ar- 
ranged for their salesmen in the Metro- 
politan district to attend the meeting. 
It is also planned to hold similar meet- 
ings in Albany and Buffalo and possibly 
Syracuse, to be later determined. 
Campaign Is State Wide 

The Legal and Legislative Committee 
is distributing literature among the ex- 
hibitors showing them how to proceed 
with the organization of a local Sun- 
day campaign and offering various ideas 
and suggestions, which if followed 
should be of valuable assistance in con- 
nection with their efforts to legalize 
Sunday opening in this state. 

The National Association's Committee 
has_ undertaken to interest the civic, 
social and commercial organizations 
throughout the state in the Sunday bills, 



requesting that resolutions be adopted 
and sent to their representatives in the 
Senate and Assembly at Albany. 

Editorial commendation on behalf of 
Sunday opening is also being sought 
through the daily and weekly news- 
papers in each locality, and many strong 
editorials in support of Sunday motion 
pictures have been received during the 
past week indicating that the press is 
in entire sympathy with this movement. 

Men Directing Movement 

The activities of the committee are 
under the direction of Nathan Vida- 
ver, counsel for the World Film Corpo- 
ration, who is chairman, and Lewis 
Innerarity, secretary of Pathe, who is 
secretary of the committee. These of- 
ficers are cooperating in every way with 
Max Spiegel, chairman of the Pub- 
licity Committee for the State Ex- 
hibitors. 

The feeling is very general through- 
out the state in favor of local option 
Sunday motion picture legislation, and 
it is believed that the bills which are 
now pending before the Legislature at 
Albany will be passed at the present 
session and promptly signed by Gov- 
ernor Albert E. Smith, who has always 
advocated the legislation proposed. 



Fox and Sheehan Are 

On Way to Europe 

NEW YORK.— William Fox, presi- 
dent of the Fox Film corporation, Win- 
field R. Sheehan, general manager, and 
Abraham Carlos, general representative, 
are on the Aquitania bound for Europe, 
where they will spend considerable time 
planning a wide extension of Fox pro- 
ducing and distributing facilities. 

While abroad they will establish 
studios in France and England and 
strengthen the company's organization 
in both countries. If time permits, they 
will inspect the Balkan States with a 
view of extending the agencies for dis- 
tributing Fox pictures in Greece, Rou- 
mania, Bulgaria, Serbia, Albania and 
European Turkey. 



New Berth for Dench 

President George Julian Houtain an- 
nounces the appointment of Ernest A. 
Dench as special publicity representa- 
tive for the Gray Seal Productions, Inc. 



Plans $100,000 Theatre 

HARLOWTON, MONT.— Harry E. 
Ervin, a prominent oil and mining oper- 
ator, is planning the erection of a $100,- 
000 theatre in Harlowton. 




GEORGE WALSH 
la his latest Fox play, "Never Say <{ii<<. 
Florence Dixon is the pensive maiden. 



Trade Gossips Over 
Abrams , New Move 

Rumor Connects Paramount 
With United Artists 
Future Plans 

Announcement that two former offi- 
cials of the Famous Players-Lasky com- 
bination have been selected as general 
manager and assistant manager of the 
United Artists Distributing Company 
caused considerable speculation this 
week in trade circles. 

Hiram Abrams, former president of 
Paramount Pictures Corporation, has 
been named general manager and Ben- 
jamin P. Shulberg, former general man- 
ager : of Paramount, assistant general 
manager. 

Abrams apparently separated from 
Paramount some time ago, but there has 
been gossip from time to time that he is 
still bound to the Famous Player-Lasky 
companies. His acting as distributor 
for Mack Sennett's latest feature, "Yan- 
kee Doodle in Berlin" revived these ru- 
mors within the last few weeks. 

Mr. Schulberg a few days ago indi- 
cated an important statement would be 
forthcoming within the next fortnight. 



Business Good in Denver 

The Denver Theatre Supply, distribu- 
tors for the Nicholas Power Company, 
reports through its Mr. Claypole that 
business is in a very favorable condition 
and that the sales of Power's camera- 
graphs are very satisfactory. 



Musgrove Has "Flu" 

Harry Musgrove, general manager for 
the Australasian Films, Inc., who reached 
New York a few days ago, was taken 
seriously ill with the "flu." and is now 
con lined to his hotel. 



The Verdict Of Exhibitors: The Herald Reviews Are 
Independent And Dependable 



21 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



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FINDS CENSORSHIP BIG QUESTION 

Chicago Commission Is Compiling Mass of Data Which Will Be 
Invaluable to Entire Nation in Solving Problems 
in Connection With Motion Pictures 

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Starting in a modest way for the pur- 
pose of drafting a new censorship or- 
dinance for the consideration of the city 
council, the Chicago Censorship Com- 
mission investigation of the motion pic- 
ture problem, has developed into the 
broadest and most thorough yet at- 
tempted. 

Although its task is only half com- 
pleted, it already has collected a tremen- 
dous amount of valuable information 
given by people who have made an ex- 
haustive study of the matter, and it is 
certain that its report, vvhen published, 
is to be one of the standard reference 
books for states, municipalities and other 
bodies politic in considering the ques- 
tion. 

Find Many Important Angles 

The question of what in films is '•im- 
moral" has been found to be but one of 
many important angles. Medical spe- 
cialists, called before the commission, 
have turned the study to the effect of 
motion pictures on the growing child — 
his eyesight, nervous system, and men- 
tal development. 

School authorities have been called in 
to assist. Through it. the thousands of 
school teachers in Chicago have been 
enlisted and are now conducting a care- 
ful study of their pupils, with a view 
of returning invaluable statistics. 

The construction of theatres, projec- 
tion, advertising — even the production 
and distribution — have been discussed 
and considered. 

Behind it all is Chairman Timothy I). 
Hurley. Chicago attorney, who was in- 
fluenced to accept the chairmanship of 
the commission over his nrotest but, af- 



ter plunging in, has gone at the work 
with the usual Hurley thoroughness and 
efficiency. 

Mr. hurley tackled the juvenile delin- 
quency question in Chicago nearly thirty 
years ago and after twenty years of 
keeping continually at it. brought about 
a series of reforms, which have been 
adopted generallv throughout the coun- 
try. 

Hurley Is in to Finish 

"I am going to stay to the finish," he 
declared in discussing the censorship 
board, "It is a big question and a vital 
one. 1 bad no idea of its scope or im- 
portance when 1 started. Hut I am 
mightily pleased that I took it up and 
if our work is a materia! aid in solving 
this problem, 1 will feel well repaid." 

His only disappointment. Mr. Hurley 
said, has been the lack of cooperation 
on the part of motion picture producers 
who to date have neglected the oppor- 
tunity of presenting their ideas and 
theories to the board. 



An Old Selig Film 

"A Wild Goose Chase." an old Selig 
picture, featuring Hazel Daly, which 
was made by the Selig Polyscope Com- 
pany about a year and a halt ago, is just 
being issued on the Triangle program. 



First Feature on Way 

The first print of the Selznick Pictures 

production "Upstairs and Down." is 

headed for New York, and is expected to 

arrive in a dav or two. 



WEDDING FEAST FROM RUSSIAN PLAY, "KHAVAH' 





TIMOTHY l>. HURLEY 
Chairman of Chicago Censorship Commia- 
alon 

Sol Lesser Buys Big 

Mack Sennett Comedy 

(Special to the Herald) 

NEW YORK, March 11.— Sol L. Les- 
ser of San Francisco is reported to have 
purchased the entire United States rights 
to the Mack Sennett picture, "Yankee 
Doodle in Berlin." 

Hiram Abrams has been placed in 
charge of the sale of the picture. 



Oberholtzer Still at It 

JEFFERSON CITY. MO. — E. P. 
Oberholtzer, censorship evangelist and 
member of the Pennsylvania censorship 
board, threw on a screen before mem- 
bers of the Missouri legislature samples 
of "cutouts" made by his board. The 
show was staged in an effort to secure 
passage of censorship legislation for 
Missouri. 



In New Quarters 

Victor Kremer is now located in room 
603, Tilden building, 105 West 40th 
street, New York, and states that the 
bookings on "Denny from Ireland." 
"The Snail," "The Ranger" and "The 
Pen Vulture" are more than active. Mr. 
Kremer is greatly pleased with the re- 
sults obtained to date. 



Fairbanks Leases Studio 

According to Business Manager John 
Fairbanks, arrangements have been com- 
pleted for the leasing of the Clune studio 
in Hollywood as the future home of the 
Douglas Fairbanks productions for pub- 
lication through the United Artists' Cor- 
poration. 



Written i>> Bholom 4.1eichem and produced l*y '/.ion I'llms. Inc., this iiln.v tells the story 
of a JeweM who defied tin- lawn of Hie Talmud by marrying ■■> Christian. 



Players Form Union 

LOS ANGELES. CAL.— The motion- 
picture players' union, recently organized 
in this city, is the first of its kind in the 
country. It is affiliated with the Amer- 
ican Federation of labor. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 





1 

?; 
?! 
1 

1 
5] 

i 


THE CUTTING ROOM 1 

Editing the Excess Footage in the News and Publicity of the Week p 
Down to a Few Reels That Tell the Story Quickly — and With a Punch §j 

By THE * REPORTER 1 







Well Deserved Honor 
for Nazimova 

THE 'ANNOUNCEMENT THAT 
"Out of the Fog," a current Xazimova 
picture, was chosen by the National 
Board of Review for presentation before 
educators, editors and artists as a sam- 
ple of true artistry in pictures, is most 
interesting. 

Madame Nazimova is an artist of 'rare 
gift. She was an acquisition that the 
screen is just beginning to really valuate. 
The choice of her production for so sig- 
nificant an occasion is a well merited 
honor. But the vital point behind the 
whole incident is that the National Board 
of Review believes that this type of pic- 
ture is the most potent weapon to fight 
localized censorship, because they claim 
such censorship cannot help but restrict 
and stunt the development of the motion 
picture from an artistic standpoint. 
WHY CAN'T THIS IDEA BE CAR- 
RIED FARTHER AND EDUCATORS. 
ARTISTS AND EDITORS ALL OVER 
THE COUNTRY BE SHOWN PIC- 
TURES OF THIS TYPE AND CON- 
VINCED THAT THEIR PLACE IN 
THE CENSORSHIP FIGHT IS WITH 
THE INDUSTRY? 

Why let a good idea sprout only to 
wither in the space of a day? 

Oberholzer Gives Concrete 
Proof That Producers 
Should Clean House 

THIS HEADING DOESN'T MEAN 
I that the reporter loves Oberholzer; far 
I from it. But Oberholzer, censorship Bol- 
shevist and propagandist, backs up the 
statement I made on this page last week 
that the producers started the vicious 
I circle of censorship and that they noi 
the exhibitor would have to do the mis-J 
sionary work in unraveling the tangle. 
I For instance, the amiable secretary of 
the Pennsylvania board is quoted as say- 
ing that one producer is "ignorant and 
troublesome" and that his pictures with 
their salacious titles and unclean atmos- 
phere are the reasons why censorship 
must exist in its most virulent form. In 
other words, the very producers who 
denounce Oberholzer and bi^ ideas pro- 
vide him with the ammunition that helps 
to decrease the revenue from their and 
other's pictures. It's an absurd situa- 
tion and must end soon. 



The Percentage Basis 
and the "Big Four" 

THE STATEMENT COMING FROM 
the coast that the United Artists' Asso- 
ciation would only play their collective 
pictures on the percentage basis in the 
future is good news to the exhibitor and 
it's the best news the entire trade has 
had for some time. If the stars are over- 
rated, the percentage basis will kill them. 
If they are worth more money than they 
were getting, they will get it, and either 
way the exhibitor can't lose. If this idea 
goes through, there will certainly be 
some interesting fights in the larger 
cities when a big story picture playing 
percentage and a big star picture playing 
on the same basis compete. 
It will certainly breed a new section in 
the industry of "picture exploiters." 
Keen, merchandising men who know how 
to advertise and how to sell. Not house 
managers, but outside men who will do 
nothing but "sell" the picture and the 
methods used in exploiting each type 
of production should provide a very in- 
teresting contrast. 

A New Stunt in 
State Right Selling 

THERE'S NOTHING TO IT; WE'VE 
got to hand it to that chap Garson and 
his organization, file has ideas and 
they're out of the beaten track. He cer- 
tainly hasn't got a single track mind. 
Every one 1 remember said his Blanche 
Sweet picture, "The Unpardonable Sin," 
would not and could not go because it 
was a war picture, said some, and the 
star, said others. I remember the Ri- 
alto-Rivoli people turned it down. But 
Hut that didn't bother Harry, and his 
showing in the Broadway Strand, De- 
troit, week of March 3d, shows that he 
had no need to worry. Reports cover- 
ing the show till Wednesday night show 
receipts, it is claimed, of over $14,000. 

And This 
in Detroit 

But there is where Harry put it over 
right. He realized what every film man 
who has sold goods in the field knows 
and that is the fact that a Broadway 
showing means nothing to the country. 
In Detroit, however, you've got a bet- 
ter average, cross-section of the entire 
American public than in the big town. 



And I think other big cities would an- 
swer just as well; for instance, Cleve- 
land. But, of course, in Detroit Garson 
is playing on his home grounds and that 
counts. 

But getting back to the title. Producers 
of big specials for the state right mar- 
ket should note Mr. Garson's success in 
disposing of rights in Detroit because 
of the box office evidence he was able 
to bring forward. A hint should be 
sufficient. 

The Better Picture Idea 
Looms Up Again 

IT'S A HARDY P E R E X X 1 A L 
bloom, this slogan of "Fewer and Bet- 
ter Pictures," and it's with us again. 
Goldwyn — no, not the company, but 
Sam — tells us it will be his banner for 
the coming year and Shurtleff, recently 
a debutante in producing ranks, says he 
is going to fight for the same idea in 
his Jack London series. Let's hope they 
do. The move is right, but it can't 
stand up of its own strength. For in-, 
stance, distributors must sell the exhib- 
itor with the idea of longer runs and 
this, of course, presupposes the exist- 
ence of better pictures. And the exhib- 
itor must pay big money for the pic- 
ture for two reasons, so that he will 
think enough of it to go ahead and 
exploit it and also because the producer 
needs a big return to enable him to 
continue big production. It is another 
film cycle and every part is interdepend- 
ent. Several distributors are hammer- 
ing along on the above idea and notable 
among them is Pathe. In their new 
feature policy they are getting big pic- 
tures and selling them tor big prices, 
but THEY ENCOURAGE THE EX- 
HIBITOR TO RUN THEM A WEEK 
OR LONGER. 

And week run> need exploitation and 
big houses, so you see how it runs. 

Paramount at 
the Crossroads 

AFTEK MANY MOONS OF CON- 
jecture. the popular "dope" proved out. 

Irani s and Sehulherg are with the "Big 
Four." Now, then, what next? 
Is Paramount a repentant film Germany? 
Has this jjigantic organization realized 
the economic errors that caused it to 
lose the Big Four, or is it like Germany 

(Continued oh page 24) 



23 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



CO-AUTHORS OF "CRAIG KENNEDY 




Arthur B. Reeve John W. G rey 

Oliver Film, Inc. 



Talmadge]Sisters and Alice Brady 
Starredfon Select's March Program 



Select Picture Corporation's output for 
the month of March embraces three Star 
Series productions made by Norma Tal- 
madge, Constance Talmadge and Alice 
Brady. 

"The Probation Wife," in which 
Norma Talmadge is presented by Joseph 
M. Schenck, is by Angie Ousley Rooser 
and tells the story of a young girl whose 
early life finds her among the entertain- 
ers in one of the tenderloin's "show pal- 
aces." Norma Talmadge has the role 
of Joe Mowbray, the girl, while Thomas 
Meighan. her leading man, is seen as 
Harrison Wade, a man who offers to 
help }o". escape from her associates. 
Befort ,',he can grasp the opportunity, 
however, she is arrested, and spends the 
next two years in a girls' reformatory. 
Later she escapes, and through a stroke 
of good luck again meets Wade. 
Sydney A. Franklin, Director 

They are married, but for Joe there 
follows a period of probation which 
finally culminates, in one of the sweetest 
romances ever shown on the screen. 
The picture was directed by Sydney A. 
Franklin and the scenario was written by 
Kathryn Stuart. In addition to Miss 
Talmadge and Mr. Meighan, the cast 
includes Florence Billings, Alec B. 
Francis, Walter McEwen, Amelia Sum- 
merville, A. Brooke and S. Liston. 

Constance Talmadge's Select attrac- 
tion for March is "Experimental Mar- 
riage," in which she is presented by 
Lewis J. Selznick. It is a screen version 
by Alice Eyton of William J. Hurlbut's 
last season's Bijou Theatre success, "Sat- 
urday to Monday." 

In this picture Miss Talmadge is seen 
as Suzanne Fercoll, a young lady whose 
aspirations to political fame is over- 
shadowed by her love for Foxcroft Grey. 
Harrison Ford plays the latter role. The 
story itself is concerned with a proposed 



marriage agreement which shall bind the 
two only over the week-ends. The first 
trial appears successful, but the Goddess 
of Jealousy takes a hand and the original 
week-end plan proves to be a very un- 
satisfactory arrangement. It is directed 
by Robert G. Vignola. 

Alice Brady's Picture 
"Marie, Ltd.," Alice Brady's Select 
feature for March, is a story by Louise 
Winters with scenario by Jane Murfin. 
The story revolves about the fashionable 
millinery shop of "Marie, Ltd.," on Fifth 
avenue, and shows Miss Brady as Drina 
Hilliard, daughter of "Marie." Drina 
has been educated in the West, but later 
comes to New York, where she meets 
men who patronize her mother's shop. 
A shadow of trouble hovers over her 
mother when one of Drina's rejected 
suitors learns that Marie has been over- 
charging her patrons, but the trouble is 
adjusted through the friendly offices of 
Blair Carson, who has fallen in love with 
Drina. 

George Smith Touring 

Europe for Government 

George A. Smith, known throughout 
the film trade through his long connec- 
tion with the Pathe organization of 
which he was manager of serial sales, 
and who more recently has attained 
fame as a result of his work with the 
film section of the Department of Pub- 
lic Information, writes a Chicago friend 
as follows: "Spending ten days at Nice 
as Uncle Sam's guest. Visited Monte 
Carlo today." 

This would seem to indicate that Mr. 
Smith is making the rounds of the for- 
eign centers in the interest of the Film 
Division of the Department of Public 
Information. Friends of Mr. Smith are 
looking for his early return to the states 
and the resumption of his place as an 
executive with some of the big film dis- 
tributors. 



Robertson-Cole Buys 
Brentwood Five Reel 
Pictures for Program 

"The Turn in the Road" Is. 
Taken After Success at 
Los Angeles 

"The Turn in the Road" a rive reeL 
feature, which has just completed a run 
of eight weeks at (Juinn's Theatre, Los 
Angeles, surpassing all records at this 
house, was purchased last week by the 
Robertson-Cole Company, from the 
Brentwood Film Corporation, which pro- 
duced the picture. 

This production will be published 
through Exhibitors Mutual and will go 
out as a regular feature, not a special. 
It was written and directed by King 
Vidor, one of the youngest and most 
successful authors and directors in the 
California film colony. There is no 
featured player, but the cast is well 
rounded. 

Little Ben Alexander, the six-year old 
Los Angeles boy, who created much 
pathos and mirth in D. W. Griffith's 
"Hearts of the World," has a strong part 
in "The Turn in the Road." In fact, the 
story centers about him. 

Helen Jerome Eddy is "The Girl." 
June Barker. Miss Eddy has been lead- 
ing woman in a number of photoplay 
attractions, and for a long time played 
with George Beban. 

Lloyd Hughes is "the boy," Hamilton 
Perry. He was assigned to a difficult 
role. Pauline Curley, who has appeared 
in many Metro productions, plays Evelyn 
Barker. 

George Nichols and Winthrop Hall 
are others who have prominent parts 
in the enactment of the drama, not to 
the play will give the old, as well as the 
young, many pleasant moments. 



THE CUTTING ROOM 

(Continued from page 23) 

— defeated, but not crushed, and ready to- 
come back if given the chance? Para- 
mount is really today at an important 
crossroads. It can embrace the big story, 
big author idea and put it over in place 
of big stars. Some say the acquisition 
of the Mayfair product is the start of 
this work. Or P. A. can (let it be whis- 
pered) perhaps swing back the Big Four 
to all intents and purposes. 
It did it before, I am told, with Artcraft- 
And when is a good idea ever old? 
What shall it be? 
Turn to the right? 



Billie Rhodes Married 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. — Billie 
Rhodes, star for the Exhibitors Mutual, 
and Smiling Billy Parsons, the screen 
comedian, were married here a few days 
ago. It was a secret until Mrs. Parsons 
had to disclose her name in applying for 
a passport. 



Plans Poster Campaign 

Pathe Exchange, Inc., has decided to 
undertake a great poster campaign for 
the Ruth Roland serial "The Tiger's 
Trail." which will be published on April 
30. 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

It is Not What a Film Costs But What it Pays 
A LITTLE STORY OF A BIG ATTENDANCE 

Illustrated by Samuel Cahan 



LISTEN to me, Mr. 
Abbey," and A. E. 
Dubeau, owner and 
manager of the Caughren 
Theatre at Sauk Center, 
Minn., shook an emphatic 
fist in the salesman's face, 
"that comedian is not 
worth a nickel more in 
my house than he was a 
year ago. 

"I've always paid a top 
price of $15 a day for his 
stuff, and I'm not going 
to be held up for any 
more than that. When I 
lose control of myself 
and let you stick me up 
for more then yolu'l'l 
know where to buy a nice 
little theatre that will 
pay you enough to live 
comfortably." 

"But he's worth more 
today than ever. His pro- 
ductions are a thousand 
per cent better than any 
you have ever shown in 
which he was starred." Abbey believed 
in persistency, and he had only one life 
to give in the cause. 

"Bunk!" Dubeau retorted. "It's a 
holdup, that's all, and I won't stand for 
it. No, sir! I'll give you $15 a day or 
nothing." 

And two subsequent visits made by 
.Abbey to Sauk Center failed to induce 
the Caughren manager to sign a con- 
tract. Letters from the exchange in 
Minneapolis, written by the manager, 
E. R. Pearson, and by Abbey, brought 
no response. It seemed that Du- 
beau could not be converted to 
the belief that better pictures cost 
more to produce, cost more to 
rent, and then justified themselves 
at. the box office. Then — 

One day, about a month ago. 
Dubeau made a trip to Minne- 
apolis. Abbey met him on the 
street. 

"Come on over to the office and 
say 'hello' to Mr. Pearson," he 



"I'll do that," Dubeau answered, 
"but you won't sell me those 
comedies for more than $15 a 
day." 

Arrived at the office of the First 
National Exhibitors' Circuit Ex- 
change they found Mr. Pearson 
had just gone into the projection 
room. 

"He's running 'A Dog's Life.' 
and 'Shoulder Arms' for several 
exhibitors," explained a stenog- 
rapher. 

"Let's sit in and see them," 
Abbey" invited. "You'll enjoy them 
whether you book them or not." 

Dubeau arrived back in Sauk 
Center the next day. 

"Well, I'm a boob«" he told his 
assistant. "I should have known 
that trip to Minneapolis wouldn't 




Listen to me, Mr. Abbey; that oomrdian isn't worth a nickel more in 
my house today than he mis a year ago." 



be painless. Pearson and Abbey got a 
contract out of me for Charlie Chaplin 
in 'A Dog's Life' and 'Shoulder Arms' 
at four times the money I ever paid for 
him in anything else. No, dammit, I 
wasn't drunk either. Nothing was the 
matter with me expecting that I saw 
both of his First National releases 
screened. And say, if you tell any of 
the fellows round here what I'm paying 
for those two pictures you'll need a 
will." 

The dates given Dubeau scheduled 




"4>reat snakes, I'm stuck for a Mis rental, and HOI* 
there's been n murder or something; in the 
lobby nnd nnbod} 'II kii to the •bow." 



'Shoulder Arms" for the 
first of the two he was to 
run. Sauk Center sat up 
and blinked its two thou- 
sand one hundred and 
fifty-four pairs of eyes 
when Dubeau made his. 
newspaper announcement. 
They decided, because 
the space was so much 
larger and so different 
from any of his previous 
announcements, that it 
must be a most unusual 
comedy. 

The lobby received a 
thorough application of 
Dubeau's showmanship 
practices, and Sauk Cen- 
ter began to talk. 

"Get the work done 
and come down to the 
theatre for the first show," 
he told his family. "I'm 
due to lose some money 
through foolishness, so 
you might as well see the 
stuff that tost me my bet- 
ter judgment." 

A block from the theatre Dubeau 
stopped short. 

"Holy mackerel, something's hap- 
pened," he cried .to his companion. 
"Look at that mob around the house. 
Great snakes, I'm stuck for a big rental, 
and there's been a murder or something 
and nobody'll go to the show. Come 
on, hurry up!" 

"What's the matter?" he shouted at a 
man on the edge of the crowd. 

"When in hell are they going to open 
this theatre?" the man replied. 
"The crowd's been, waiting darned 
near an hour. The manager ought 
to be shot for keeping a gang like 
this waiting that long." 

Dubeau shoved and pushed his 
way through the mob of several 
hundred men and women, trying 
to get to the entrance. 

"Cut out the crowding, will 
ya'?" someone growled. "We're 
here first." 

Dubeau backed out and ran 
round the theatre to a side exit 
and let himself in. It was the 
work of a minute to turn on the 
lights, station his assistant at the 
door and get himself into the box 
office. 

His family arrived less than an 
hour later. After forty minutes 
waiting in line they finally reached 
the ticket window. 

"How do we get in?" thev 
asked. 

"You'll have to go round to the 
back entrance and sneak in," Du- 
beau rejoined. "And don't let any- 
one see you or this mob who've 
been waiting for the first show to 
end will break down the rear 
wall." 

Among other things, in his letter 



25 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHV 



to Mr. Pearson the next day, Mr. Dubeau 
said: 

"I feel that an apology is due you to- 
gether with an explanation for my be- 
ing so darned skeptical about the First 
National's Chaplins. 

"I have shown every big picture, from 
"The Birth of a Nation," down, and up, 
but Chaplin broke all records for money 
and attendance, and the best part of it 
all is that he gave everybody eminent 
satisfaction. Fully one-third of the 
entire population of Sauk Center was in 
attendance and now they are waiting 
for the next Chaplin. 

Moral: The public will pay the bill 
— give 'em what they want. 

Albert E. Smith Goes 

To Family Reunion 

Albert E. Smith, president of Vita- 
graphs, Inc.. plans to go to California 
about the middle of March and coinci- 
dent with his departure from the East, 
a number of brothers will be journey- 
ing literally, from the four quarters of 
the globe, to a family reunion at Mr. 
Smith's home. 

Mr. Smith's father is in Santa Barbara. 
George Smith, a brother of Albert E., is 
now en route from London: Victor 
Smith, a first lieutenant, who has been 
abroad with the American expedition- 
ary forces, is headed back to this coun- 
try, and John P. Smith is on his way 
from Australia. The total number of 
brothers is seven, who expect to be at 
this reunion on March 17. This will be 
the lirst family reunion in twenty years. 



Ashley Miller Has Son 

Ashley Miller, author of "Made in 
America," is the proud father of a son. 
Mr. Miller is one of the foremost direc- 
tors of the country, and prior to a year 
ago was styled "Captain," for the reason 
that Mr. and Mrs. Miller lived on the 
good ship "Flysian," a houseboat for- 
merly anchored off City Island, N. Y., at 
which point they were renowned for 
their prowess as anglers and masters of 
the piscatorial art. 




DOLORES CASSIJVELL,I 
And E. K. Lincoln In Lconct I'c-rrct'H pro- 
duction. The Unknown Love," being; 
distributed by Pathe 



Grossman Wins Suit 
Over Octagon Films 
Stock in New York 

NEW YORK. — The decision rendered 
by Judge Frlangcr in Special Sessions 
was in favor of Harry Grossman in the 
matter of sensational charges brought 
against him by B. A. Rolfe and A. H. 
Fischer, of Octagon Films, Inc., in 
which the plaintiffs denied the fact of 
Mr. Grossman's partnership with Rolfe 
and assailed his rights to transfer his 
stock in the Octagon Films, Inc., a cor- 
poration formed to complete the pro- 
duction of the now famous Houdini 
Serial. The plaintiffs alleged that the 
said stock had been given to Mr. Gross- 
man without consideration, as against 
Mr. Grossman's contention that his 
stock represented his share in the assets 
of his partnership with Rolfe prior to 
the formation of Octagon Films, Inc., 
which was based on these assets. 

In the verdict the court set aside the 
affidavits of the plaintiffs, disposing of 
the charges of illegal transfer of the de- 
fendant's stock and establishing the fact 
of Henry Grossman's partnership with 
Rolfe and his consequent right to the 
undisputed possession, sale or trans- 
fer of the stock in Octagon Films, Inc., 
given him in consideration of his share 
in the assets of the prior partnership. 

The success of Harry Grossman's pre- 
sentation of Houdini in the "Master 
Mystery" serial lends especial promi- 
nence to the case. Mr. Grossman's lat- 
est production is "The Carter Case," a 
Craig Kennedy Serial. 



How Nebraska Editors 

View Censorship Bill j 

Hastings Tribune: There is about 1 

| as much excuse for the proposed 1 

bill as there would be in a bill I 

1 compelling every minister in Ne- I 

braska to submit his sermon to a I 

I board of censors. 

Fairbury News: One of the follies I 

[ before the Nebraska legislature is | 

[ a bill to create another high sal- 
aried board. This time it is a board 

of censors for all movie reels, and : 
the proposed law provides that 

they must have the "O. K." of this f 

board before they are exhibited in | 

the state. Such a law, if passed | 

would not only work a great hard- f 
ship and loss upon the men who 

have their money invested in the I 

business, but it would also result | 

in depreciating very materially the j 

1 quality of pictures shown. 

Norfolk Press: Some of the old I 

i women — male and female — want 

the movies censored. And there is [ 
not a city in Nebraska where the 

pictures are more carefully cen- 1 

| sored and by the movie houses I 

themselves. The old man has | 

I never seen a "smutty" picture as \ 

mentioned at the women's mass | 

[ meeting Monday in any of the Nor- \ 
folk picture houses and we attend 

pretty regularly, too. Occasional- I 
\\ there is a picture too advanced 

I for children, but when one of these f 

pictures is shown the parents I 
should keep their children away. 

f i iiiifiiHtHiififflMMinmi iiiiiituiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiMiHiiniiiiiiHiifiiMiiiiiiiMmtiniiiiuiiniiiiiihr 



Goldwyn's Easter 
Special Is on Way 
To Branch Offices 

"The Eternal Magdalene" Is 
Being Distributed for 
Exhibition 

Following receipt of the negative from 
the Goldwyn California studios at the 
eastern laboratories in New York, Gold- 
wyn is now dispatching prints of "The 
Eternal Magdalene," a picturization of 
Robert H. McLaughlin's famous play, 
to all of its North American offices. 
Trade Showings Planned 

Trade showings are to be held imme- 
diately in all offices of the company, 
giving exhibitors the opportunity to see 
the production and plan their local ex- 
ploitations of it six full weeks in advance 
of its release. 

"The Eternal Magdalene" will have 
simultaneous publication in not less than 
sixty of the country's largest cities for 
the week beginning Easter Day, April 
:.'(). Owing to the fact that behind this 
production there has been devised a 
more unusual exploitation and advertis- 
ing campaign than any ever before linked 
up with a motion picture, Goldwyn has 
planned to deliver the entire campaign 
into the hands of its exhibitors in elect- 
rotype and matrix form, thereby giving 
the exhibitor the tested and tried sales 
exploitation that proved such a success 
with "The Eternal Magdalene" as a play. 

The whole keynote of this campaign 
is to show the universality of the Mag- 
dalene; to show that she is found in 
every environment in life: that no per- 
son is out of contact with her or beyond 
the sphere of her influence. 

The production and technical unique- 
ness of this story is expected to chal- 
lenge attention wherever it is seen. One 
of the unusual facts about Goldwyn's 
publication of "The Eternal Magdalene" 
at Easter time is that for almost a year 
this drama has been held for distribution 
at this season. Under the impetus that 
publication at such a time will give^ it, 
the production is expected to be an all- 
season success throughout the spring, 
summer and fall that follow. 



Sherrill Signs Smith 

William L. Sherrill. president of The 
Frohman Amusement Corporation, has 
signed a contract with Cliff Smith to 
direct the twenty-six two-reel western 
dramas in which Texas Guinan is to be 
starred, and has also leased the Chaplin 
studios, executive buildings, developing 
plant and complete equipment. 



Film Company Fails 

SPOKANE. WASH.— The Washing- 
ton Motion Picture Corporation, which 
was heralded about a year and a half ago 
as a "bloomer,' has gone into the hands 
of a receiver. They produced "Fools 
Gold." with Mitchell Lewis, which was 
directed by Larry Trimble. 



Harry Rapf Recuperating 

Harry Rapf after a long siege of ill- 
ness is going to Lakewood for a few 
weeks to recuperate. Upon his return 
from Lakewood he will start on his 
new picture. 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



H. B. Warner Is to Be Presented 

In Greatly Diversified Offerings 

Series of Eight Photoplays to Include Stories 
Laid in Soudan, China, India, England 
and America 



When H. B. Warner, stage favorite, 
who has been engaged by Jesse D. 
Hampton to star in a series of eight 
photoplays, begins work before the 
camera at the Hollywood studios, he 
will find himself in the position of a man 
continually traveling from one country 
to another and yet remaining right in 
the city of films. 

Hampton, after consulting with offi- 
cials of the Robertson-Cole Company, 
which controls the world rights to the 
Warner productions, and Exhibitors 
Mutual, which will distribute them, has 
adopted the novel plan of presenting 
his star in a series of travel stories. 

The first picture will be laid in the 
Soudan. It is a story of the Bedouins, 
the wandering Arabs, entitled, "The 
Man Who Turned While," and which 
has been adapted for the screen by 
George Elwood Jenks. 

When the story of the Soudan is com- 
pleted, it is Hampton's intention to 
move his star over to the Orient to 
stage "Pagan Gods." This is a melo- 
drama, the scenes of which are laid in 
an interior province of China. In this 
picture, Warner will play the part of a 
sort of Chinese Gordon. He is an at- 
tache of an European embassy, and later 
becomes the principle advisor of the 
Viceroy of a Chinese province. In this 
capacity he is compelled to join a Chi- 
nese Tong and is accused of betraying 
his oath. There are some thrilling ex- 
periences for Warner and the woman 
who enters the plot. 

Next, Warner will be pictured among 
the Rajahs of India, in a production 
which will see him as a Britisher who 
goes from the heights to the lowest 
depths and back again — though an affair 
with a woman. 



The fourth Warner production is still 
to be selected. For the fifth, Mr. Hamp- 
ton has selected ''Tribulation Trail," a 
story of the East and West. In this, 
Warner will be seen as a wealthy society 
man of New York and the scene switches 
to the Arizona cattle ranges and back 
again to New York. The story and con- 
continuity were written by George El- 
wood Jenks, who did the "Prodigal 
Liar." 

Mr. Hampton plans to make the sixth 
Warner offering a crook story, a sort 
of Jimmy Valentine role for Warner. For 
the last two productions of the series, 
Mr. Hampton intends to stage Warner 
in dramas with typical English atmos- 
phere. He is dickering now for the 
rights to two English dramas that will 
allow Warner to appear at his best. 



Doll- Van President 

Makes Business Trip 

NEW YORK.— Henry Dollman, pres- 
ident of the Doll-Van Film Corporation, 
has just arrived in New York on an ex- 
tended business trip. This is the first 
visit in some time that Mr. Dollman has 
made to the metropolis. It is stated that 
Mr. Dollman will close a deal for pro- 
ductions of considerable note. 

The Doll-Van Film Company has es- 
tablished the policy of buying nothing- 
except these two classes of pictures, i. e.. 
big productions of nation-wide fame and 
the best of short features, comedies and 
dramas the market affords. 



Rothacker in New York 

Watterson R. Rothacker, president of 
Rothacker Film Manufacturing Co., left 
for New York Tuesday. Mr. Rothacker 
expects to remain in Manhattan four 
days and is stopping at the Biltmore 
hotel. 



pllll!IIIIIIIINIIIIIIUII!l!!ll!llli:!llllll!l!lllllllll^ 

[ Herald Wonderful Help j 
And Most Looked for j 

VALE'S THEATRES 

Dennison, 0. | 

| To EXHIBITORS HERALD j 
AND MOTOGRAPHY : 

I get four trade papers, but | 

1 the "HERALD" IS THE % 

| MOST LOOKED FOR AND § 

| APPRECIATED on account of j 

| "What the Picture Did for Me" j 

| department. j 

/ could hardly do without it, | 

j and I zvisli to thank you for put- | 

| ting in more criticisms on serials. § 

| It is hard to book a good serial, | 

| and your department is a won- j 

| derful help. | 
| Very truly yours. 

{Signed) S. C. Vale. | 

| Vale's Theatres, j 
Dennison, 0. 

^^ii i ■ i rutii ■ ■ iittnuii iihii ■ iitTi i m ■ i ■ if mil ntt uni itim i ■ iiniun iiihiuii miuf miniuunn'iiniiiiiniininiraui^^ 

Plunkett's New Plan 

Joseph L. Plunkett, managing director 
of the Strand theatre, is considering a 
proposition made by a number of man- 
agers of large theatres throughout the 
country to send complete Strand enter- 
tainments on tour. This would mean 
that the Strand management would have 
to arrange weekly programs exactly as 
presented at the Strand, consisting of 
an orchestra of 45 pieces. A film fea- 
ture, comedy, scenic and educational. 



Immense Studio Planned 

LOS ANGELES. — A moving picture 
plant containing at least ten studios for 
as many stars, and costing in the neigh- 
borhood of $3,000,000, is the dream of 
the Bonnie-Reed Film Manufacturing 
Company, according to a statement made 
the public affairs committee of the city 
council. It was stated that the project 
is well along and that plans have been 
consummated for the expenditure of 
$1,500,000 during the coming year. 



CO-STARS AND SCENE FROM "RECLAIMED ' 




Left — Nilen Welch, who haw the male lead in the Harry DfacRne Webster production. Center — Dramatic moment from the play. Iticlir. 

IMahle Jullenc Scott, feminine lend in a character wtudy. (Alpha Picture*, Inc.) 

27 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

ANOTHER STIRRING SERIAL, "THE CARTER CASE" 




f # 




Left — Looks bad for Herbert Kaniinson, the hero of the Craig Kennedy serial, who has fallen into unkind hands. It is a scene from 
the second episode. Center — Mr. Rawlinson and Margaret Marsh compare time of day. Right — An incident from 
the fifth episode with Mr. Rawlinson, Miss Marsh and William I'ike participating. 



Macauley's Photoplay Announced; 
Required Entire Year to Complete 



Filmatizing of "Whom the Gods 
Would Destroy," the feature picture 
which is soon to be exploited by the Ma- 
cauley company, took an entire year of 
the time of C. R. Macauley, author of 
the story "Humanity," from which the 
film is adapted. 

When Mr. Macauley first conceived the 
notion of producing the picture, he sub- 
mitted the idea to President Wilson, 
Secretary of Navy Daniels, Secretary of 
War Baker, Attorney General Gregory, 
all the other cabinet officers, and a num- 
ber of prominent professional men to 
whom the idea appealed, with the result 
that Mr. Macauley went into the Maine 
woods, where he spent five months cre- 
ating the foundation of the story "Hu- 
manity." 

Many Changes Necessary 

Upon his return to New York from 
Maine, Mr. Macauley and Nan Blair 
began working on the details of the 
story, and two months were spent at Mr. 
Macauley's home, with several hours 
each day devoted to" following the trend 
of changing conditions in Europe. 

About this time President Wilson is- 
sued his proclamation announcing the Al- 
lies' susceptibility to his proposition for 
the League of Nations, and then a fol- 
lowing proclamation conveying this dec- 
laration to the rulers of the Central Em- 
pire in his note to Austria. 

The League of Nations became the all- 
absorbing human document, and the tide 
of war changed in favor of America, fol- 
lowing the Chateau Thierry reverses to 
the German troops. 

Mr. Macauley and Miss Blair again 
joined hands and devoted several weeks 
at Washington extorting data for the re- 
modeling of the story. 

Then Came the Armistice 

On November 8, when the German 
peace delegates came from Spa to Senlis 
and thence to Guise, where Marshal Foch 
issued his drastic armistice terms, Mr. 
Macauley, Miss Blair, Mr. Sellers and 
Mr. Borzage left Los Angeles, arrived in 
New York on November 13, and again 
the story was remodeled with kaleido- 
scopic changes in world conditions, arch- 
itecturing, changing the story, and up 



to January 26 Miss Blair has continued 
inserting important incidenta and atmos- 
pheric material to add emphasis to the 
argument put forth to the League of 
Nations aims in the production. 

Many thousands of feet of negative 
were exposed in concocting the picture 
which were later rendered useless be- 
cause of the rapid changes with the last 
scene, that of the assassination of Kurt 
Eisner of Bavaria two weeks ago. 



Perret's Feature Is 

To Be Published as 
"The Unknown Love" 

"The Unknown Love" has been sub- 
stituted for the title of "Stars of Glory," 
Leonce Perret's emotional six reel 
Pathe special feature, starring Dolores 
Cassinelli with E. K. Lincoln. It was 
chosen from thousands of suggestions 
from women all over the country, a sur- 
prising number of whom selected some 
variation of the title. 

In finally deciding the title, subject to 
the approval of the author and director 
of the play, the committee of Pathe Ex- 
change Home Office, specially selected 
by Paul Brunet, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager, had regarded the romance 
from every angle, analyzed it and 
closely fixed its emotional values. 



Lasky Signs Houdini 



Harry Houdini 
Famous Players 
appear in motion 
which is for a lo 
Jesse L. Lasky 
week and work 
will be started 
Famous Players- 
wood, California 



has been signed by the 
Lasky Corporation to 
pictures. The contract, 
ng term, was closed by 
and Mr. Houdini this 
on the initial picture 
about May 1 at the 
Lasky studios in Holly- 



New MacLaren Picture 

Under the direction of Tod Brown- 
ing, Mary MacLaren has begun work on 
a new starring vehicle entitled "Prairie 
Gold." 

28 



Sawyer and Lubin 
Back in New York 
And Hard at Work 

Arthur H. Sawyer and Herbert Lubin 
returned to the offices of S-L. Pictures 
this week from Palm Beach, Florida, 
where they have been for the past five 
weeks. Their long stay in the South 
was necessitated through a severe siege of 
illness which attacked both executives of 
the S-L organization at the same time. 
Messrs. Sawyer and Lubin will imme- 
diately commence work on the final de- 
tails preparatory to presenting "Vir- 
tuous Men." 

This production, to be published as a 
Ralph Ince Film Attraction, stars E. K. 
Lincoln and marks the debut of Sawyer 
and Lubin in the field of picture makers. 
In accordance with previously arranged 
plans, work will be commenced on the 
second Ralph Ince Film Attraction 
within the next two weeks. During 
their long stay at Palm Beach the S-L 
executives put in final form the continu- 
ity for their second production. 

The leading factors of the S-L organi- 
zation have to their credit several years 
of experience in the industry. Arthur H. 
Sawyer will be well remembered for his 
production activities in connection with 
Kinemacolor Company. Herbert Lubin, 
in the field of exchanges and distribution 
has been responsible for many innova- 
tions in the selling and exploitation of 
special features. Conrad Milliken, for- 
merly vice-president of McClure Pro- 
ductions, Inc., and responsible for the 
series of Olga Petrova productions, is 
also one of the leading spirits of the new 
company. Completing the personnel of 
the S-L organization is Ralph Ince, un- 
der whose direction "Virtuous Men" was 
made. He will personally supervise the 
forthcoming series of "Ralph Ince Film 
Attractions." 



Kill Censorship Bill 

PIERRE, S. D.— The house of repre- 
sentatives practically killed the censor- 
ship bill by voting down a motion to 
put it on the calendar when the commit- 
tee reported it in without recommenda- 
tion. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Fox Company Declares "Salome" 

Biggest Success in Its History 

Seventy Prints in Use Throughout the Country 
— Chicago Alone Has Nineteen Busy 
Breaking Records in City 



The biggest money-maker in the his- 
tory of the Fox Film Corporation, and 
one of the biggest box-office bonanzas 
published since the beginning of the film 
industry. 

This is the record claimed for 
"Salome," the Theda Bara super-pro- 
duction, by the Exhibitors' Service 
Bureau of the William Fox organiza- 
tion, and telegrams, letters and box- 
office statements from all over the coun- 
try are offered to support the assertion. 
Beats "Cleopatra" Record 

"Salome," it is declared, already has 
passed the mark set by the other special 
Theda Bara feature, "Cleopatra," and 
long ago surpassed the record set by 
"The Birth of a Nation," one of the 
standards by which film success is 
measured. 

Most of the engagements for "Salome" 
have been for a week each, and in 
numerous instances, it is said, exhibitors 
have had to extend their runs to two, 
three and five weeks to satisfy the pub- 
lic's demand. 

Seventy prints of "Salome" are in use 
throughout the country. In Chicago 
alone, nineteen prints are busy, despite 
the fact that the Band Box Theatre has 
just played "Salome" for five weeks to 
a business that smashed all Chicago 
records. 

Chicago Asks More Prints 

Four prints of this picture were allot- 
ted to Chicago originally. Then nine 
more were loaned from the New York 
vaults. Ah* this before the picture had 
played a single day in Chicago. It was 
thought surely that thirteen prints of 
one feature — more than ever had been 
sent to Chicago by any company— would 
be sufficient to care for the demand of 
the exhibitors, but trade showings in- 
creased the clamor for playing dates to 
such an extent that the Chicago ex- 
change of the Fox Film Corporation 
was forced to borrow five more prints 
from other cities. 

For two weeks "Salome" was shown 
exclusively in the Band Box Theatre, 
where, with each of its 299 seats sell- 
ing for seventy-five cents, it drew more 
than $15,000 in fourteen days. The fol- 
lowing week it was retained at the Band 
Box and booked in two other loop thea- 
tres, in one of which, the new Randolph, 
it remained for eleven days following 
an original booking of but five days. 
Where It Had Week Runs 

Some of the other leading theatres in 
which "Salome" has played engagements 
of a week or more follow: Rialto and 
Strand, Atlanta, Ga.; Broadway, Law- 
rence, Mass.; Avon, Rochester, N. Y.; 
Teck, Buffalo; Colonial, Albany: Rand's, 
Troy; Lumberg, Utica; Van Curler. 
Schenectady; Armory, Binghampton; 
Lyceum, Amsterdam; City Opera House, 
Watertown, N. Y.; Richardson, Oswego, 
N. Y.; Empire. Glens Falls, N. Y.: Bijou, 



Chicago; States, Chicago — where it 
played eleven days; Davidson, Milwau- 
kee; Columbia, Dayton; Colonial, Cleve- 
land; Colonial, Toledo; Liberty, Youngs- 
town, O.; Bank, Akron, O. — where it also 
has had three additional runs; Empire, 
San Antonio, Tex.; Isis, Denver; De 
Luxe, Detroit; English's Opera House, 
Indianapolis; Walnut, Louisville; Shu- 
bert, Kansas City; William Fox Shubert, 
Minneapolis; Blue Mouse, St. Paul; Fox 
Terminal, Newark, N. J.; Tulane, New 
Orleans; Boyd's, Omaha; Sioux City, la.; 
Victoria, Harrisburg, Pa.; Alcazar, San 
Francisco; American, Oakland, Cal.; Ma- 
jestic, Portland, Ore.; Metropolitan, 
Washington, and Zak, Houston, Tex. 



Childers With Hamilton 

Hale Hamilton started work this week 
in his fourth production as a Metro 
star, in "After His Own Heart," a 
comedy romance adapted by A. S. Le 
Vino from the four-part novelette by 
Ben Ames Williams which recently ran 
in the All Story Magazine. Naomi 
Childers will be his leading woman. 



Buys Screen Rights 

The Famous Players-Lasky Corpora- 
tion has purchased the screen rights to 
J. M. Barrie's play, "The Admirable 
Crichton." and Walter Browne's "Every- 
woman." 



Kane Goes to Assist 

Exhibitors in Texas 

AUSTIN, TEXAS.— Arthur S. Kane, 
general manager for Select Pictures 
Corporation, interrupted his trip through 
the South and Middle West to Select 
exchanges, to plunge into the fight here 
against a bill pending before the legis- 
lature which would close all theaters 
Sundays. 

Mr. Kane was given an audience with 
the governor and prominent members of 
both houses. Exhibitors were very ap- 
preciative of his assistance. 



Universal Gets Cash 

M. Lowell Cash, for some time photo- 
play editor of the Indianapolis News, is 
the latest addition to the publicity forces 
of the Universal Film Exchanges, Inc., 
according to an announcement by Tark- 
ington Baker, director of publicity. Mr. 
Cash arrived in New York from In- 
dianapolis February 24 and will take up 
his work as publicity manager of the Big 
U exchange, 1600 Broadway. 



Hough Back With "U" 

H. R. Hough, one of the best known 
business executives in California motion 
picture circles, has severed his connections 
with Triangle and joined the executive 
force of Universal as business manager 
of the Universal City studio. 



Sell "Mickey" Rights 

W. H. Productions Co. announces 
that the rights to "Mickey" for Georgia. 
Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, North and 
South Carolina has been sold to Mr. S. 
J. Samuels. 



WHEN "HOOPLA" PLAYED THE KINEMA 




One of the many iiiuiNuni atanta used to put over the Exhibitor* Mutual picture at the 
popular I, on AitfrelcM theatre. The unique lobby dinpla? attracted wide aotlce. 



20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



4 'He Loves Me—" 




MARJORIE DAW 
Who appears in support of Douglas Fair- 
banks in "Something; for Somebody," 
an Artcraft picture 



Travers Starring in 

Argus Co. Production 

The Argus Lamp and Appliance Com- 
pany of Cleveland, O., manufacturers 
of an incandescent lamp attachment for 
projectors, has entered the field of mo- 
tion picture production. 

The initial feature of the company has 
just been completed. Richard C. 
Travers, formerly of Essanay and re- 
cently a major in the United States 
army, plays the leading role in the pro- 
duction. 

It is understood that the production 
is a big special in calibre and was 
financed by a group of Cleveland cap- 
italists. 

It is reported that William A. Brady 
has made a large bid for the world 
rights to the production. 



Gives Scenario Course 



LOS ANGELES, CAL.— A follow-up 
course in continuity writing is announced 
by the University of California Exten- 
sion as the logical outcome of a success- 
ful class in scenario writing just com- 
pleted. M. M. Stearns, scenario editor 
for the Dorothy Gish Corporation, will 
conduct the class. 



Hayakawa Is Popular 

Thirty-four hundred theatres through- 
out the United States are showing the 
Sussue Hayakawa features produced by 
the Haworth Pictures Corporation, ac- 
cording to an announcement by Ex- 
hibitors Mutual. 



Fire Destroys Theatre 

SAND COULEE, MONT.— The Lib- 
erty theatre here was destroyed by fire 
startinpr in the operator's booth. 



Special Novelties 
Furnished Exhibitors 
For "False Faces" 

Card Board False Faces for 
The Youngsters — Eight 
Lobby Posters 

The Famous Players-Lasky Corpora- 
tion believes that the exhibitor should 
have easy sailing in putting over the 
Paramount-Artcraft special, "The False 
Faces," the Thomas H. Ince production 
starring Henry B. Walthall. 

One of the special novelties it has 
issued to help the exhibitor put this 
seven-reel feature over is a post card 
bearing an advertisement for "The False 
Faces," leaving room for the exhibitor 
to print his announcement on the front 
of the card. On the reverse side is a 
false face or mask lithographed in colors. 
All that is necessary to make this a regu- 
lar false face is to push the finger 
through the die cut places where the 
eyes and nose fit. It is believed the 
youngsters will enjoy this novelty im- 
mensely and that the advertising value 
will be considerable. 

The Famous Players-Lasky advertise- 
ments in the Saturday Evening Post 
have attracted the attention of the mul- 
titude of Post readers. Inasmuch as 
"The False Faces" was originally con- 
tributed to the Post by Louis Joseph 
Vance, it is urged that the exhibitor play 
this point up in his advertising. A mail 
campaign among Post readers — a list of 
whom may be secured from the local 
news dealers — is also suggested as a 
strong patronage puller. 

Other Aids Furnished 

A handsome half sheet is being sent 
to the exhibitor carrying the comment of 
the reviewers, which should prove an 
effective aid. 

Eight different posters in one sheet, 
three sheets, six sheets and twenty-four 
sheets that are said to be the finest type 
of work yet put out along these lines are 
also at the disposal of the exhibitor, who 
is advised to bill his town, like a circus. 
In addition there is a handsome retogra- 
vure one sheet that can be given promi- 
nent place in front of the theatre. 

A plentiful supply of cuts for use in 
newspapers and house organs are avail- 
able at exchanges. Mats are free to ex- 
hibitors who can use them. 

Photographs for lobb} r display pur- 
poses come in various sizes. There are 
the 8x10 and 11x14, as well as the large 
32x28 scene photo and the 8x10 photo of 
the star. Exhibitors are urged to get a 
full set of these and frame them for 
lobby display as a vital source of ex- 
ploitation. 

Use Mail Campaign 

The press book contains a full list of 
accessories available, besides displaying 
the various ads, cuts and mats. It also 
contains a mail campaign, various pub- 
licity stories to be sent to the local pa- 
oers in advance of showing and various 
bits of data necessarv for any special 
"dodger" campaign the exhibitor may 
decide to use. 



Marinette, Wis. — Peshtigo is to have 
a motion picture house again for the first 
time since the T. O. O. F. building was 
destroyed by fire a year ago. Ollif Lar- 
son, former proprietor of the Stat Thea- 
tre, is erecting the new theatre. 



Automatic Machinery 
Saves Human Efforts 
Says George K. Spoor 

Inquiries have come in so rapidly in 
regard to the Spoor-Thompson method 
of processing film by automatic machin- 
ery, that George K. Spoor has increased 
his office and sales force, to work under 
the direction of Charles F. Stark, sales 
manager. 

New business also has increased to 
such an extent that it has been neces- 
sary to enlarge the factory force and to 
put another machine into operation. 
There are now ten machines at the Chi- 
cago laboratories, each capable of proc- 
essing 1,000,000 feet of film a week. 
Time to Adopt New Methods 

"I am more than satisfied with the 
work of these machines," said Mr. Spoor. 
"They have worked even more smoothly 
than expected, and the results obtained 
have surpassed the anticipation of those 
who have tried this method. 

"I am convinced that the time is now 
ripe for all the big manufacturers of the 
business to adopt this new process. Just 
as automatic machinery has pushed out 
individual work in other lines, so will it 
do in this. Human judgment is likely to 
be in error and the work as the result of 
such judgment to be lacking in uniform- 
ity. The automatic machine processes 
with an infallibility that no human ef- 
fort can compare with and at the same 
time does away with unnecessary labor 
and loss from mistakes, thus saving 
enormous sums for the producer. 
Greatly Reduces Costs 

"I am more than gratified at the great 
interest shown by the industry in this 
new method. It has been phenomenal 
considering that it is a new process. It 
is almost always a difficult and uphill 
task to induce the public to accept an 
innovation. Many will cling to old 
methods until forced to adopt the new 
through competition. 

"But in this instance we have been 
able to demonstrate the value of this 
process, both in the quality of the film 
processed and in the great reduction in 
cost, that it has been adopted even more 
speedily than I expected. I believe that 
it will be but a short time until all the 
large manufacturers adopt this process- 
ing method." 



Fox Purchases Screen 

Rights to "Checkers" 

Screen rights to "Checkers," one of 
the biggest money makers of the Ameri- 
can drama, have been purchased by 
William Fox, and Director Richard 
Stanton is already at work on the pro- 
duction. 

The cast will include fifty principals. 
The racing scene, one of the strongest 
points of the play, will be produced at 
a southern race track. 

For fifteen years Tommy Ross toured 
the country in this play. The price paid 
for the motion picture rights is reported 
to have been large. 



Miss Ferguson Returns 

Elsie Ferguson, who has been at 
Miami, Fla, filming, under direction of 
George Fitzmaurice. the famous A. E. 
W. Mason play, "The Witness for the 
Defense," returned to New York last 
week. 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Universal Will Make Strong Bid 

For Export Business at Once 

Carl Laemmle Announces Choice of George E. 
Kann as Manager of Export Department 
— Honors Dan B. Lederman 



Device to Measure 

Camera Vibrations 

Has Been Perfected 

Of interest to the trade in general is 
a new invention known as the Mercury 
Seisometer. This instrument is used to 
measure the vibrations of the Universal 
motion picture camera. 

The instrument consists of an iron cup 
containing a quantity of mercury and an 
adjustable electrical contact, in close 
proximity to the surface of the mercury, 
so that the least agitation of the surface 
completes the circuit at the contact and 
gives a visible indication in a sensitive 
galvanometer connected in the circuit. 

By means of a micrometer adjustment, 
calibrated to thousandths of an inch, the 
distance between the contact and the sur- 
face of the mercury may be varied a 
measured amount. 

In operation the mercury container 
with its associated contact is mounted 
on the camera or other device the vibra- 
tion of which is to be measured, and the 




Mercury Seisometer in Operation, Regis- 
tering the Camera'.* Vibrations 

contact is adjusted so as to just clear the 
surface of the mercury. The camera is 
then operated at the normal speed, 
thereby agitating the surface of the mer- 
cury and completing the circuit to the 
galvanometer. While the camera is still 
in operation the contact is gradually 
raised a measured distance until the cir- 
cuit is completely interrupted. The 
reading of the micrometer adjustment 
is then a measure of the comparative 
vibration of the instrument under test. 

The actual vibration of the instrument 
is but a small fraction of the indicated 
vibration of the mercury surface, the ex- 
treme sensitiveness of which magnifies 
the vibration to be tested. 



Film Blue Book Story 

Harry T. Morey's March Vitagraph 
offering is "Fighting Destiny." based on 
a novelette called "Jungleheart," by 
Stanley Shaw, which was published in 
"The Blue Book Magazine." 



Two new appointments, within the 
executive offices of the Universal Film 
Co. were announced last week by Carl 
Laemmle, president of the firm. Simul- 
taneously with the announcement that 
George B. Hammond had resigned as 
manager of Universal's export depart- 
ment came word from Mr. Laemmle that 
George L. Kann, for six years assistant 
to the president, had been selected as 
Mr. Hammond's successor. At the same 
time it was announced that having com- 
pleted his work of installing new sys- 
tems in Universal exchanges through- 
out the country, Dan B. Lederman was 
to become assistant to i\lr. Laemmle, 
immediately. 

Men Honored Well Known 

Air. Kann and Mr. Lederman have 
been so prominent in the rapid develop- 
ment of Universal in the laal^few years 
that little of their past record need be 
repeated. However it is interesting to 
note that Mr. Lederman is one of the 
oldest him exchange managers in the 
country, having been connected with 
Universal for over ten years, being until 
last spring, manager ot the Des Moines 
exchange and later special systematizer 
of all exchanges. ror the past ten 
months, he has been visiting Universal 
exchanges installing a complete new sys- 
tem winch has already proved of ex- 
ceptional value in the handling of book- 
ings, shipments, and accounts. The new 
system was devised by Mr. Lederman 
and its practicability demonstrated to 
Universal executives. 

In making Mr. Kann, Air. Hammond's 
successor, Mr. Laemmle is confident he 
has picked a man who is aggressive and 
sufficiently acquainted with foreign con- 
ditions to carry out the big task of 
broadening the scope of foreign distri- 
bution in 1919. The signing of the ar- 
mistice has brought about conditions in 
foreign lands that are most favorable 
and America's participation in the war 
and the value of American films used 
lor propaganda purposes during the war 
has brought Yankee film products before 
the world more forcefully than ever be- 
fore. The demand for motion picture 
productions of the right sort, is becom- 
ing greater every day and with an idea 
of giving good films the best distribu- 
tion possible, Universal is going to make 
a stronger bid for foreign business than 
ever before. To carry out such a pro- 
gram is a big task, yet Air. Kann is very 
enthusiastic about his new position and 
hopeful of obtaining maximum results. 

Statement From Mr. Laemmle 

Speaking of the new appointments, 
Mr. Laemmle has said: — "As has often 
been said, we expect 1919 to be a record 
year for Universal in every way. We 
expect to broaden the scope of our film 
distribution abroad and having had 
Mr. Kann working with me constantly 
for six years, I am confident that he 



will prove equal to the task of carrying 
out our program for foreign exploitation. 

"Mr. Lederman has been an employee 
of Universal for many years, has been 
an exchange manager, and a very suc- 
cessful one too, a great systematizer 
as he has proved by installing a new 
and very practical system in all our 
branch offices, and I am sure he will 
prove a valuable addition to our home 
office staff. Air. Lederman knows con- 
ditions in all parts of the country and 
has a good knowledge of the manufac- 
turing, or producing end of the business. 
He is enthusiastic, very aggressive and 
in bringing him East, we have added 
another 'exhibitor's man' to our al- 
ready large and practical executive 
force." 

Exhibitors Mutual Holds 

First Runs at Pittsburgh 

Exhibitors Mutual had almost a mo- 
nopoly of first runs in Pittsburgh last 
week. 

At the Alinerva, Henry B. Walthall 
played in "And a Still Small Voice," 
followed by William Desmond in "Life's 
a Funny Proposition." The Camera- 
phone played "The Prodigal Liar," star- 
ring William Desmond for a three-day 
run. Sessue Hayakawa was on at the 
Lyceum in his latest release, "Bonds 
of Honor," for the entire week. At the 
Alhambra in East Liberty, which is 
classed as a first run Pittsburgh house. 
"The Eleventh Commandment" played 
for three days. 

Last week's first run bookings on Ex- 
hibitors Mutual subjects in Pittsburgh 
included "The Eleventh Commandment" 
and "A Trick of Fate" at the Lyric, 
and "Hoop-La," with Billie Rhodes, and 
"All of a Sudden Norma," with Bessie 
Barriscale, at the Alinerva. 

Greiver Gets Rights 

To "Spreading Evil" 

S. B. Greiver, well-known distributor, 
reenters the state right field this week 
with the purchase of James Keane's pro- 
duction. "The Spreading Evil," for Illi- 
nois, Indiana and southern Wisconsin. 

Air. Greiver has been identified with 
distribution in the middle west for seve- 
ral years and recently had United States 
distribution rights on the Ford Weekly. 
Since this arrangement was terminated 
a few weeks ago Air. Greiver has been 
investigating various distribution propo- 
rtions and finally decided upon the re- 
lease of "The Spreading Evil" in the mid- 
dle west territory. 

"The Spreading Evil" is the initial of- 
fering of the James Keane Productions 
of Xew York and was personally pro- 
duced by Mr. Keane. who was associ- 
ated for some time with Thrmas H. Ince 
as director and producer. The produc- 
tion is of a sensational type and has met 
with a big success in eastern territories 
where it has boon issued. 



31 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



DIGEST OF PICTURES OF THE WEEK 



MR. VACHEL LINDSAY, author of "The Art of 
the Moving Picture" and lecturer of note, re- 
cently addressed a meeting of intellectuals at 
Columbia University upon the future of the motion pic- 
ture. Perhaps the most pertinent statement that lie 
made, at least the most important to those who art; 
vitally concerned in the advance of the film drama, was 
the following: 

"In most cases a photoplay is good so far as it fol- 
lows the scenario and bad so far as the director takes 
liberties with the scenario. The scenario writer is para- 
mount." He further states that "the scenario is like 
the man who takes his dog to a sausage factory. When 
it comes out he has no dog at all." 

It is true that the scenario writer, possessing the 
picture in its most pliable form, viewing it as a whole 
rather than in sections, as must the director, is in the 
better position to make of that photoplay a thing of 
beauty and artistic excellence. It would be well for 
those in power to examine Mr. Lindsay's theory and 
act upon the truths to be found therein. 

"PUT UP YOUR HANDS !" is as good a vehicle 
as Margarita Fisher has lately occupied. Dash, fresh- 
ness, cleanliness and popular appeal are its strong points 
and these it has in good measure. 

"WHAT EVERY WOMAN WANTS," according 
to the Grace Darmond explanation, is clothes. How 
one woman gets them, and the adventures into which 
her need of fine raiment leads her, makes an interesting 
and very beautiful photoplay. 

"THE FORFEIT" marks the return of an old 
favorite. House Peters, after an absence of many months. 
He has lost none of his power and appears to excellent 
advantage, a slightly over-complex plot being the single 
slight defect in the film story, a defect that will be over- 
looked. 

"A FIGHT FOR LOVE" furnishes exceptionally 
authentic background and support for Harry Carey's 
usual repertoire of Western stunts and characterization. 
The picture pleases. 

"THE MARRIAGE PRICE" may sound decep- 
tively "pink." The story and production is really in 



perfect keeping with the star's personality and ability. 
A most complete and satisfying composition. 

"A GENTLEMAN OF QUALITY" proves a suit- 
able characterization for the finished acting of Earle 
Williams. Heavy, perhaps, but well clone in every de- 
partment. 

"THE WICKED DARLING'" is another one of 
those titles which hint of much and conceals but little. 
Priscilla Dean is at her best in this underworld drama, 
a drama well constructed and clean. 

"A MAN AND HIS MONEY," a mixture of 
melodrama and straight comedy, is excellently staged 
and gains considerable weight from the free-swinging 
genius of Tom Moore. 

"SATAN JR." equips the comically inclined Viola 
Dana with an instrument which she wields to the profit 
of herself, the producing company and the general pub- 
lic. A thoroughly funny photoplay. 

"PARTNERS THREE" gives Enid Bennett's 
powerful personality great scope, the result being a well- 
balanced and thoroughly satisfactory bit of entertain- 
ment. 

"LOVE AND THE LAW" concerns German spies 
and their plottings and propaganda, but so well has it 
been detailed and executed that it works up a genuine 
interest of its own more than equal to the overcoming 
of the popular prejudice against plays of the class. 

"WHEN MEN DESIRE," Theda Bara's latest 
feature, is just what the name of the picture, in associa- 
tion with the name of the star, promises. It also con- 
cerns the despicable Hun rather deeply. 

"CROOK OF DREAMS" makes a curiosity-pro- 
voking title for a typically World production which 
Louise Huff dominates with her best style of acting. 

"POOR BOOB," with Bryant Washburn, is an 
amusing though not highly original story. Excellent 
work by the cast and the direction of Donald Crisp 
count for much in the picture's favor. 

"A WILD GOOSE CHASE" carries a surprise in 
the way of an unusual locale and unique development 
for a story that might have been only commonplace 
with other equipment. Hazel Daly is the featured player. 



32 




Margarita Fisher in 

PUT UP YOUR HANDS 

Five Part Comedy Drama; American. 
Directed by Edward Sloman. 
Published in March. 

OPINION: The West of today, the 
modern West of motor cars and paved 
streets, is made the background against 
which the athletic star is shown in some 
of her most amusing moods. The story 
is a light affair in which stress is laid 
upon the comedy elements, the more 
serious plot being almost burlesqued. 
This method of treatment does a whole 
lot to remove the flavor of the trite 
from the story. Excellent choice of 
types and swiftly-moving action are fur- 
ther points in the picture's favor. There 
are moments when the action seems to 
hesitate and ponder over the course 
which it is to pursue, moments when 
there seems danger of falling into the 
rut of the commonplace, but these are 
safely passed without serious damage 
being done. Altogether, the play is a 
nice little comedy offering which will 
keep a pleasant humor prevalent among 
the average audience and should more 
than please those who care for the star's 
peculiar personality. George Periolat 
and Emory Johnson afford notable sup- 
port. 

SYNOPSIS: Olive Baxter, whose 
athletic inclinations terrify her mother, 
goes west with her father and his sec- 
retary to open a mining claim agency. 
Leonard Hewitt, college graduate and 
owner of the richest claim thereabouts, 
is mistaken for a bandit but later is 
vindicated. Olive puts life into the town, 
recently gone dry, and soon has the 
men and women of the place making 
her gymnasium their headquarters. Her 
father's secretary, after attempting to 
get Hewitt's claim by honest means, 
tries to pet it dishonestly. The race 
which follows ends in the frustration 
of the secretary's plans and the mating 
of Olive and Leonard. 



Grace Darmond in 

WHAT EVERY WOMAN 
WANTS 

Five Part Drama; Exhibitors Mutual. 
Directed by Jesse D. Hampton. 
Published in March. 

OPINION: The love of womankind 
for beautiful clothes and luxuries is 
wisely made the basis for the theme of 
this very modern drama. The male side 
of the question, that of providing the 
costly attire and equipment essential to 
the modern woman's existence, is also 
vividly depicted. The two promise deep 
and widespread interest in the play 
when presented to the public. The stag- 
ing of the piece is carefully calculated 
to satisfy the eye. Then there is a plot 
of many threads and complications which 
lift the whole above the grade of the 
mere fashion show. And so well has 
the plot been constructed that, though 
the conclusion may seem perfectly ob- 
vious at times, the climax contains a 
surprise that is as logical as it is un- 



expected. There is no point in the pic- 
ture upon which a serious objection may 
be hung. It has a wide appeal. It has 
great story value. It is well done. That 
is about enough recommendation for 
any photoplay. 

SYNOPSIS: Gloria Graham, stenog- 
rapher for Horace Lennon, cannot dress 
herself properly on fifteen dollars a 
week. Her sweetheart goes to war and 
in the days that follow she is persuaded 
to accept financial aid of her employer. 
When she hears of her sweetheart's 
death she consents to marry Lennon. 
After a few months they tire of each 
other and he returns to an old light o' 
love, she living only for style. The re- 
turn of her sweetheart, after the war, 
and the murder of Lennon precipitate 
a crisis. Accused of the murder, she is 
denounced on the stand and her past 
life made to appear infamous. Acquitted, 
after the confession of the real mur- 
derer, she is taken back by her soldier 

veetheart, who has never doubted her 
love throughout all the trials. 



House Peters in 

THE FORFEIT 

Five Part Drama; Powell-Hodkinson. 
Directed by Frank Powell. 
Published March 9. 

OPINION: Close attention to the un- 
folding of the plot is necessary to grasp 
the full import of the scenes which 
move rather rapidly during the early 
part of this straight western drama, but 
the story is unusual enough to warrant 
the putting forth of such an effort. Aside 
from this bit of complexity there is 
much to admire in the production. It 
has weight and balance, force and effect. 
The atmosphere of the West is nicely 
established and not overdone. The act- 
ing of the cast is satisfactory. House 
Peters, returning after a long and unex- 
plained absence from the screen, is 
given a role which puts no great strain 
upon his ability, the burden of the work 
falling upon Jane Miller, his very capable 
partner. The remainder of the cast do 
nothing extraordinary, but satisfy. 
Rather heavy as to type, the chief 
strength of the picture for the exhibitor 
lies in the fact that it marks House 
Peters' return and brings him back favor- 
ably. His past work should make his 
name a certain power for drawing pat- 
ronage. The picture will please. 

SYNOPSIS: Bob Masters marries El- 
vine Van Blooren and is disinherited. 
They go to the West, where Bob's elder 
brother, Jeff, has gone some years be- 
fore, also because of parental wrath. 
Here Bob becomes the ^ead of a gang 
of bandits and a reward is placed upon 
his head. Elvine, not knowing that Bob 
is a member, betrays the hiding place 
of the gang and Bob is hung. Four 
years later, she meets and marries Jeff, 
not knowing: of the relationship. They 
are happy for a while, until an old ac- 
quaintance appears and acquaints them 
with the facts. They separate but when 
Jeff is wounded in a pistol duel and El- 
vine appears in time to save his life, 
they decide that their love is the only 
thing that counts after a'l and go back 
to their cabin in peace. 



Harry Carey in 

A FIGHT FOR LOVE 

Six Part Drama; Universal. 
Directed by Jack Ford. 
Published March 24. 

OPINION: Real Indians who act as 
real Indians, not as the hybrids common 
to screen attempts of the sort, furnish an 
atmosphere of realism to a typical Harry 
Carey production. As Cheyenne Harry 
the star has one of most fitting roles that 
has been given him and makes capital of 
every one of the many opportunities pre- 
sented. Farrell MacDonald, as the fight- 
ing priest, scores an individual imperson- 
ation worthy of especial note. Joseph 
Harris is satisfactory as the somewhat 
"old school" half-breed renegade. The 
settings and natural scenery forming the 
background of the piece are eye-filling 
and pleasant. Considered simply as a 
story the tale is rather trite, but the 
treatment given it and the details by 
which it is worked out to a satisfying 
finish are such as to give it the appear- 
ance of freshness. All things consid- 
ered, the offering is likely to attain as 
much and possibly more popularity than 
the usual Harry Carey publication. 

SYNOPSIS : Cheyenne Harry, pursued 
by a posse of sheriffs and deputies, 
reaches the Canadian border just in time 
to make good his escape. In the hills 
he meets Tall Pine, an Indian chief, and 
lives with him for a time, learning thus 
of Black Michel, a renegade whiskey 
runner, and his evil treatment of Tall 
Pine's daughter. At the village store he 
also meets Kate MacAleer, the store- 
keeper's daughter, and falls in love with 
her. Black Michel uses his power over 
her father to win Kate for himself. With 
the aid of a priest who is not afraid to 
fight when occasion justifies it, Harry 
manages to bring about the capture of 
the whiskey runners and the death of 
Black Michel, their leader, thus aveng- 
ing the death of an Indian suitor to Tall 
Pine's daughter and winning Kate for 
himself. 



Elsie Ferguson in 

THE MARRIAGE PRICE 

Five part drama; Artcraft. 
Directed by Emile Chautard. 
Published March 9. 

OPINION: The even tenor of easy self- 
sufficiency which is characteristic of 
Elsie Ferguson's personality is made the 
keynote of the present production. It 
moves with the same steady, unhurried 
assurance and registers an impression 
quite as pleasing. Enacted in scenes of 
luxuriant splendor it provides a suitable 
background for the beauty of the star, 
and the persons chosen to make up the 
rest of the cast harmonize in appearance 
and carriage. The story itself is noth- 
ing remarkable, having been done with 
slight variations numerous times in the 
past. In it figure the loss of the girl's 
fortune, her marriage for wealth and the 
near ruin of her husband by a former 
but unworthy sweetheart. Familiar 
though the incidents are, the manipula- 
tion is such as to place the production 
mi a rather high plane of general ex- 



33 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



cellence. Wyndham Standing and Lionel 
Atwill are given roles almost equal in 
importance to that of the star, and their 
impersonations are artistically and real- 
istically done. Perfectly clean in every 
respect, it really should have been given 
a better title. However, it will over- 
come this defect. 

SYNOPSIS: Helen Tremaine, one of 
the most extravagent of the smart set, 
is impoverished by the sudden death of 
her father. Deserted by her wealthy 
friends, she seeks employment, without 
success. With but ten cents left in her 
purse she is invited to lunch by Kenneth 
Gordon, ne'er-do-well of her former cir- 
cle of friends. She accepts but is met 
instead by his employer. Frederick 
Lawton, a Western millionaire newly 
come to New York. Later she marries 
Lawton, with purely mercenary motives. 
But when Gordon tries to ruin Lawton 
in the street to win her back she finds 
that she really loves her husband and 
all ends well. 



Earle Williams in 

A GENTLEMAN OF QUALITY 

Five Part Drama; Vitagraph. 
Directed by James Young. 
Published March 17. 

OPINION: The objection usually reg- 
istered against a production which bur- 
dens the star with a dual role is in this 
case overcome by reason of a plot struc- 
ture which dispenses with the customary 
double exposure and builds up and main- 
tains suspense of rare quality. The play 
is straight drama throughout, drama 
dependent upon subtitle and emotional 
acting rather than upon action for its 
strength, but so well is the interest 
drawn and held that there should be no 
complaint on this ground. Katherine 
Adams is the star's main support, sup- 
port that never varies in quality, but the 
remainder of the cast acquit themselves 
creditably in the lesser roles. The title 
is one which throws the burden of the 
drawing power upon the name of the star 



and the popularity of the novel. If 
these are sufficient to draw attendance, 
the picture will please in every depart- 
ment. The story is adult in theme and 
tenor, but there is nothing in it which 
cannot be safely exhibited to the entire 
family. 

SYNOPSIS : John Ashton, adopted in 
infancy by a wealthy American, is thrown 
into disgrace by a mysterious woman 
and disinherited by his foster parents. 
Lord John Hertford, in London, is lured 
away on his wedding night by the same 
woman. A year later Ashton is taken to 
the -Hertford estate and mistaken for 
Lord* John despite his protestations. 
Here he is finally persuaded to live as 
Lord John for the happiness of Lady 
Mercy, whom he insists must "remarry" 
him. Seven years later the real Lord 
John is found to be dead and the myste- 
rious woman, a Sicilian, confesses the 
plot and the crime, establishing also Ash- 
ton's real identity as the twin brother of 
Lord John. 



Priscilla Dean in 

THE WICKED DARLING 

Five Part Drama; Universal. 
Directed by Tod Browning. 
Published February 24. 

OPINION : A notable performance in 
every detail which will be handicapped in 
the consideration of some exhibitors be- 
cause of the title which has been affixed 
to it and the impression which that con- 
veys. "The Wicked Darling" is, in the 
reality of the play, a young lady reared 
in the slums and taught from childhood 
to pick pockets. Her reformation and 
eventual rise to the world of respecta- 
bility and the position of an honest man's 
wife is worked out splendidly and con- 
vincingly without resort to employment 
of the sex motives and incidents which 
might be expected. The picture is clean, 
every inch of the way. True, it is laid 
for the most part in the slums of a great 
city, but the faithful reproduction of this 



atmosphere and the sterling character- 
izations given the denizens thereof by 
the star and such aids as Spottiswoode 
Aiken, Lon Chaney and Wellington 
Playter, lend the production artistic value 
commanding great admiration. It is 
difficult to see the wisdom of attaching a 
suggestive title to a picture which is per- 
fectly capable of satisfying and succeed- 
ing unusually well on its own merits. 

SYNOPSIS: Kent Mortimer, losing his 
fortune, is dismissed by Adele Hoyt, to 
whom he has been engaged. Mary Ste- 
vens, lady pickpocket, seeks shelter in his 
home. They meet again when he has 
taken lodgings near her home because of 
their cheapness. A string of pearls 
which she has stolen but wishes to re- 
turn is coveted by Stoop Connors, a 
friend of the old days. His attempts to 
gain possession of it and the means by 
which Kent and Mary manage to return 
it and rid themselves of Connors' perse- 
cutions, leading to their own happiness, 
provides the rest of the action. 



Tom Moore in 

A MAN AND HIS MONEY 

Five-part comedy drama; Goldwyn. 
Directed by Harry Beaumont. 
Published March 20. 

OPINION: Coupling the very farc- 
ical with tensely melodramatic, the 
whole sacrifices the strength of single 
striking force to gain variety. The ef- 
fect on the audience is thus broken up 
into varying impressions, the sum of 
which are not equal to the single one 
that would have been the result of elim- 
inating all but one. Otherwise there is 
not a weak point in the picture and this 
complaint is not sufficient to condemn 
a picture rich in technical and artistic 
merit. 

Tom Moore's role is a typical one and 
typically portrayed. Seena Owen and 
Syd ney Ainsworth are the chief sup- 
porting members of the cast and play 
up to the star's lead in excellent style. 
The settings are appropriately splendid 
and arranged according to a scenario 
which is logically constructed. A bit 
adult in appeal, it makes a very credit- 
able showing for entertainment of that 
class. 

SYNOPSIS: Harry Lathrop, wealthy 
waster, drinks himself into the disfavor 
of Betty Dalrymple, his fiancee, then 
attempts to reform himself by placing 
his money where he cannot get it. He 
answers an "ad" and engages as keeper 
of the kennels at Betty's wealthy aunt's 
home. Here he finds Betty besieged by 
Walter Randall, an unscrupulous suitor, 
who plots with the maid to force her ac- 
ceptance of his proposal. Betty is lured 
to Randall's hunting lodge, but Harry 
follows, takes the automobile away from 
Randall's chauffeur, breaks into the 
lodge, where Betty is struggling with 
Randall, gains control of the situation 
and takes Betty back to her home. 
Here Betty confesses that she loves him 
and him only, with the usual result. 



Cannibals Go Big 

Martin Johnson's "Cannibals of the 
South Seas" are doing extraordinary 
business, according to reports from ex- 
hibitors to Exhibitors Mutual. Man- 
ager George Fischer of Saxe's Alham- 
bra theatre, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
broke all house records with the "Can- 
nibals." 




34 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Viola Dana in 

SATAN JR. 

Five Part Comedy; Metro. 
Directed by Herbert Blache. 
Published March 3. 

OPINION: The cleanly, sprightlv 
comedy of the star and the steady 
capable support of the cast are the dom- 
inant features of this unusual produc- 
tion. Milton Sills' utter sincerity of 
character make a capital foil for the 
playful deviltry which gains for the star 
the name which is the title of the play. 
Remarkable, also, is the work of Her- 
bert Blache in his direction of a plot 
so light of fabric that a single blunder 
would have spelled ruin. But such blun- 
der there is none. In setting, in photog- 
raphy, in incident and detail, there are 
few current productions to match this 
one. The title should be certain to 
excite curiosity in any observer. The 
picture is of a character that solidly 
backs up the choice of such a title, yet 
has in it no touch of impropriety. A 
picture which may be shown to the 
whole family and should entertain 
every member thereof. 

SYNOPSIS: Paul Worden, novelist, 
takes up residence near the country 
place of the Ardways and is soon the 
talk of the community. Diana Ardway, 
mere child in appearance, meets Wor- 
den one day while riding. She deter- 
mines to invade his home and see if he 
is as bad as painted. This she does, 
falling in love with Worden and deciding 
to marry him. He then brings his 
younger brother to try to distract the 
girl's attention. This failing, matters 
are brought to a head when Diana ab- 
ducts him and then refuses to marry 
him when he finally consents. Discov- 
ering then that he really loves her he 
manages to bring about the desired 
ending. 



Enid Bennett in 

PARTNERS THREE 

Five part drama; Paramount. 
Directed by Fred Niblo. 
Published March 23. 

OPINION: Enid Bennett has per- 
sonality plus and in "Partners Three" 
she wins one's sympathy at the very 
start and holds it throughout the five 
reels. The story is unusual. Its realism 
grips one and while most of the action 
takes place on the great American des- 
ert, where everything is hot and depress- 
ing, the action moves along swiftly and 
surely to a logical conclusion. 

Never has Robert McKim, who plays 
the role of the renegade husband, ap- 
peared to better advantage, and with 
the assistance of Casson Ferguson, John 
P. Lockney and Lydia Titus all score 
individual hits. It is one of the best 
features in which Miss Bennett has ap- 
peared upon the screen and Fred Niblo 
is to be complimented upon his clever 
direction. 

SYNOPSIS: Agnes Cuyler, young and 
beautiful, is a cabaret dancer in New 
York, a life against which her better 
nature revolts. She accepts the mar- 
riage proposal of a Westerner. The 
man, however, proves to be a drunkard 
and coward. Because she takes from 
him his whisky flask, he pushes her from 
his auto on the desert and leaves her 
to walk to town. Lost on the ocean of 
sand, she is found almost exhausted by 
Hassayampa Hardy, a desert rat, who 
takes her to his dugout. He secures her 




MARION DAVIES, 
Who stars in the Select Special pro- 
duction, "The Belle of New York." 



a position in a distant village as waitress 
at a restaurant, where she meets Arthur 
Gould, who is sick. She feeds him, and, 
when he falls ill, gives him shelter in her 
home. Uncharitable women try to at- 
tribute wrong motives to her action, and 
she is about to be driven from the town 
when the man Hardy arrives for pro- 
visions. Then the three go out into the 
desert. Cuyler follows, discovers that 
Hardy has found gold, steals the loca- 
tion notice, and, after having drained 
Hardy's water barrels, forces his wife to 
return to town with him. Hardy and 
Gould pursue them to town and save 
Agnes from death at the hands of her 
husband. He flees to the desert, where 
vengeance in a novel form overtakes 
him, and where the love romance of 
Agnes and Gould finds a happv denoue- 
ment. 



Glen White in 

LOVE AND THE LAW 

Six Part Drama; Sherry-General. 
Directed by Edgar Lewis. 
Published March 2. 

OPINION: Seldom is such attention 
to detail, such pains for the perfec- 
tion and maintenance of atmosphere, no- 
ticeable in the mechanical preparation of 
the photoplay. And seldom is the selec- 
tion of types for background carried 
with such success to the most minor 
character in the cast. Much credit 
should accrue to Edgar Lewis for his 
efforts in this direction. He has achieved 
that which nine men out of ten would 
have said was impossible. "The Troop 
Train" was widely read as a story in the 
Saturday Evening Post. But, as the title 
indicates, it has to do with the nation's 
warriors, if not with the war itself. With 
the signing of the armistice it would have 
seemed hardly a promising attempt to 
make of the story a photoplay with pop- 
ular interest. But that is just what Ed- 
gar Lewis did. Though it bristles with 
German intrigue and plot, though a large 
portion of the characters are German, 
the story has been made to stand out and 
demand the attcnt ; on of the observer, 



then to please that observer thoroughly. 
Under the new title, there is every rea- 
son to believe the play will meet with no 
ordinary success. 

SYNOPSIS: Karl Casterline, Irish po- 
liceman, loses his job and goes into the 
country, hiring out as laborer on the 
farm of Adolf Bauer, German sympa- 
thizer. Here he falls in love with Mina, 
the daughter, and learns of a plan to 
blow up a troop train. Frustrating the 
plan he is charged with murder and sen- 
tenced to death. The events which lead 
to his vindication and release, after a 
sensation of national scope has been 
made of the case, his marriage to Mina 
and the punishment of the German plot- 
ters in the little German town make up 
the body of the story. 



Theda Bara in 

WHEN MEN DESIRE 

Five Part Drama; Fox. 
Directed by J. Gordon Edwards. 
Published March 9. 

OPINION: To be of interest at this 
time the play that revolves about the 
recent war, German cruelty and their 
famous spy system, must have the very 
best of preparation and a story of great 
strength to its credit. Such a play is 
the present, and it can hardly be said to 
possess these qualities in measure suffi- 
cient to overcome the popular aversion. 
Those who recall "For Liberty," a Fox 
feature of a year or more ago, will be 
struck with the similarity of the two. 
Practically the same plot has been used', 
a more pronounced application to the 
American side of the theme being prac- 
tically the only difference. Theda Bara 
is neither better nor worse than usual 
in the leading role. The lesser charac- 
ters are given to a cast which classifies 
as acceptable, but make no notable 
achievements. To put it briefly, the 
picture is just exactly what the title 
indicates, plus a great deal of "Ger- 
man spy stuff." The box office value, 
therefore, can be determined only by 
the exhibitor's knowledge of his pa- 
trons' likes and dislikes. 
. SYNOPSIS: Robert Stedon, Amer- 
ican diplomatic attache, leaves Ger- 
many when war is declared, but Marie 
Lohr, his sweetheart, is detained by the 
covetous Major von Rohn. For a year 
he tries to force her to marrv him. 
Then, by a lucky chance, she is enabled 
to impersonate a lady spy and reaches 
the frontier, only to be detained again. 
She gets word of her predicament to 
Stedon, in Switzerland, and he flies 
across the border to her rescue. Ma- 
jor von Rohn appears at the border and 
forces his attentions upon Marie. At 
the last moment Robert rescues her and 
they reach their machine in safety, fly- 
ing back to safety and liberty. 

Louise Huff in 

CROOK OF DREAMS 

Five Part Drama; World. 
D : rected by Oscar Apfel. 
Published March 8. 

OPINION: Oscar Apfel, director, is in 
the main responsible for the pleasant 
impression left behind by this new pic- 
tur-'zation of a plot that has been done 
before. His arrangement of develop- 
mental incident and the grace with which 
he has made one lead into another for 
the easy continuity of the whole makes 
a photoplay which requires no effort to 
absorb and yields a fairly satisfying 



35 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




measure of entertainment. Louise Huff 
gives a standard portrayal to a standard 
role. Frank Mayo, as is his custom, 
does no more than is required of him, 
yet does that well. Into the rather dingy 
story has been woven a thread of humor 
which brightens it considerably.^ some 
subtitles in slang possessing real "laugh- 
getting" qualities. There is that about 
the title which incites a certain curiosity. 
It makes the reader look twice, then 
wonder why there is not more of it. Con- 
vinced that it is written correctly, there 
remains a curiosity to know what it is 
all about. No doubt many will come to 
find out, and these the play will please. 

SYNOPSIS: A certain Mrs. Waldron 
hovers on the verge of insanity, pending 
the return of a child stolen during its 
infancy. Constance, held in the tene- 
ment home of Sam, an underworld char- 
acter, and his mother, is brought by that 
person to Mrs. Waldron and finally ac- 
cepted as her own. All goes well until 
Charles Hadwin falls in love with Con- 
stance. At length convincing herself 
that she is doing right, Constance be- 
comes engaged to him. It is then 
brought out that she really is the child 
stolen as a baby, the marriage proceeds 
and all ends happily. 



Bryant Washburn in 

POOR BOOB 

Five part comedy-drama; Paramount. 
Directed by Donald Crisp. 
Published March 9. 

OPINION: If Simpson Hightower's 
ancestors were anything like him it is 
hard to understand how they ever ac- 
quired a canning factory which remained 
in the family for two generations. But 
that's probably another story and Zellah 
Covington and Margaret Mayo, the au- 
thors of "Poor Boob," know the answer. 
Nevertheless they have furnished an 
amusing though not highly original story 
and Donald Crisp, with the aid of a 
splendid cast, has made an exceedingly 



interesting hour's entertainment out of 
material that has served many another 
director. 

Bryant Washburn does not fit into the 
"hick" role as well as his co-worker, 
Charles Ray, and while he vests the part 
of Simpson Hightower with a certain 
amount of naturalness, still he belies in 
looks the stupid, error-making clerk and 
the character he plays in "Poor Boob" 
will add little to his fame. 

The work of the cast, however, is ex- 
cellent. We have an entirely new and 
intimate view of Wanda Hawley; a lively, 
vivacious and resourceful Miss Hope she 
is indeed. Dick Rosson as Jimmy, Theo- 
dore Roberts as the blustering Piatt and 
Raymond Hatton as Stephen Douglas 
are irresistible. Comedy touches add a 
fast finish to routine excitement of the 
piece. 

SYNOPSIS : Simpson Hightower, known 
as "Simp," leaves his home town a fail- 
ure. He has been cheated out of the 
local canning factory, which has been 
in the family for two generations, by 
Stephen Douglas. Douglas also wins 
the girl of Simp's dreams. Tiny. _ Simp 
goes to New York and gets a job in 
Piatt's Provision Factory. This he holds 
for a considerable time, until he makes 
one of his usual bonehead mistakes and 
is fired. Piatt's stenographer, Hope, who 
has become fond of Simp, concocts a 
scheme to re-establish him. Part of her 
scheme is that he go to a near by town 
posing as a millionaire, while she will be 
his secretary, and Jimmy, the office boy, 
his valet. Simp' decides on Hightower, 
his home town. The town makes great 
preparations for the return of its suc- 
cessful son, and Simp arrives, welcomed 
by prominent citizens. Then his luck 
starts to turn. He is enabled to close a 
contract for Piatt, his old employer, for 
which he gets a commission of five thou- 
sand dollars. Douglas, who has let the 
canning factory go to pieces, is willing 
to sell out for this amount. Simp buys 
the place and immediately afterwards is 
approached by Piatt, who has received 
word that his own factory has been 
burned down. As he can't fill the con- 



tract, he demands the return of his five 
thousand. But Simp takes over the con- 
tract, borrows money from the town 
banker, and is well on the road to for- 
tune. As he has seen his boyhood sweet- 
heart, Tiny, who now weighs two hun- 
dred pounds, his youthful illusion has 
faded, and he begins to look upon Hope 
with the eyes of love. 



Hazel Daly in 

A WILD GOOSE CHASE 

Five Part Drama; Triangle. 
Directed by Harry Beaumont. 
Published March 2. 

OPINION: So far out of the ac- 
customed channels of photoplay con- 
struction is this story of Arctic explor- 
ers and expeditions that it makes a 
claim upon the attention that will not 
be denied. Technically, it will not pass 
a rigid inspection. The photography is 
often dim. The subtitles do not all 
occur at precisely the correct instant. 
But it is the refreshing unfamiliarity of 
the locale and the action that engages 
the mind. Hazel Daly is quite mistress 
of her role. Matt Moore is ideally cast 
as her hero. Sidney Ainsworth is more 
than equal to the impersonation of the plot- 
ter and pursuer. The minor members of 
the cast figure so slightly in the story 
that they escape notice. Unusual it cer- 
tainly is. And that is the aspect of the 
thing which will decide its fate when 
submitted to the public. 

SYNOPSIS: Eric Heddon, about to 
leave on a polar expedition, declares 
his love for Margaret Sherwood. She 
promises to wait for him until his re- 
turn. Two years later they learn of the 
failure of the expedition and the return 
of the four surviving members. But a 
wild goose flies from the North, lands, 
and brings a message from Eric. She 
persuades Price Latham to fit out a 
searching party, promising to marry him 
if Eric is not found. In the North they 
come upon Eric's tracks and as they 
seem about to find him, Price betrays 
the confidence she has placed in him 
and exacts a promise of marriage 
whether or not they find Eric. Des- 
perate, she consents. Eric is found. 
Then occurs a shortage of food. Price's 
attempt to steal all the provisions that 
are available and flee, results in his death 
at the hand of an Eskimo and the re- 
union of Eric and Margaret. 

Business Increases 

As Ford Serial Runs 

R. C. Cropper, of the Bee-Hive Ex- 
changes, Chicago, Indianapolis and Mil- 
waukee, reports bookings for Francis 
Ford's latest serial, "The Silent Mys- 
tery," to be steadily increasing with each 
succeeding week. 

R. F. Oekler, Casino theatre, Chicago, 
Mr. Cropper states, broke his house at- 
tendance receipts record on the first 
episode and upon the showing of the 
second episode broke the first record in 
both attendance and receipts, playing to 
2,563 people into the house with a seat- 
ing capacity of 300. Mr. Oekler reports 
that people stood in line and waited for 
over an hour to get in and he was com- 
pelled to ask assistance of the police to 
handle the crowds. The Milwaukee of- 
fice reports a like instance and the In- 
dianapolis office adds that a house where 
the serial was booked for the matinee 
only ran it all day and thereafter it will 
be shown one day a week as the only pic- 
ture and as the feature for the remaining 
fourteen episodes. 



36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Robert Gordon Will 
Be Leading Man for 
Bessie Love in Film 

Bessie Love will introduce a new lead- 
ing man when she appears in her April 
picture, which, it is now announced, will 
be called "A Yankee Princess." Robert 
Gordon, best remembered for his recent 
portrayal of Huckleberry Finn in "Huck 
and Finn" and "Tom Sawyer," opposite 
Jack Pickford, makes his Vitagraph de- 
but in this production. 

"A Yankee Princess" is well under 
way at the California studios of Vita- 
graph. It is a story dealing with the 
noveau riche and develops a startling 
climax inasmuch as the pretenders, who 
pose and strut about with heirlooms, 
bought but not inherited, as a back- 
ground, foil the man who seeks to ex- 
pose them and find the rightful owner 
of the coronetcy in question. 

David Smith, director of Miss Love, 
considers the story especially fitted for 
Miss Love. He also considers Robert 
Gordon well suited for the role assigned 
him as Miss Love's leading man. 

Mr. Gordon, aside of his appearances 
in the Jack Pickford films, is remem- 
bered for his work in J. Stuart Black- 
ton's "Missing" and "Captain Kidd, Jr.," 
in which he appeared in support of Mary 
Pickford. His motion picture experi- 
ence began while a senior at college, 
where he had distinguished himself as 
dramatist and player in the amateur 
productions put on by his class. His 
work before the camera was interrupted 
when he enlisted in the army. 



Clarine Seymour Given 

Judgment for $1,325 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— Judge Taft 
gave judgment for $1,325 in favor of Miss 
Clarine Seymour, a film actress suing the 
Rollin Film Company for $8,000 for alleged 
breach of contract. The company, through 
Attorney Morrison, declared that Miss Sey- 
mour did not obey the orders of Director 
Harry E. Roach. She complained about 
taking off her shoes and walking on stones ; 
she was late at rehearsal and tardy in 
other respects, they alleged. 



FILM EXPORTS DURING DECEMBER 

Table Prepared by Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce 
Showing Exports of Exposed and Not Exposed Film From 
United States to All Parts of World 



Countries — Linear Ft. 

Denmark 

Prance 9,901,373 

Iceland 

Spain 

England 53,297 

Bermuda /■ 

British Honduras 

Canada 411,033 

Panama 

Mexico 

Newfoundland and Labrador 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Argentina 304,963 

Brazil 

Chile 

British Guiana 265 

China 

British India 

Straits Settlements 

Dutch East Indies 

Japan 648,394 

Russia in Asia 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Philippine Islands 

British South Africa 



-Not Exposed- 



Dollars 
202' 731 



-Exposed- 



Total 11,319,325 



2,132 



11,902 



8,477 



18,24 i 



243,512 



Linear Ft. 
403,237 
162,777 
6,400 
130,702 
1,590,860 
118,000 
24,300 
963,339 
50,714 
10 

157,514 
312,764 
.',360 
974,560 
143.S4S 
127,432 




19,532 
216,721 
* 113,381 
44,000 



1,150 
14,410 
7,420 
1..60 



34,000 
1,521,378 
202,663 
233.993 
3,173 

7,564,658 




DeVry Solves Problem 

For Cleveland Office 

Irwin Hirsch, manager of the Triangle 
Exchange at Cleveland, Ohio, is able to 
show his customers his wares, despite 
the fact that his new offices in Cleve- 
land are not large enough to give space 
for a projection room. 

He purchased a DeVry portable pro- 
jection machine, and writes as follows: 

"I have fitted up my private office with 
a small screen and purchased a DeVry 
projector. Whenever I want to show a 
picture to an exhibitor or to review a 
new subject myself all that is necessary 
is to pull down the shades and put the 
reel on the machine and press the but- 
ton. I get equally as good a projection 
as any first class theatre and not only 
save the rent of a special projection 
room, but can be right at my desk while 
the picture is going on. For exchange 
purposes I think that a DeVry machine 



590,818 

is an excellent investment, particularly 
as it is motor driven, fireproof and elimi- 
nates the expense of an operator." 

Actor Goes on Road 

Frank Wood, late leading man with 
Thanhouser, assistant director with Par- 
amount and World, has joined the sell- 
ing force of Goldwyn, attached to the 
New York exchange. Mr. Wood says he 
is the first salesman with studio experi- 
ence to go on the road. 



Bert Ennis 111 Again 

The renowned publicity expert, Bert 
Ennis of S. L. Pictures, has been con- 
fined to his home for the past week or 
two with a recrudescence of the "flu." 



Kennedy Serial Ready 

"The Carter Case," the Craig Ken- 
nedy serial featuring Herbert Rawlin- 
son and Margaret Marsh, will be pub- 
lished March 17. 




37 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



■'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi mild ii iiiii mi mi iiiimiiinii mill n mi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin mi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii minimum iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimini m 



Heraldgrams 



fi iiiiiiiiiiiimiiniimii i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin i mini 



By J. R. M. 



mi liiiiiiilliiiiiiiiiNiil i iiiiiiimiiiuim miinii iiiiimminiiiiiiiili: 



It seems the "Big Four" have their 
Price. His full name is Oscar A. 



The high cost of paging in the Alex- 
andria lobby, Los Angeles, is being in- 
vestigated by a committee of well known 
comedians. Publicity comes high some- 
times. 



The Chicago Journal prints a review 
of a picture called "A Touch of Life." 
Hadn't heard of it before, although we 
have suffered many touches in life. Must 
be an exclusive review. 



Same paper says' Clara Joel "will be 
seen in support of Elmo Lincoln, having 
deserted the stage for the camera." 
Thought she was with S-L Pictures. 
How about it, "Virginia"? 



Now that we have wireless phones, do 
you suppose the hello girls will have the 
nerve to tell us that the air is busy? 



After viewing a performance of the 
Hatton play, "The Squab Farm," a New 
York newspaper sent a correspondent to 
the coast to look into the morals of the 
film colony. The "squab expert" reports 
that the driven snow is no purer. 



'Ole" the other day by a person who 
didn't want to blow $2 on the DeWolf 
Hopper show if he could see it all in the 
film for two bits. Our advice was not 
to miss the pic. 



California wants to make it a criminal 
offense to have "hold out" crowds in 
theatre lobbies. It's easy to see those 
legislators never felt the thrill of sat- 
isfaction that chases up and down a 
showman's spine when these rare occa- 
sions come along. 



Jim Corbett, star of the Universal 
serial, "The Midnight Man," says not 
only are all press agents liars, but they 
are dangerous liars and to protect him- 
helf he has to turn press agent himself 
in self-defense. So have a care, you 
P. A.'s. 



No, Miss Swanson, "The Better 'Ole" 
was not written by a Swede, it is not a 
Swede's play, and was not named after 
the mayor of Seattle. 



'Tis said Zukor is still figuring up the 
losses on "My Cousin." These poor re- 
lations are expensive sometimes. 



We were asked which was "The Better Yes, dear reader, Rothapfel plans to 



furnish everything but the audience — 
even a neatly lettered "S. R. O." sign. 



_ Well, anyway, President Wilson is giv- 
ing the news weekly boys a lot of "copy" 
for their screen extras. 



The exhibitors used to get together 
and hold expositions and "shake down 
the manufacturers," says one trade 
paper, and the well known manufacturers 
charged the cost of such affairs to ad- 
vertising which was added to the cost of 
films, says an exhibitor reader, which 
about evened up the score. 



It is reported all the tailors of Detroit 
turned out to see Harry Garson's film, 
"The Unpardonable Sin." If it "fits" in 
Detroit it will be shown in New York 
and Chicago. 



Gertrude Atherton says "the movies 
get worse every day." She sold the 
rights to her book, "The Avalanche," to 
Famous Players-Lasky last week. 



According to Channing Pollock, Cosmo 
Hamilton "detests the movies." But ap- 
parently he doesn't detest the producers' 
checks he receives for the screen rights 

to his stories. 



Harry's Happy 

Harry L. Reichenbach, the dynamic 
picture producer, is now located at 516 
Fifth Avenue. New York, and reports 
excellent results to date on his produc- 
tion "W'hom the God Would Destroy." 



THOMAS H. INCE 

KAY- BEE 
WESTERNS 




Charles Ray 
"THE CLUE" 

Sessue Hayawaka 

"THE RED-SKIN DUEL" 

Anna Little and J. Barney Sherry 
"UNDER THE BIG TOP" 

Clara Williams 
"TRAPPED" 

Gladys Brockwell 

"STACKED CARDS" 

Richard Stanton and Margaret Gibson 
"THE GOLDEN TRAIL" 

Rhea Mitchell 

"THE PHANTOM EXTRA" 



FIRST 
7 LUCKY 
WESTERNS 

ONE EVERY OTHER WEEK 

BEE HIVE EXCHANGE 



BOOK THEM NOW 



CHICACO 

MILWAUKEE 

INDIANAPOLIS 



38 



IS THE EXHIBITOR A MERCHANT? 



"S 



URE," will be the answer of a lot of readers. "He is an amusement merchant: 

Sounds true, too, at first sight. Technically it may be true. But 

Listen ! 



Why cai't he do the same thing? 

Stars, directors and stories vary too much for that. Then we can't rely upon 

Rather risky. 

It's going to hustle us, 



Heine Pickles, Skinner's Satins and the Gillette Safety Razor are staple articles of merchandise. They are products of known 
standing. 

The merchant has but to print the name of the product in large enough type, affix his name as agent and rest content in the knowledge 
that people desiring the best in those lines will come to his store to buy them. 

They may come today, tomorrow or next week. It is all the same to the merchant. As long as he sells the stuff some time, he can't 

lose. 

Pretty soft, eh? 

Nothing like the exhibitor job, is it? 
Still, the exhibitor is just a merchant of amusement. 
Let's see. 

There is no such thing as a "staple brand" of pictures, 
the manufacturer's name to get us the business. 
Can we use the star's reputation? 

Well, that is better. But he may jump his contract and go over to our opposition's program next week 
And there's another thing. 
We've got to sell this picture today! 

We've got another one coming tomorrow and we have to get this one out of the way and work on that one 
too. 

And that isn't all. 

We've got to convince "the man in the street" that lie wants to see this picture. We not only have to make him think it is the best 
picture in town, we have to make him believe that he will not be happy until he has seen it. 

And we've got to do the same thing tomorrow, the next day, end every day thereafter until we sell out, close up or die. 
Considerable prospect, isn't it? 

No wonder the exhibitor is always a busy man. No wonder he wants to throw a film salesman oi.t of the lobby every time one of 
them comes into sight. No wonder he is often grouchy. 

Obviously, the thing .cannot be done according to the outline of the above. It would kill a man in no time to keep up the pace that 
plan would call for. 

There ought to be a better way. 
There is a better way. 

A Plan That Will Work 

The big factor in the difficulty of the 
exhibitor as a merchant is the fact that 
he has no stock in trade. He has a store 
but nothing to sell. That is, nothing 
permanent. He deals in perishables only. 

Such is the conclusion which must 
be drawn. 

But why not create a stock in trade? 
It can be done. 
It has been done. 

Since it is impracticable to approach, 
convince and sell each individual cus- 
tomer each and every day, let us sell 
them something that they may keep. 

The successful exhibitor is the one zvho 
sells his personality, as reflected in his 
I house and in his method of putting on his 
shozv. 

To use the obvious illustration, that is 
what Rothapfel did. 

We can't all be Rothapfels, because we 
haven't all got Rialtos and Rivolis to 
work with. 

But what he did on a big scale we can 
all do on a smaller one. 

And as we succeed or fail in impress- 
ing with our own personality, our own 
way of putting on pictures, just so will 
we succeed or fail in our business. 

First — Put on your pictures with a 
style all your own. 



met N I * 3s * ' y n *» * I ' 




You have heard of Pantheon 'As an luea' 
Soma know of Pantheon 'Ai an Idea' 
Acquaintance with Pantheon 'Ai an Idea' 
Afford! visual evidence of Quality offerings 



Second — Be sure that that style pleases 
the public. 

Third — Remind the public of it at every 
opportunity. 

On this page we reproduce the ad- 
vertisement of the Pantheon, Lubliner 
and Trinz's favorite Chicago theatre. 
Without commenting upon the quality 
of the ad as a whole or even upon the 
central idea we direct your attention to 
the use of "As an idea," the phrase which 
has appeared in every bit of publicity 
which this theatre has put out since its 
opening. 

The phrase is now characteristic, of 
the theatre. It is a constant reminder to 
those who have attended one of their 
performances of the style of presenta- 
tion which is typically the Pantheon's. 

It may or may not be the best means 
that could have been chosen to bring 
home to the reader the personality of 
the management, but it is a move in the 
right direction. It is the policy that 
will win. 

NOT A CATCH LINE 
There is more to the thing than a 
mere catchline. 

Exhibitors, since the birth of the trade, 
have used a single line in every ad and 
in every bit of publicity. 
"Follow the crowd." 
"The home of the mirror screen." 
"Where everybody goes." 
These are veterans. They've served 
exhibitors the country over. Exhibitors 
have traded them about, rebuilt them. 



39 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



AN EXHIBITORS MUTUAL POSTER 

















SE55UE HAYAKAWA - TSURI AOKI 

A HEART IN PAWN 



HA'a'OtfTH PiCTUK.' CORPORATION 



One of the unique twenty-tour sheets used for "A Heart in Pawn," Sessue HayakaivaN 
latest produetion. The figures are in black against a warm, luminous yellow 



printed them in various fancy letterings 
until they mean nothing. Their use to- 
day is really more harmful than bene- 
ficial. It stamps the exhibitor as unorig- 
inal, old fashioned. 

The same, after a little time, will be 
found true of any catchline or slogan 
adopted as thoughtlessly and with as 

little real purpose. 

"As an idea," the Pantheons contri- 
bution will not wear out. 

It will not be copied. Of what use 
would it be to copy a line which in itselt 
means nothing? What exhibitor would 
be tempted? , 

"As an idea" means nothing to the 
new reader. Coming upon it in his scan- 
ning of the newspaper, the casual reader 
gets no definite message. It suggests 
something. But it tells nothing. 

It suggests that the Pantheon ^op- 
erated upon a basis born of some idea 
which is new, different. . 

It does not tell what that idea is, nor 
how it is carried out in the operation ot 
the theatre. 

The result is one of two things. 

The reader carries away with him a 
curiosity. The curiosity may or may not 
result in his going to the Pantheon. 

If he does not go, it cannot be claimed 
that the use of the line in the ad kept 
him away. He would not have gone 

^iThe' does go, either then or at any 
later date, from that curiosity or from 
any other motive, he will recall the line. 
He will give especial attention to the 
management of the theatre. 

If it pleases him he is a customer from 
that time on. Further than that, he feels 
a certain sense of being 'in on the se- 
cret" When a friend comments inquis- 
itively upon one of the Pantheon s ads, 
and a line which leaves something to 
the imagination is the kind that excites 
comment, he is glad to be able to explain 

the line. 

He is not only a customer. 

He is a business builder. 

He is a walking advertisement for the 
theatre. 

So much for the Pantheon. 

Now, how about your theatre? 

Have you anything in your publicity 
which exerts such an effect? 

Don't say if you have nothing ot the 
sort "We can't all use the same method 
or none of them will be of value. 

That is true. If every ad in the paper 
contained some such line, the individual- 
ity would be gone. The advantage of 
dissimilarity would be lost. 

But there are other methods. 



First, of course, comes the necessity 
of having a really individual show. That 
is a matter each exhibitor must think 
out for himself. It must be original. It 
must be unique. 

Then utilize, form, type, display a char- 
acteristic cut, phraseology, outline, any 
of the factors that go into the making of 
an ad, to express your individuality. 

It can be done. It will take ingenuity. 

But it is worth it. 



Beranger Scenarios on 

World March Schedule 

Three productions in as many weeks, 
for all of which the scenarios were fur- 
nished by Clara S. Beranger, have been 
scheduled by World Pictures. 

The first of the three is "The Unveil- 
ing Hand," which has been announced 
for March 10th. It stars Kitty Gordon. 
The second is on the World list for 
publication March 17, and is called "The 
Hand Invisible." Montagu Love is the 
star of the production. The third is 
"Hit or Miss," starring Carlyle Black- 
well. It is scheduled for March 24. 

Miss Beranger, it was announced this 
week, is to do at least one continuity a 
month for Famous Players-Lasky. She 
is now busy on "The Firing Line," by 
Robert W. Chambers, for that organi- 
zation. 



Tom Ince Engages New 

Players for Paramount 

Lloyd Hughes has been signed by 
Thomas H. Ince on a long contract to 
work in Paramount pictures produced by 
Mr. Ince at his new Culver City studio. 
Mr. Hughes is only 21, comes from Bisbee, 
Ariz., and has been attending Polytechnic 
in Los Angeles. Mr. Ince saw him doing a 
bit of atmosphere in a picture and was so 
impressed by his work that Jie makes his 
debut in Paramount pictures shortly as 
leading man for Enid Bennett. 

William Conklin, who has appeared in 
many motion pictures in leading and char- 
acter parts, has also been signed by Mr. 
Ince and among others under contract to 
appear in Ince pictures for Paramount are 
Douglas MacLean, Doris Lee and Otto 
Hoffman. W. G. Gilmour has been made 
studio superintendent at the Thomas Ince 
plant. 

40 



Retain O. Henry Title 

The title of the O. Henry story "The 
Unknown Quantity" will be retained 
for the screen version by Vitagraph. 
Corinne Griffith will be featured. Tom 
Mills is directing the picture. 



Lytell's Next Picture 

Bert Lytell's next picture is based upon 
two of the Boyle tales, "Boston Blackie's 
Mary" and "Fred, the Count," which ap- 
peared in recent issues of the Red Book. 
Finis Fox made the scenario and John 
Ince will direct the production. 



Stone to Make Series 

World Pictures announce that they 
have signed contracts which give them 
the distribution of eight pictures to be 
made during the coming twelve months 
bv Lewis S. Stone. 



Singer Now Manager 



HOLTVILLE, CAL.— Frank R. Jones 
of El Centro, who formerly appeared at 
the Arcade theatre as singer, has pur- 
chased the playhouse and will act as 
manager. 



Closed Four Months 



ELSTON, PA.— The Star theatre of 
this city opened for business again Feb- 
ruary 15, after being closed since early 
last October when the influenza epidemic 
started. 



Pathe Back in Portland 



PORTLAND, ORE.— Pathe is to re- 
open an exchange in this city which was 
closed some time ago when an office was 
opened in Seattle. B. J. Sperry, manager, 
will have seven assistants. 



Band Purchases Theatre 



GRISWOLD, IA.— The Griswold band 
has purchased the Strand theatre and will 
conduct a motion picture show, the 
profits of which will go towards financing 
their organization. 

Pictures in Schools 



GUYNION, TEX.— The senior class 
has presented the high school with a 
motion picture machine. 




SESSUE HAYAKAWA 

i Pathetic Scene from the Robertson- 
Cole Picture, "Hearts in Pawn" 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



"What the Picture Did For Me" 

VERDICTS ON FILMS IN LANGUAGE OF EXHIBITOR 

Copyright, 1919 



The criticisms contained in this department of Exhibitors Herald and Motography are truthful statements relative 
to the actual box office value of the pictures. If the picture you wish to know about is not included, write Exhibitors 
Herald and Motography and the information will be sent you promptly. Using blank form on last page of department, 
write us your experience with the pictures you are showing. Address Exhibitors Herald and Motography, 417 South 
Dearborn street, Chicago, III. 



American 

When a Man Rides Alone, with Will- 
iam Russell — Great. Best picture we 
have had. Make more like it. Big busi- 
ness. — Lewis & Brisco, Princess The- 
atre, Elwood, Mo. — General patronage. 

When a Man Rides Alone, with Will- 
iam Russell. — Drew big business. Rus- 
sell a good bet always. — Leo F. Keiler, 
Arcade Theatre, Paducah, Ky. — Mixed 
patronage. 

Money Isn't Everything, with Marga- 
rita Fisher — Very good picture. Star 
fine. — Lewis & Brisco, Princess Theatre, 
Elwood, Ind. — General patronage. 

All the World to Nothing, with Will- 
iam Russell — Fine picture. Russell draws 
well. — Leo F. Keiler, Arcade Theatre, 
Paducah, Ky. — Mixed patronage. 

Artcraft 

Shark Monroe, with William S. Hart 
— Unusually good. Has a great punch 
at the last. — E. L. Franck, Oasis The- 
atre, Ajo, Okla. — Border mining town. 

The Great Love, a Griffith production 
— Three days at top prices, put on like 
a circus, symphony orchestra. Pleased 
and got the money. — Ben L. Morris,. 
Olympic Theatre, Bellaire, O. — General 
patronage. 

Bound in Morocco, with Douglas Fair- 
banks — About 3,500 feet of good Fair- 
banks material. We paid tax on five 
reels. — A. D. Stanchfield, Rae Theatre, 
Ann Arbor, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

Old Wives for New, Demille Special — 
Showed two nights. Good house both 
nights. Play took well. — Chas. B. Dean, 
Empress Theatre, Leeds, N. D. — Small 
town patronage. 

Bound in Morocco, with Douglas Fair- 
banks. — Good. Advise to book a good 
two-reel subject with it. — P. K. Anton, 
Royal Theatre, New Castle, Ind. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The Danger Mark, with Elsie Fergu- 
son — A picture with merit in all details. 
— C. M. Kellogg, Homestake Theatre, 
Lead, S. D. — Mixed patronage. 

Arizona, with Douglas Fairbanks — 
Fairbanks always gets the crowds. Pic- 
ture O. K. — Mrs. Lon Bacon, Pastime 
Theatre, Itasca, Tex. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

Selfish Yates, with William S. Hart- 
Action too slow. Scenery fine. Busi- 
ness fair. — S. C. Vale, Dennison, O. — 
General patronage. 

M'Liss, with Mary Pickford — Excel- 
lent. Our patrons enjoyed this one. 
Subtitles very funny. — Clay H. Powers, 
Strand Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 



The Squaw Man, De Mille Special 
— Get it. Bill it heavy. Charge extra 
and play for double your usual run. You 
can't go wrong. — C. A. Krause, Empress 
Theatre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best class of 
patronage. 

Private Peat, with Private Harold 
Peat — Most all our regular patrons dis- 
appointed. Those who seldom come ex- 
cept to pictures of the kind were satis- 
fied. — Mrs. Lon Bacon, Pastime The- 
atre, Itasca, Tex. — Small town patron- 
age. 

The Great Love, a Griffith production 
- — This went over good for us two days. 
Good music will help it. — P. K. Anton, 
Royal Theatre, New Castle, Ind. — Mixed 
patronage. 

onmmMBBimiiiiiiiianiHmiiiiiii iiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiimmiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifniinttu^ 

I Report Dep't. Helps 

On Booking Films j 

J - UNIQ UE THE A TRE 
I Bussey, Idaho j 

I To EXHIBITORS HERALD | 
AND MOTOGRAPHY:' 
We appreciate your magazine § 
I very much. Your department, j 
I "What the Picture Did for Me," § 
I helps us a great deal in reaching | 
I decisions on what pictures to § 
I book. I 
I Yours very truly, j 

(Signed) W. K. Stull, 
I Unique Theatre, 

Bussey, Idaho. 
1 I 
niiMiiinniM 

Rose of the World, with Elsie Fergu- 
son — Production very good. Story very 
poor. Star no favorite here. — C. M. Kel- 
logg, Homestake Theatre, Lead, S. D. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The Great Love, a Griffith production 
Not up to standard for Griffith.— D. B. 
Follett, Star Theatre, Gibsonburg, O. — 
Middle class patronage. 

The Greatest Thing in Life, with Dor- 
othy Gish and Robert Harron — Ex- 
traordinary attraction. A positive clean- 
up for the exhibitor who puts it over 
right. Ran it at advanced prices. S. 
R. O. sign both nights. — M. H. Carey, 
Majestic Theatre, Willmar, Minn. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

Say, Young Fellow, with Douglas 
Fairbanks — Pleased capacity business. 
Many favorable remarks from patrons. 
— A. D. Stanchfield, Rae Theatre, Ann 
Arbor, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 



Bluebird 

Set Free, with Edith Roberts— Star 
good. Picture just fair. No drawing 
power. — Will F. Krahn, Lorin Theatre, 
Berkeley, Cal. — Suburban patronage. 

All Night, with Carmel Myers — Fair 
comedy drama. — J. Cairns, Bandbox 
Theatre, Detroit, Mich. — Mixed patron- 
age. 

The Eagle, with Monroe Salisbury — 
Good story. Star always gets business. 
— J. S. Welsh, Star Theatre, Shreveport, 
La. — Colored patronage. 

The Cabaret Girl, with Ruth Clifford 
— Good. Miss Clifford at her best. — 
Lewis & Brisco, Princess Theatre, El- 
wood, Mo. — General patronage. 

Come Through, with Herbert Rawlin- 
son — This is a very good picture and 
will please at regular admission prices. 
— Guy W. Johnson, Mystic Theatre, 
Marmarth, N. D. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

That Devil, Batease, with Monroe Sal- 
isbury — Good picture. Excellent scen- 
ery. Audience well pleased. — Joyland 
Theatre, Ozark, Ark. — Mixed patronage. 

Playthings, with Fritzi Brunette — 
Very poor. Star not good. No drawing 
power. — A. S. Widaman, Centennial 
Theatre, Warsaw, Ind. 

My Unmarried Wife, with Carmel 
Myers — Do not know if the picture was 
good or not, as was not able to get any 
sense out of it. — Mrs. Lon Bacon, Pas- 
time Theatre, Itasca, Tex. — Small town 
patronage. 

Beans, with Edith Roberts — A good 
melodrama with lots of comedy. — Ben 
L. Morris, Olympic Theatre, Bellaire, O. 
— General patronage. 

Smashing Through, with Herbert 
Rawlinson — Star fine. Drew well. Pic- 
ture good. Lots of action. — Will F. 
Krahn, Lorin Theatre, Berkeley, Cal. — 
Suburban patronage. 

Exhibitors Mutual 

Impossible Susan, with Margarita 
Fisher — Splendid picture. Pleased all. 
— C. A. Rollins, Wigwam Theatre, Shef- 
field, 111. — General patronage. 

A Game of Wits, with Gail Kane — 
The picture, though old, pleased every 
one who saw it. — Mrs. Lon Bacon, Pas- 
time Theatre, Itasca, Tex. — Small town 
patronage. 

The Richest Girl, with Ann Murdock 
— Say, if Mutual had a heart they would 
have taken this attempt at a picture and 
touched a match to it instead of releas- 
ing it. — C. A. Rollins, Wigwam Theatre. 
Sheffield, 111. — General patronage. 



41 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



The Richest Girl, with Ann Murdock 
— This did not please. I consider it a 
poor picture. — A. C. Klug, Empress The- 
atre, Zumbrota, Minn. — Rural patron- 
age. 

A Square Deal, with Margarita Fisher 
— Enjoyed by every one. Star a draw- 
ing card. — Luedke Sisters, Columbia 
Theatre, Keno, Wis. 

First National 

A Daughter of Destiny, with Olga Pe- 
trova — A good picture. Pleased my pa- 
trons.— D. B. Follett, Star Theatre, Gib- 
sonburg, O. — Middle class patronage. 

Raffles, with John Barrymore — Fine 
picture. — Leo F. Keiler, Arcade The- 
atre, Paducah, Ky. — Mixed patronage. 

Tempered Steel, with Mine. Petrova — 
Nothing to get excited about, but pleased 
two nights. — Ben L. Morris, Olympic 
Theatre, Bellaire, O. — General patron- 
age. 

A Dog's Life, with Charlie Chaplin — 
Great. Roars of laughter all the way. 
Raymond Pifer, Pifer's Opera House, 
Virginia City, Nev. — General patronage. 

Tarzan of the Apes, with Elmo Lin- 
coln — Turned them away. Will repeat 
same. — J. T. Marshall, Colonial Theatre, 
Big Rapids, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Romance of Tarzan, with Elmo 
Lincoln — Better than "Tarzan of the 
Apes." Capacity business. — D. B. Fol- 
lett, Star Theatre, Gibsonburg, O. — 
Middle class patronage. 

Fox 

The Woman Who Gave, with Evelyn 
Nesbit — Business good. Picture fair. 
Lacks pep. — S. C. Vale, Dennison, O. — 
General patronage. 

The Plunderer, with William Farnum 
Very good. Would have been better if 
man in support had not played so much 
of star's part. — Clay H. Powers, Strand 
Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — General pat- 
ronage. 

Peg o' the Pirates, with Peggy Hy- 
land- — Star is good, but the picture is 
poor. It is like a fairy tale and did not 
give satisfaction. — F. J. Gruber, Temple 
Theatre, East Jordan, Mich.— Mixed 
patronage. 

Rough and Ready, with William Far- 
num — A good picture, but not as good 
as "Heart of a Lion." Will please. — 
Harold Daspit, Atherton Theatre, Kent- 
wood, La. — Small town patronage. 

Peck's Bad Girl, with Mabel Normand 
Star very good. Star well cast, with 
good support. My patrons convulsed 
with laughter at situations and captions. 
— C. M. Kellogg, Homestake Theatre, 
Lead, S. D. — Mixed patronage. 

Swat the Spy, with Jane and Kath- 
erine Lee — The play is one continuous 
laugh from the start to finish. — J. T. 
Marshall, Colonial Theatre, Big Rapids, 
Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

Riders of the Purple Sage, with Wil- 
liam Farnum — This picture pleased. 
One of the best we have shown. — J. L. 
Meyers, Liberty Theatre, Ivesdale, 111. — 
Small town patronage. 

Doing Their Bit, with Jane and Kath- 
erine Lee. — A most clever comedy 
drama. The kids' acting great. Cut the 
sob-sister stuff. Get the laughs. And 
the exhibitors can get the patrons. — 
C. M. Kellogg, Homestake Theatre, 
Lead, S. D. — Mixed patronage. 

The Caillaux Case. Fox special. — 



Wonderful production. Star wonderful. 
S. C. Vale, Pictorium Theatre, Denni- 
son, O. — Mixed patronage. 

We Should Worry, with Jane and 
Katherine Lee. — A good picture. — The 
Lee kids are starting to draw business 
for me. — F. J. Gruber, Temple Theatre, 
East Jordan, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

General 

The Gift O' Gab, with Jack Gardner— 
A fine picture. Pleased. — J. L. Meyers, 
Liberty Theatre, Ivesdale, 111. — Small 
town patronage. 

Open Places, with Jack Gardner — 
Excellent Northwestern. Lots of ac- 
tion. Gardner is fine. — Clay H. Powers, 
Strand Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

A Pair of Sixes, with Taylor Holmes. 
— Fine farce comedy. One of the best 
we have found. — E. L. Franck, Oasis 
Theatre, Ajo, Okla. — Border mining 
camp. 

Sadie Goes to Heaven, with Baby Mc- 
Allister. — Delightful picture. Little star 




It's a cru-el world and cold for lots of 
people. Take this scene, for instance, 
from Metro's "The Way of the Strong." 
Anna U. Nilsson is the clinging vine. 

pleases well. — Clay H. Powers, Strand 
Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — -General 
patronage. 

Goldwyn 

The Splendid Sinner, with Mary Gar- 
den — This has a sad ending, therefore I 
rate it as zero in entertainment value. 
The only poor Goldyn picture I have 
played, and have been using them for a 
year. — A. C. Klug, Empress Theatre, 
Zumbrota, Minn.— Rural patronage. 

Just for To-Night, with Tom Moore — 
Clever comedy. — Leo F. Keiler, Arcade 
Theatre, Paducah, Ky. — Mixed patron- 
age. 

Back to the Woods, with Mabel Nor- 
mand — Fine story. Scenery background 
great. You can boost it. — C. M. Kel- 
logg, Lead, S. D. — Mixed patronage. 

Hidden Fires, with Mae Marsh — An- 
other good one. Goldwyn pictures draw 
us full houses and pleases them. What 
more could you want? — C. A. Rollins, 
Wigwam Theatre, Sheffield, 111. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

America's Answer, (Official U. S. 
War) — Too late to draw. No enthu- 

42 



siasm shown. — J. C. LeBell, Family 
Theatre, Portland, N. D.— General 
patronage. 

Shadows, with Geraldine Farrar — One 
of Farrar's best pictures. — Leo F. 
Keiler, Arcade Theatre, Paducah, Ky. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The Fair Pretender, with Madge Ken- 
nedy — Good picture and good business, 
but not up to Miss Kennedy's standard. 
— W. D. Martin, Badger Theatre, Neills- 
ville, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

For the Freedom of the World, with 

E. K. Lincoln — Fair picture. Played it 
too late. Did not draw. — E. L. Franck, 
Oasis Theatre, Ajo, Okla. — Border min- 
ing town. 

A Perfect Lady, with Madge Kennedy 
— Best Kennedy picture that I've ran. 
Pleased all that saw it. Give us more 
like it. — Fred G. Wright, Dreamland 
Theatre, Linton, Ind. — General patron- 
age. 

Joan of Plattsburg, with Mabel Nor- 
mand — Very good, but did not draw as 
well as it should with such a cast. — J. 
T. Marshall, Colonial Theatre, Big 
Rapids. Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Danger Game, with Madge Ken- 
nedy — Just as entertaining as it is possi- 
ble to make a clean picture. Madge 
and Tom Moore are there in this one. — 
Ben L. Morris, Olympic Theatre, Bel- 
laire, O. — General patronage. 

The Face in the Dark, with Mae 
Marsh — Excellent. Fine business and 
well pleased audience. — W. D. Martin, 
Badger Theatre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small 
town patronage. 

The Face in the Dark, with Mae 
Marsh — This pleased a very large audi- 
ence. Mae is a favorite here. — A. C. 
Klug, Empress Theatre, Zumbrota, Minn. 
— Rural patronage. 

Laughing Bill Hyde, with William 
Rogers — Dandy picture, but did not 
draw. — Leo F. Keiler, Arcade Theatre, 
Paducah, Ky. — Mixed patronage. 

Laughing Bill Hyde, with William 
Rogers — Played to capacity and every- 
one seemed pleased. — Fred G. Wright, 
Dreamland Theatre, Linton, Ind. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

Heart of the Sunset, Rex Beach Spe- 
cial — Excellent picture. — E. L. Franck, 
Oasis Theatre, Ajo, Okla. — Border min- 
ing town. 

Hodkinson 

Burglar for a Night, with J. Warren 
Kerrigan — Good mystery story. En- 
joyed by all. "Glad to see Kerrigan 
back" was the chief comment. — Majes- 
tic Theatre, Lexington, Neb. — Small 
town patronage. 

Three X Gordon, with J. Warren Ker- 
rigan — Best picture of Kerrigan. Pa- 
trons very much pleased. Book it. — 
Lewis and Brisco, Princess Theatre, El- 
wood, Mo. — General patronage. 

The White Lie, with Bessie Barri- 
scale — Very good picture. Pleased large 
crowd. Barriscale well liked here. — A. 
C. Klug, Empress Theatre, Zumbrota, 
Minn. — Rural patronage. 

The Heart of Rachel, with Bessie Bar- 
riscale — "Best picture she ever made," 
was our patrons' comment. She is truly 
a fond favorite with our people. Will 
try and get her new releases. — Mrs. J. 
A. Dostal, Ideal Theatre, Omaha, Neb. — 
High class patronage. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Metro 

Paradise Garden, with Harold Lock- 
wood. — Gave good satisfaction. — H. H. 
Billings, Pleasant Hour Theatre, Pine 
Island, Minn. — Small town patronage. 

A Man's World, with Emily Stevens — 
Very good and very interesting subject. 
— Clay H. Powers, Strand Theatre, 
Dunsmuir, Cal. — General patronage. 

His Bonded Wife, with Emmy Weh- 
len. — Star pleasing and the picture 
good. — F. J. Gruber, Temple Theatre, 
East Jordan, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Trail to Yesterday, with Bert 
Lytell — Very good picture. Western 
without too much rough stuff. — E. L. 
Franck, Oasis Theatre, Ajo, Okla. — 
Border mining town. 

Toys of Fate, with Nazimova — Very 
good picture, but drew only a small 
crowd. — A. C. Klug, Empress Theatre, 
Zumbrota, Minn. — Rural patronage. 

Red, White and Blue Blood, with 
Bushman and Bayne — Excellent com- 
edy drama. — E. L. Franck, Oasis Thea- 
tre, Ajo, Okla. — Border mining town. 

The Only Road, with Viola Dana. — 
Picture took well and was well liked. — 
J. T. Marshall, Colonial Theatre, Big 
Rapids, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

My Own United States, with Arnold 
Daly — This is a good picture of its kind, 
but I think it should be shown in school 
rooms or places of like nature. For en- 
tertainment it is no good. — A. C. Klug, 
Empress Theatre, Zumbrota, Minn. — 
Rural patronage. 

The Trail to Yesterday, with Bert Ly- 
tell. — One of the best Westerns I ever 
ran. — L. A. Hasse, Majestic Theatre, 
Mauston, Wis.— Small town patronage. 

The Brass Check, with Bushman and 
Bayne — A very good comedy drama. — 
H. H. Billings, Pleasant Hour Theatre, 
Pine Island, Minn. — Small town patron- 
age. 

The Winning of Beatrice, with May 
Allison — Great picture. Drew only fair. 
Appealed to all who saw it. — Luedke 
Sisters, Columbia Theatre, Keno, Wis. 

Paramount 

Viviette, with Vivian Martin — Fair 
story. Has a queer ending. — Clay H. 
Powers, Strand Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. 
— General patronage. 

Tyrant Fear, with Dorothy Dalton — 
Very good snow scenes in the North 
Woods. Acting perfect. Also a good 
drawing card. — -A. J. Hill, Glen Theatre, 
2852 Armitage avenue, Chicago, 111. — 
Neighborhood patronage. 

The Seven Swans, with Marguerite 
Clark — A fine picture for children and 
enjoyed by grown-ups too. Took well 
here. — Chas. B. Dean, Empress Thea- 
tre, Leeds, N. D. — Small town patron- 
age. 

Love's Conquest, with Lina Cavaliera — 
Nothing but a film with a picture on it. 
Star not a drawing card. — Clay H. Pow- 
ers, Strand Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — 
General patronage. 

Naughty, Naughty, with Enid Bennett 
— A picture that went over with my pa- 
trons better than 90 per cent of the com- 
edy dramas. Why not have more? — C. 
M. Kellogg, Homestake Theatre, Lead, 
S. D. — Mixed patronage. 

The Hope Chest, with Dorothy Gish 
—Very good. It delighted. Dorothy 
Gish will certainly draw if they keep her 



in such as this. — C. A. Krause, Empress 
Theatre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best class of 
patronage. 

Sandy, with Jack Pickford — A story 
suitable for Jack and liked by all his 
fans. — P. K. Anton, Royal Theatre, New 
Castle, Ind. — Mixed patronage. 

Resurrection, with Pauline Frederick 
— Poor. Worse than the others we have 
run. No entertainment value in the 
whole five reels. — Clay H. Powers, 
Strand Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

The Secret Garden, with Lila Lee — 
My people all liked this respecting the 
star. Personally, the story is weak. — 
Mrs. Lon Bacon, Pastime Theatre, 
Itasca, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

Her Final Reckoning, with Pauline 
Frederick — Fine production. A high 
class picture. Weather bad. Business 
fair. — S. C. Vale, Dennison, O.— Gen- 
eral patronage. 

Her Country First, with Vivian Mar- 
tin — Weak. They called it silly. Fair 
business. — W. F. Krahn, Lorin Theatre, 
Berkeley, Cal. 

The Firefly of France, with Wallace 
Reid — An extra fine war picture that will 
please. A little different from the rest. 
— Loefholz Bros., Auditorium Theatre, 
Cuba City, Wis. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

The Mystery Girl, with Ethel Clay- 
ton. — Star is good card and this is fair 
in interest. — C. A. Krause, Empress 
Theatre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best class of 
patronage. 

The Hope Chest, with Dorothy Gish — 
A credit to the star and producer. A 
few complained that it did not follow 
the story. Otherwise an A. No. 1 pro- 
duction. — P. R. Matson, Crystal Theatre, 
Flandreau, S D. — General patronage. 

His Father's Son, with Charles Ray — 
Old picture, but advertised it big and 



drew big crowd. Pleased patrons. — S. 
A. Jamison, Rex Theatre, Ontonagon, 
Mich. — Small town patronage. 

Pathe 

Innocent, with Fannie Ward. — Good, 
but we have run better. — Loeffholz 
Bros., Auditorium Theatre, Cuba City, 
Wis. — Middle class patronage. 

Winning Grandma, with Baby Marie 
Osborne — Baby Marie at her best. 
Work of little Sambo sure did please 
audience. — Mrs. Lizzie E. Ohming, 
Dreamland Theatre, Michigan City, Ind. 
— Mixed patronage. 

Infatuation, with Gaby Deslys — Story 
fair. Photography bad. Picture not 
strong enough to boost. — J. Schainburg, 
American Theatre, Davenport, la. 

The Border Raiders, with George Lar- 
kin — Very poor production. — A. S. Wida- 
man, Centennial Theatre, Warsau, Ind. 

The Recoil, with William Courtenay — 
An extra fine Secret Service picture. — 
Loeffholz Bros., Auditorium Theatre, 
Cuba City, Wis. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

Select 

The Safety Curtain, with Norma Tal- 
madge. — Star and story good. Business 
above average. — E. D. Prigmore, Idle 
Hour Theatre, Charleston, Miss. — Mixed 
patronage. 

Her Great Chance, with Alice Brady — 
Not the best Brady has done, but a good 
production. — A. S. Widaman, Centennial 
Theatre, Warsau, Ind. 

The Secret of the Storm Country, with 
Norma Talmadge — Very old, but a very 
good picture. — E. L. Franck, Oasis 
Theatre, Ajo, Okla. — Mining town. 

The Burden of Proof, with Marion 
Davies — Star not in same class with 
other Select stars. Did not draw at all. 
From class of pictures made so far will 



NORMA'S A TWENTIETH CENTURY GIRL 




In "The Probation Wife" Miss Tnlmadfre lias to study the cook hook, although the 
Seleet press aprent awNiireN iin she really knows a Kreat deal 
about the enllnary art 

43 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



never draw. — Leo F. Keiler, Arcade 
Theatre, Paducah, Ky. — Mixed patron- 
age. 

Good Night Paul, with Constance Tal- 
madge — It is such pictures as this that 
are rapidly bringing this star to the 
front. Each one of Constance Tal- 
madge's productions gives us an in- 
crease in business. — P. R. Matson, Cry- 
stal Theatre, Flandreau, S. D. — General 
patronage. 

Magda, with Clara Kimball Young — 
Extra good production. — D. B. Follett, 
Star Theatre, Gibsonburg, O. — Middle 
class patronage. 

The Knife, with Alice Brady — Excel- 
lent. Gripping. Ran with a Sunshine 
comedy which packed the house to ca- 
pacity. — Clay H. Powers, Strand Thea- 
tre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — General patronage. 

Her Only Way, with Norma Talmadge 
— Fine picture. Business good. — Fred 
G. Wright, Dreamland Theatre, Linton, 
Ind. — General patronage. 

The Savage Woman, with Clara Kim- 
ball Young — Star has suffered a slump 
in attractive powers and pictures like 
this have contributed to her decline. — 
C. A. Krause, Empress Theatre, Owens- 
boro, Ky. — Best class of patronage. 

The Easiest Way, with Clara Kimball 
Young — A good production. Capacity 
business. — D. B. Follett, Star Theatre, 
Gibsonburg, O. — Middle class patronage. 

Her Great Chance, with Alice Brady 
— Everyone well pleased with this. — P. 
K. Anton, Royal Theatre, New Castle, 
Ind. — Mixed patronage. 

The Safety Curtain, with Norma Tal- 
madge — A very good picture indeed. 
Pleased everyone. — M. C Kellogg. 
Homestake Theatre, Lead, S. D. — Mixed 
patronage. 

Cecelia of the Pink Roses, with Ma- 
rion Davies — A fairly good production. 
— D. B. Follett, Star Theatre, Gibson- 
burg, O. — Middle class patronage. 

Good Night Paul, with Constance Tal- 
madge. — Star popular. Story pleased 
large crowd. — E. D. Prigmore, Idle Hour 
Theatre, Charleston, Miss. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

The Cavell Case, with Julia Arthur — 
Good picture if your patrons like war 
pictures. — G. A. Duncan, Lyric Theatre, 
Carlisle, Ky. — Good class of patronage. 

Triangle 

The Silent Rider, with Roy Stewart — 
Book this. It's good. — R. E. Kimmy, 
Pastime Theatre, Merryville, La. — Local 
patronage. 

Little Miss Hoover, with Marguerite 
Clark — Mrs. Lon Bacon, Pastime Thea- 
tre, Itasca, Tex. — Small town patronage. 
Baird, Crystal Theatre, Plattonsburg, 
Mo. — Rural patronage. 

High Tide, with Harry Mestayer — 
One of the poorest Triangle pictures we 
have run. — Mrs. Lizzie E. Ohming, 
Dreamland Theatre, Michigan City, Ind. 
— Middle class patronage. 

Paying His Debt, with Roy Stewart — 
This splendid Western made one press 
sheet good. It's O. K. — Raymond Pifer, 
Pifer's Opera House, Virginia City, Ne- 
vada. General patronage. 

Paying His Debt, with Roy Stewart — 
An extra good Western. Stewart plays 



a double role and it will keep you guess- 
ing. — Loeffholz Bros., Auditorium Thea- 
tre, Cuba City, Wis. — Middle class pat- 
ronage. 

The Pretender, with William Des- 
mond — Very enjoyable. — Mrs. Lon Ba- 
con, Pastime Theatre, Itasca, Tex. — 
Small town patronage. 

Love's Pay Day, with Rosemary The- 
by — Picture good. Box office value 
good.— A. J. Hill, Glen Theatre, 2852 
Armitage avenue, Chicago, 111. — Neigh- 
borhood patronage. 

Double Trouble, with Douglas Fair- 
banks. — Poorest of the Fairbanks pic- 
tures. Too many jumps in the picture 
to keep up with it. — Harold Daspit, 
Atherton Theatre, Kentwood, La. — 
Small town patronage. 

Fighting Back, with William Desmond 
— A mighty good one. Claire Anderson, 
as dance hall girl, makes a hit. All 




ROBERT ANDERSEN 

Famed as "Monsieur Cuckoo" in D. W. Grif- 
fith's "Hearts of the World," Who Will 
Appear In "Fires of Faith," the 
Famous Players-Lasky Salva- 
tion Army Film. 

pleased. — W. D. Martin, Badger Thea- 
tre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

The Law of the Great Northwest, with 
Margery Wilson — Toggle-jointed, crude 
affair. Did please a few unruly kids. — 
Raymond Pifer, Pifer's Opera House, 
Virginia City, Nevada. — General patron- 
age. 

Little Red Decides, with Roy Stewart 
— Good. Had lots say it was best pic- 
ture they ever saw. — J. L. Stapp, Ly- 
ceum Theatre, Platton City, Mo. — High 
class patronage. 

Cactus Crandal, with Roy Stewart — 
Stewart always goes big. Turned them 
away. — Fred G. Wright, Dreamland 
Theatre, Linton, Ind. — General patron- 
age. 

Mile. Paullette, with Claire Anderson 
— Miles of smiles. Pleasing to man, wo- 
man and child alike. Well acted. — Ray- 
mond Pifer, Pifer's Opera House, Vir- 
ginia City, Nevada. — General patronage. 

Limousine Life, with Olive Thomas — 
Not as amusing as Heiress for a Day, 



but better than average entertainment- 
Harold Daspit, Atherton Theatre, Kent- 
wood, La. — Small town patronage. 

Wild Life, with William Desmond — 
Good. Lots of action. Business fair. 
Due to flu scare. — Mrs. Lizzie E. Ohm- 
ing, Dreamland Theatre, Michigan City, 
Ind. — Middle class patronage. 

Heiress for a Day, with Olive Thomas 
— This will make a hit with almost any 
kind of an audience Extra good com- 
edy. — Harold Daspit, Atherton Theatre, 
Kentwood, La. — Small town patronage. 

Universal 

The Wildcat of Paris, with Priscilla 
Dean — Plenty of rough stuff and action. 
Title ought to bring them in. It did for 
us. — Charles H. Ryan, Garfield Theatre, 
2844 Madison street, Chicago, 111. — 
Neighborhood patronage. 

Bread, with Mary MacLaren — A good 
story. Well acted and satisfying to a 
critical audience. — J. J. Harwood, Na- 
tional Theatre, Cleveland, O. — Better 
class patronage. 

Roped, with Harry Carey — Fine pic- 
ture. One of the best I have run. Good 
crowd. Bad weather. Everyone more 
than pleased. — A. M. Leitch, Roval 
Theatre, Milford, la. 

Three Mounted Men, with Harry 
Carey — A fairly good western. Business 
satisfactory. — J. H. McDonald, Strand 
Theatre, Walla Walla, Wash. 

Brazen Beauty, with Priscilla Dean — 
Excellent acting, story and settings. — J. 

C. LeBell, Family Theatre, Portland, N. 

D. — General patronage. 

Rosalind at Redgate, with Ruth Stone- 
house — Poorest picture I've run in 
months. Did fair business on account of 
popularity of the book. — J. B. Stine, Gem 
Theatre, Clinton, Ind. — Mining town. 

Vanity Pool, with Mary MacLaren — 
You won't go wrong on this one. It 
was well received here. — C. E. Waughop, 
Scenic Theatre, Detroit, Minn. — Small 
town patronage. 

The Talk of the Town, with Dorothy 
Phillips — Real business on this and it 
held a big audience from start to finish. 
— Ben L. Morris, Olympic Theatre, Bel- 
laire, O. — General patronage. 

The Craving, with Francis Ford — 
Boost this strong as a novelty. Most 
remarkable photographic work I ever 
saw on the screen. — J. B. Stine, Gem 
Theatre, Clinton, Ind. — Mining town. 

A Wife With a Past, with Priscilla 
Dean — Good in every way. — J. C. Le- 
Bell, Family Theatre, Portland, N. D.— 
General patronage. 

Creaking Stairs, with Mary MacLaren 
— Did fair business though Mary is no 
drawing card here. I consider this her 
best picture. — J. B. Stine, Gem Thea- 
tre, Clinton, Ind. — Mining town. 

Vitagraph 

AH Man, with Harry Morey — Regular 
program picture. — F. J. Gruber, Temple 
Theatre, East Jordan, Mich. — Mixed 
patronage. 

The Man Who Wouldn't Tell, with 
Earle Williams — A splendid Secret Serv- 
ice story. Well acted by star and sup- 
port. Business extra good. — A. J. Hill, 
Glen Theatre, 2852 Armitage avenue, 
Chicago, 111. — Neighborhood patronage. 

The Soap Girl, with Gladys Leslie — 



44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



A good clean picture. — R. E. Kimmy, 
Pastime Theatre, Merryville, La. — Local 
patronage. 

A Woman Between Friends, with 
Alice Joyce — Good picture, but not 
extraordinary. Light business. — W. D. 
Martin, Badger Theatre, Neillsville, Wis. 
— Small town patronage. 

Within the Law, with Alice Joyce- 
Broke house records in our two years 
of business. Second day brought new 
people and had people come again sec- 
ond day to see it again. — Mrs. J. A. Dos- 
tal, Ideal Theatre, Omaha, Neb.— Neigh- 
borhood location. 

The Other Man, with Harry Morey— 
Very good, but they ought to keep 
Morey out of "whiskers." He pleases 
better smooth shaven. — Clay H. Powers, 
Strand Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

By Right of Possession, with Antonio 
Moreno — Fair picture only. — W. D. Mar- 
tin, Badger Theatre, Neillsville, Wis.— 
Small town patronage. 

Wild Primrose, with Gladys Leslie — 
Good one. Star resembles Mary Pick- 
ford so much that many thought it was 
her. — Ben. L. Morris, Olympic Theatre, 
Bellaire, O. — General patronage. 

The Adventure Shop, with Corinne 
Griffith — This star never made us any 
money. People do not like her action 
and walk. She is far from being a good 
actress. — Mrs. J. A. Dostal, Ideal Thea- 
tre, Omaha, Neb.— Neighborhood pat- 
ronage. 

World 

America's Answer (Official U. S. Gov- 
ernment) — Good picture, but patrons did 
not care much for it. — J. L. Meyers, Lib- 
erty Theatre, Ivesdale, 111. — Small town 
patronage. 

America's Answer (Official Govern- 
ment) — Disappointed. Photography fierce. 
—Raymond Pifer, Pifer's Opera House, 
Virginia City, Nevada. — General patron- 
age. 

A Heart of Gold, with Johnny Hines — 
A dandy little story. Will please all. 
World has a nice clean bunch of features 
now . — p. K. Anton, Royal Theatre, New 
Castle, Ind. — Mixed patronage. 

America's Answer (Official Govern- 
ment) — Good of the kind, but war pic- 
tures are dead. — W. D. Martin, Badger 
Theatre, Neillsville, Wis. — Small town 
patronage. 

The Bluffer, with June Elvidge— Much 
better than the usual World picture. 
Most of my patrons spoke well of it. 
Supporting cast is excellent. — Charles 
H. Ryan, Garfield Theatre, 2844 Madi- 
son street, Chicago, 111. — Neighborhood 
patronage. 

By Hook or Crook, with Carlyle 
Blackwell — Mighty clever story. Star 
has a light comedy role that he plays 
to a finish. — A. D. Stanchfield, Rae Thea- 
tre, Ann Arbor, Mich. — Mixed patron- 
age. 

Making the Nation Fit (Official Gov- 
ernment) — Very good of the kind, but 
exchanges ought to begin to realize that 
war pictures are dead. — W. D. Martin, 
Badger Theatre, Neillsville, Wis.— Small 
town patronage. 

T'Other Dear Charmer, with Louise 
Huff — Pleased capacity Saturday busi- 
ness. — A. D. Stanchfield, Rae Theatre, 
Ann Harbor, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 



Specials 

Wives of Men, with Florence Reed — 
Good picture. Star fine. Support good. 
—J. T. Marshall, Colonial Theatre, Big 
Rapids, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Warrior, with Maciste — A won- 
derful picture. Pleased all my patrons. 
— Leo F. Keiler, Arcade Theatre, Padu- 
cah, Ky. — Mixed patronage. 

Sporting Life, a Maurice Tournier pro- 
duction — Good. Excellent. — H. H. Wil- 
son, Sherman Theatre, Sullivan, Ind. — 
High class patronage. 

Hearts of the World, a Griffith pro- 
duction — Eighth day in Ann Harbor and 
capacity to well pleased audiences. — A. 
D. Stanchfield, Rae Theatre, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Grain of Dust, with Lillian Walker 
— Poor picture. Nothing good in it. — 
Leo F. Keiler, Arcade Theatre, Paducah, 
Ky. — Mixed patronage. 

Red Blood and Yellow, with G. M. 
Anderson — On the whole good. Good 
business. Some flaws in direction and 
double exposure rather crude. — J. H. 
MacDonald, Strand Theatre, Walla 
Walla, Wash. — General patronage. 

Enlighten Thy Daughter, with an all- 
star cast — A 100 per cent box office at- 
traction. It is a picture everybody 
should see. Book it. — Loeffholz Bros., 
Auditorium Theatre, Cuba City, Wis. — 
Middle class patronage. 

Wanted for Murder, with Elaine Ham- 
merstein — Falls far short of being high 
class feature. Business good first day 
with heavy advertising. Balance of run 
very poor. — J. H. McDonald, Strand 
Theatre, Walla Walla, Wash. 

The Inn of the Blue Moon, with Doris 
Kenyon — Great and beautiful. Book it. 
This is quality. — Lewis and Brisco, Prin- 
cess Theatre, Elwood, Mo. — General 
patronage. 

Wives of Men, with Florence Reed — 
Florence Reed certainly carved a niche 
for increased popularity in this wonder- 
ful screen play. The women will cer- 
tainly go out and talk about it. You 
could hear a pin drop in our house, so 
tense was the interest. — Chas. H. Ryan, 
Garfield Theatre, 2844 Madison street, 
Chicago, 111. — Neighborhood patronage. 

The Lust of the Ages, with Lillian 
Walker — Poor picture. No one liked it. 
— Leo F. Keiler, Arcade Theatre, Pa- 
ducah, Ky. — Mixed patronage. 

National Board of Review 

Reports 

Why I Would Not Marry (Fox) — En- 
tertainment value, fair; story, insignifi- 
cant; coherence of narrative, loose; 
acting, fair; photography, good; technical 
handling, fair; scenic setting, adequate; 
moral effect, fair. 

The Hell Cat (Goldwyn)— Entertain- 
ment value, fair; story, fair; atmospheric 
value, good; scenic setting, good; acting, 
fair; technical handling, fair; coherence 
of narrative, adequate; photography, 
good; as a whole, fair. 

Love's Pay Day (Triangle) — Enter- 
tainment value, fair; atmospheric value, 
good; scenic setting, good; acting, fair: 
technical handling, fair; coherence of 
narrative, fair; photography, good; as a 
whole, fair. 



What Is the Picture's 

Box Office Value? 



Is the film you are running in your 
theatre a money maker? Pass the 
word on ! Does the picture draw the 
crowds? Tell the exhibitors in the 
other states. They want to book the 
same pictures. Tell them in Exhibi- 
tors Herald and Motography's 
"What the Picture Did for Me" 
department. 

Your box office is the test of 
popularity. Fill in the blank NOW 
and send to Exhibitors Herald and 
Motography, 417 South Dearborn 
street, Chicago. 

Title 

Star 

Producer 

Weather 

How Advertised 

Competition 

Admission Prices 

Remarks 



Name of Theatre 

Transient or Neighborhood Patron- 
age 

Title 

Star 

Producer 

Weather 

How Advertised 

Competition 

Admission Prices 

Remarks 



City and State 
Sent in by 



45 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAP1I Y 



A STAGE PLAY FOR MARGUERITE CLARK 




The popular little Paramount star will next appear in an adaptation of Edward Child* 
Carpenter's stage sueeess, "The Three Bears," to be published Mareh 16 



Exhibitors Declare 
Drew Comedies Are 
Winning Popularity 

A complete follow-up system has been 
inaugurated by the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corporation to ascertain the de- 
mand on the part of the theatre owner 
as well as on the part of the public, for 
the new two-reel Drew comedies be- 
ing published by them. 

This plan was tried out on the first 
release "Romance and Rings" and con- 
sisted of a request to the theatre man- 
agers booking that attraction to have 
the cashier make a note or tabulation 
of all patrons who made any inquiry 
concerning the Drew comedies and to 
forward such returns to the local Para- 
mount exchange. 

A tabulation is now being made of the 
returns from all first-run houses, and 
the surprising result is revealed that 
every first-run theatre returns a state- 
ment showing that at every performance 
inquiry was made at the box office by 
a substantial number of patrons with 
respect to, first — "How many reels is 
the Drew comedy?" and second — "Is it 
a new one?" 



Film Exports to All 

Parts of the World 

WASHINGTON, D. C— American mo- 
tion picture films are shown pretty near 
all over the world, according to the Gov- 
ernment's report from the Department of 
Commerce. During the month of Decem- 
ber, 1918, we exported exposed films to 
25 countries, a total of 7,564,658 feet, with 
a value of $590,818. Our field for unex- 
posed film, however, is more limited, ex- 
ports during December being made to but 
six countries and totaling 11,319,525 feet, 
with a value of $245,512. 

Our greatest market for unexposed film 
was France, which took nearly 90 per cent 
of the total shipments, while England and 
Australia took the largest amounts of ex- 
posed film. Mexico appears to be coming 
right along as a valuable market, our De- 
cember exports to that country being ten 
feet valued at one dollar. 



New Zealand Film 

Magnate in Country 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— E. J. Righ- 
ton, moving-picture magnate of New Zea- 
land, arrived here for the purpose of look- 
ing into studio conditions in this country. 
Righton owns forty-five theatres in New 
Zealand, about 85 per cent of the silent 
drama houses in that country. He con- 
ducts his own exchange and has practically 
a monopoly on the business there. 

According to Righton, there are few 
"legit" theatres on the islands, as there 
are few large cities, most of the towns 
running under 20,000 in population, so that 
motion pictures have a field virtually to 
themselves. 

Righton states that the American films 
are very popular with New Zealand au- 
diences, more than holding their own with 
the English pictures, the production of 
which have become negligible during the 
last year or two. 



Handle Mix Series 

Doll-Van published the first of the 
"Tom Mix" two-reel series in Indiana 
and Illinois March 1. 



"Charge It to Me" 

A New Fisher Film 

Feminine theatre patrons are going 
to find much to interest them in "Charge 
It to Me," a Margarita Fisher feature 
now in the making at the American Film 
Company studios at Santa Barbara, Cal., 
it is said. This comedy-drama deals with 
an economic phase of married life from 
an original angle, and besides afford- 
ing many laughs, will offer some real 
food for thought. It is a safe guess 
that the average woman who beholds 
the production will inveigle her husband 
into witnessing it also. L. V. Jefferson 
furnished the story and continuity and 
Roy W. Neill is directing its produc- 
tion. 



Perrin Resigns 

Dwight S. Perrin, for more than a year 
director of publicity for Goldwyn Pic- 
tures Corporation, has resigned, effect- 
ive March 1. He has not made known 
his plans except so far as they involve 
a vacation long deferred. 



Lasky Signs Castle 

Irene Castle, dancer and motion pic- 
ture star, has been engaged by the 
Famous Players-Lasky Corporation to 
appear on the screen in an adaptation 
of Robert W. Chambers' popular story, 
"The Firing Line." 



New Publicity Man 

Walter Brooks, former manager of 
Coatesville, Pa., Auditorium, has suc- 
ceeded Henry MacMahon in the position 
of publicist for the Educational Film 
Company. 



Vote On Sunday Shows 

FOSTORTA, O.— The citizens of Fos- 
toria probably will be given a chance to 
vote for or against Sunday motion pic- 
ture shows. 

46 



Senator Turns Laughs 
On Hoosier Reformers 
During Sunday Debate 

Senator Metzger, d uring the discussion 
on the Sunday theatre bill in Indiana, made 
a target of some of his brother senators 
who favored the blue laws. 

"Having blithely aided in making In- 
diana a parched and barren desert," said 
the senator, "I have viewed unmoved the 
distress of my fellow-citizens curing on 
the vine, but now I confess that the pro- 
posal to restrict the picture shows and 
abolish the Bevo filling stations occasion 
me some discomposure. 

"Which is more demoralizing to the 
public, Theda Bara in 'Cleopatra,' the 
plump rotundity of Fatty Arbuckle in a 
bathtub, or a glimpse of the south eleva- 
tion of Senator Wolfson in rompers and 
suede spats chasing a golf ball about the 
links on Sunday afternoon? Is the picture 
of Douglas Fairbanks kneeling before 
Pauline Frederick in a field of golden but- 
tercups and vowing to pay off the mort- 
gage on the old home when he is re- 
leased from prison any more scandalous 
than a group of legislators with sus- 
penders at half mast playing pinochle at 
the club? Is there anything more repre- 
hensible in the entire calendar of vice 
than the greatest of all indoor sports 
where a player draws one card to a 
straight open in the middle and bumps 
the opener with aces up?" 

Davenport Theatre Men 

Fight Sunday Closing 

DAVENPORT, IA.— Davenport the- 
atre men will lead the fight in this state 
against the threatened blue laws, which 
if passed will close theatres on Sundav 
throughout the state of Iowa. 

The managers voted to tax themselves 
two cents a seat for a fund to fight the 
passage of any bill favoring the closing 
of the theatres on Sunday. It is declared 
such a law would put most of the small 
theatres out of business. 




CTIN^DLTINWTILM NEWS 



Building Campaign 
Gains Momentum 
Throughout Canada 

New $200,000 Theatre for 
Toronto — Williams and 
Morley to Build 

Messrs. Jule and J. J. Allen of Toronto, 
had barely finished their beautiful Bloor 
Street theatre in Toronto when they 
announced that another large theatre 
would be erected by them on St. Clair 
avenue, near Dufferin street, Toronto, 
to cost $200,000 and to seat 2,000 people. 
This house will have a frontage of 135 
feet on St. Clair ave. Unlike several 
houses which the Aliens have recently 
opened, the new theatre will have a 
bancony and which will hold 500 persons. 

The Aliens will carry out a big build- 
ing campaign throughout Canada during 
the year. Before next January more 
than fifteen new theatres will be under 
construction in Canada under their di- 
rection. The statement is made that 
each of these new theatres will cost from 
$125,000 to $300,000 each. 

The Aliens are not alone in the theatre 
building boom in Canada, however. The 
Paramount Theatres Limited, which is 
a subsidiary of Regal Films, Limited, is 
fast extending its chain of theatres in 
Eastern Canada. Alexander Pantages, 
the Western theatre man, is extending 
the scope of his operations to Eastern 
Canada. Announcement is made of the 
reorganization of Griffin theatre interests 
in Canada under the name of Griffin 
Enterprises, Limited, for the purpose of 
acquiring further houses and of con- 
structing several lew theatres. 

Harvey Williams and Rex W. Morley, 
two Toronto exhibitors, have arranged 
to build an 1,800 seat theatre in the 
Beach District of Toronto. This house, 
which will be started on April 1, will 
take in the Peter Pan Theatre at Queen 
street East and Waverly road but the 
new structure will be easily three times 
the size of the old house. R. Kershaw 
has rebuilt and reopened the Osborne 
theatre in Winnipeg and the Loew the- 
atre enterprises have started to build 
new theatres at London and Ottawa. 
The Monarch and Avenue theatres at 
Winnipeg are to be reconstructed and 
improved and many other theatres 
throughout the Dominion are to be re- 
built, replaced or changed. 



Manager Laurie Uses 

Clever Advertising 

Manager Archie Laurie of the Strand 
Theatre, Ottawa, Ontario, used clever 
advertising copy in the Ottawa Journal 
to announce the presentation of the first 
episode of "The Master Mystery." the 
serial in which Houdini is starred. 

The first big line in the advertisement 
was "The Day" and this was followed 
by the statement that "In the History of 
Motion Pictures the Day of Days has 
Come — Motion Picture Fans who see 
the Houdini Serial will have their day. 



The Day of Days is Monday, March 
10. The Serial is entitled "The Master 
Mystery." etc. 

The name Houdini was printed in large 
type on a line by itself whenever it was 
used throughout the large advertisement. 
The arrangement was not confusing and 
the text was attractive. 



Regal Gets Weekly 

Following closely the announcement 
that Regal Films, Limited, of Toronto, 
would distribute Select Pictures through- 
out Canada conies the announcement 
that the Regal company will handle the 
Ford Educational monthly throughout 
the Dominion. This arrangement started 
on March 1. It has been stated that the 
Ford Motor Company of Canada, Lim- 
ited, had arranged for the services of 
cameramen in various parts of the 
Dominion to take scenic and topical 
views for the Canadian edition of the 
Ford Educational. The picture will be 
handled through all six offices of the 
company and a nominal fee of only $1 
per booking is made. 



Specialty Makes Record 

The Specialty Film Import, Limited, 
Canadian Pathe Distributors, Montreal, 
created a record in the matter of prints 
of a picture for Canadian usage when 
twenty-two prints of the 1,000 foot reel 
showing the burial of the late Sir Wil- 
frid Laurier, the great Canadian states- 
man, were made and rushed to a dozen 
different cities of the country within a 
few hours after the funeral was held. 
This number of prints was exceeded on 
only one other occasion in Canada when 
thirty-three prints of the Victory Loan 
pictures were made for Canadian con- 
sumption. That was for a patriotic pur- 
pose, however. 




ADROIT HANDLING OF 
PATRONS COMPLAINTS 
DRAWS LARGE CROWDS 

Will M. Elliott, manager of the Regent 
Theatre Toronto's magnificent do,wn- 
town film house, apparently has the cour- 
age of his convictions. After receiving 
a rather scorching letter from a patron 
regarding the newspaper advertisement 
for "The Common Cause" in which ex- 
ception was taken to the statement that 
it was a picture that would appeal to 
Canadians, Manager Elliott exhibited the 
letter in the lobby of the Regent along 
with several local reviews of the pic- 
ture. . .'. 

One statement in. the letter was as fol- 
lows:— "This is not the kind of adver- 
tisement that appeals to decent intelli- 
gent people." Mr. Elliott therefore put 
the heading "What Intelligent People 
Say" over the reviews in two of the 
local newspapers while "What Some 
Silly Ass Says" was the heading over 
the complaint. 

The Regent played to capacity busi- 
ness all during the week when "The 
Common Cause" was ,the attraction and 
the theatre also was filled to the limit 
three times daily during the week of the 
presentation of "Virtuous Wives." Dur- 
ing the first week in March ..the' big 
attraction was Bert Lytell, the Toronto 
actor, in "The Spender." 



Plaster Causes Scare 

Nearly a i panic was caused at the 
Dominion Theatre, Ottawa, Ontario, on 
Saturday, March 1, when the falling of a 
small piece of plaster caused an excit- 
able person to raise the cry of "fire". 
There was an immediate rush to the 
exits and an alarm was turned in to 
fire headquarters. The theatre was 
crowded with man}' children and they 
began a sudden rush to the exits until 
halted by attendants and guardians. Not 
the slightest trace of fire was found by 
the firemen. Several patrons sustained 
minor bruises during the confusion. 



When Manager Lavoie of the National 
Theatre, Ottawa, Ontario, secured a 
second run of "The Common Cause" 
the war picture made under the auspices 
of the British-Canadian Recruiting Mis- 
sion in the U. S., immediately after the 
feature had had its first local run at 
the Imperial Theatre, arrangements were 
made for a special presentation of the 
feature at the National Theatre on Sun- 
day, March !). for the benefit of returned 
soldiers. The latter were admitted with- 
out charge for the performance. 



Drnmntlc moment from the thirteenth 
episode of the FrnnclH Ford aerial, 
"The Silent Mystery" 



Midland Theatre Burns 

The motion picture theatre at Mid- 
land, Ontario, was totally destroyed by 
fire on Saturday, March 1, from an un- 
known cause. The theatre had recently 
been remodeled. It was operated by 
A. Bugg. A portion of the building 
was occupied by a drug store which was 
also destroyed by the flames. The loss 
is estimated at $25, 000. 



47 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Unique Ad. Pays 

The newspaper advertisements for the 
New Grand Theatre, Montreal, on Mon- 
day, March 3, were unusual in that they 
were linked up with a current happening. 
It was the first day of the run of "Kid- 
dies in the Ruins," the English special, 
and the newspaper ads, announced "Two 
big events in Montreal today— One is 
General Paul Pau and the other is " 'Kid- 
dies in the Ruins.' " Another feature 
in "Sis Hopkins." 

Manager George Rotsky of the New 
Grand Theatre was recently married. 



Theatre Closes Sundays 

Although it enjoyed the privilege of 
operating on Sundays along with all 
other theatres of Montreal and suburbs, 
the Allen Theatre of Westmount, which 
is virtually a part of Montreal, is now 
closed on the Sabbath. This step was 
taken voluntarily, it was announced, out 
of respect to the wishes of a number 
of patrons. The New Grand Theatre, in 
Montreal proper, which is operated by 
the Allen interests, is operating as usual 
on Sundays. 



Appeal Tax Assessment 

The Regent Theatre, Toronto, has ap- 
pealed to the Ontario Railway and 
Municipal Board for a reduction of the 
assessment for the City of Toronto which 
was fixed by Judge Winchester. Origin- 
ally the assessment on this property 
stood at $104,000 on the land and $80,000 
on the building. The judge reduced the 
land assessment to $98,800 and the build- 
ing assessment to $75,000 but the ap- 
pellants still contend that the tax valua- 
tions are too high. Judgment was re- 
served by the Board. 



Loew Theatre at London 

Lawrence Solman of Toronto, repre- 
senting Canadian Loew theatre interests 
and owner of the Royal Alexandra Thea- 
tre, Toronto, has officially announced 
that a Loew Theatre will be erected 
immediately at London, Ontario. The 
house is to seat 2,500 people, it is de- 
clared. The London house will split 
weeks with the new Loew Theatre at 
Hamilton, Ontario. The site is at Dun- 
das and Wellington Streets, London. 

Colleton With Regal 

J. J. Colleton, formerly manager of the 
Toronto office of the Specialty Film Im- 
port, Ltd., Canadian Pathe distributors, 
has become manager of the St. John 
office of Regal Films, Ltd., Toronto. 



Exhibitor Town Officer 

Manager Al Cooper of the Lyceum 
Theatre, Huntsville, Ontario, now holds 
the distinction of being a member of the 
local town council, having recently been 
elected to office. 



Building operations on the new Loew 
Theatre in Ottawa, the Canadian Capital, 
are to be rushed, it is announced so that 
the new house will be ready for use 
early next fall. 



CANADIAN BRIEFS 

1 i 

I - „,J 

A. J. Small has taken over Turner's 
Opera House at Peterboro, Ontario, and 
the house will be continued as a moving 
picture theatre. 

Alexander Pantages, head of the chain 
of Pantages Theatres in Western Can- 
ada, has organized the Pantages Motion 
Picture Company, according to an an- 
nouncement. Pantages is also extending 
the scope of his theatre operations to 
Eastern Canada, it has also been offic- 
ially stated, by the erection of new the- 
atres in Toronto, Montreal and probably 
other centers. That he proposes to 
operate a film exchange of his own is 
now intimated through the latest an- 
nouncement. 

Wednesdays and Thursdays are now 
"bargain days" at the new Garden The- 
atre, College and Spadina Ave., Toronto. 
These were the weak days of the week 
with the result that the current program 
has been increased to the extent of an 
additional five-reel feature. On March 
5 and 6, the bill included Bushman and 
Bayne in "A Pair of Cupids" and Roy 
Stewart in "The Devil Dodger," and a 
comedy. 

The Ottawa Valley Amusement Com- 
pany will erect a new theatre at Almonte, 
Ontario, it has been announced. The 
company has been presenting its pic- 
ture performances in a public hall at 
Almonte for several years but it is now 
the intention to erect a theatre build- 
ing. 



Labor Question Up 

AUGUSTA, GA.— Prospects of an 
amicable settlement between theatre 
owners and operators are bright. 




ELLIOTT DEXTER 
Who appear* In Cecil B. DeAIille's new 
Artcraft picture, "For Better, 
For Worse." 

4* 



Selznick Exploiting 

"Upstairs and Down" 

Selznick Pictures Corporation has 
launched a campaign of national adver- 
tising for its star Olive Thomas, with 
special reference to the first production, 
"Upstairs and Down," which has just 
been completed under the direction of 
Charles Giblyn at the Pacific Coast 
studios. 

This campaign was begun several 
weeks ago, when two electric signs were 
installed at Times Square announcing 
the forthcoming production. Another 
and still larger installation of the same 
sort is being erected on the Godfrey 
building, and will be one of the largest 
theatrical signs in the world. Still an- 
other contract has just been closed for a 
sign in Buffalo facing Lafayette Square, 
and this will be illuminated within a 
week. Negotiations are under way for 
still more of these advertising displays 
in other cities. 

The second phase of the national ad- 
vertising campaign is being conducted 
throught the fan magazines. Advertise- 
ments in photoplay and motion picture 
magazines will appear shortly. 

William Desmond Back 

In Western Film Again 

In his newest Jesse D. Hampton pro- 
duction, "The Prodigal Liar," which will 
be published by the Exhibitors' Mutual, 
William Desmond's returns to the west- 
ern country, a locale in which his most 
popular screen work has been accom- 
plished, while the conventional garb of 
civilization as commonly regarded in 
centers of population has been elimi- 
nated in favor of the fuzzy "chaps" of 
the cowboy and the sombrero. 

Hawaii Theatre Burns 

SPRECKELSVILLE, MAUI, HA- 
WAII — The motion picture theatre at 
Camp 1 was destroyed by a fire, believed 
to have been caused by a lighted cigar 
being dropped in the waste basket. The 
building was formerly a warehouse of 
the Hawaiian Commercial Sugar com- 
pany. 

To Remodel Theatre 

GLOVERSVILLE, N. Y.— J. Myer 
Schine, manager of the Hippodrome for 
the past two years, has purchased the 
building in which his theatre is located 
and will remodel the structure so as to 
materially increase its seating capacity. 

Few Films Objected To 

PORTLAND, ORE.— Only fourteen 
eliminations were made by the local cen- 
sorship board during the past month, in 
viewing 515 reels, which included 167 
subjects. 

To Build at Oshkosh 

OSHKOSH, WIS.— Mandel Rice, well 
known Milwaukee theatre man, is plan- 
ning to erect a 2,000 seat motion picture 
theatre here at a cost of $60,000. 



Hoyburn Theatre, Evanston, Starts 
Unique Travel Club for Children 

With Aid of Burton Holmes Films Will Teach 
Geography — Prizes Offered for 
Best Answers 



A movement that promises to become 
nation-wide in its scope was launched 
this week in Evanston, 111., at the Hoy- 
burn theatre, of which Samuel Atkin- 
son is director. It is to be known as 
the Travel Club for Children. 

The purpose of the Club is to teach 
by means of Burton Holmes travel 
films, geography and history, two 
studies often found difficult for pupils 
to master. 

To stimulate interest in the travel 
club, Burton Holmes, of the Famous 
Players-Lasky corporation, is offering 
sixteen prizes to the school children of 
Evanston. 

Prizes for Children 

These prizes will be awarded to the 
pupils who fill out and return to the 
Hoyburn theatre, the best set of an- 
swers to ten questions on each picture 
shown. 

The first Burton Holmes travel pic- 
ture will be "Glorious Versailles" and 
the questions embrace various features 
to be found in the travel film, such as 
"For whom was the palace of Ver- 
sailles built?" "What did it cost," etc. 
These points will be embodied in the 
film. 

The prizes are unique. The first prize 
in each class, of which there are three. 
A B and C, consists of a motion picture 
portrait of the winning child showing 
him in school, at play and at home. 
Class A includes children between the 
ages of 10 and 12; Class B, from 12 to 
14 years, and Class C from 14 to 16 
years of age. Friday, April 4, has been 
chosen as the date for showing the 
picture of the winning child at the Hoy- 
burn theatre. 

Second Prize Awards 

The second prize will be 52 tickets, 
admitting bearer to 52 Friday perform- 
ances at the Hoyburn, on which days 
Burton Holmes Little Journeys will be 
shown. These prizes will be given with 
the compliments of Samuel Atkinson, 
manager of the Hoyburn theatre. There 
will be three second prizes. 

The third prizes (of which there will 
be ten in each class) will consist of a 
photogravure of Burton Holmes, auto- 
graphed by Mr. Holmes. 

Blanks upon which the questions are 
printed and space for the children's an- 
swers are being distributed by the 
various schools. Burton Holmes will 
personally address the children upon 



the opening night of the Travel Club 
Picture, March 21. Replies must be 
filed on or before March 26. 

If the movement proves successful in 
Evanston the Famous Players-Lasky 
corporation intends to inaugurate the 
same scheme throughout the country. 



Doll- Van Will Assist 

Exhibitors to Adverties 

The Doll-Van Film Corporation is 
one of the few state right companies 
which maintain a department of adver- 
tising men who devise advertising aids 
for the exhibitors on their various pic- 
tures. 

Whenever the Doll-Van Film Corpo- 
ration closes a contract for a picture, 
these men immediately start working on 
a complete advertising service for the 
exhibitor. 

Art advertisements are conceived and 
electrotypes are then made. Plain cuts 
for use in connection with readers are 
devised, and a variety of original press 
stories are written. After all of the dif- 
ferent styles of advertising are gotten 
out a publicity bulletin is published 
which contains the whole campaign and 
gives clear instructions for the use of 
all the matter contained therein. 



Rice Succeeds Mack 

Universal Exchange 

Tarkington Baker, general publicity 
director of the Universal Film Mfg. 
Company, has appointed Harry Rice 
publicity manager of the Universal ex- 
change, Chicago, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Irving 
Mack on March 8. 

Mr. Rice has had experience along 
this line, having promoted publicity 
campaigns for several films. He han- 
dled the advertising and publicity work 
for the successful feature "Should She 
Obey?" He was also a member of the 
Chicago American staff, from which po- 
sition he goes to Universal. 



Drews Complete Comedy 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew completed 
"Squared," the Paramount-Drew comedy 
on which they were working in Chicago 
before ending their engagement at the 
Woods Theatre and starting on a long 
road tour. 



Motion Picture Is 
Guide to Children, 
Declares Professor 

Speaker Before Commission 
Says Theatres Have 
Big Influence 

That motion pictures have a more im- 
portant influence on the growing child 
than the church is the opinion of Prof. 
Ernest W. Burgess, teacher of sociology 
at the University of Chicago, who re- 
ported to the Chicago council censorship 
commission the results of observations 
made by 237 teachers of the fourth, sixth, 
eighth and some high school grades of 
the effect motion pictures have on chil- 
dren. 

He said of the 100,000 children tested 
over 50 per cent were vitally affected by 
the . motion picture. 

"Parents of today are confronted with 
a different child welfare problem than 
that faced by our forefathers," said Pro- 
fessor Burgess. "The average child is 
more influenced by the motion picture 
than by the church, and it is the parents' 
duty to see that children are kept from 
seeing harmful pictures." 

Dr. Fred Z. Zapffee, reputed neurolo- 
gist, advised that children be permitted 
to go to theatres only once a week and 
that the show be not longer than one 
hour and a half. He said modern pic- 
tures cause children to become irritable, 
nervous, excitable and that of the 500,- 
000 who visit the theatres weekly over 
40 per cent visit the theatres at least 
three times a week. 

Chairman Timothy D. Hurley and the 
other members of the commission ex- 
pressed surprise at the statistics. 



Exhibitors' Supply Has 

Enlarged Quarters Again 

Compelled by constantly increasing 
business to seek larger quarters, the Ex- 
hibitors' Supply Company has leased the 
entire second floor of the Famous Play- 
ers-Lasky building, 845 South Wabash 
avenue, covering 4,000 square feet, and 
will have their general office and sales 
office there. The Chicago sales office, 
however, will continue to be located at 
407-8 Mailers building. 

Organized four years ago, the com- 
pany has had a remarkable growth due 
to the enterprise of Messrs. Dutton, 
Douglas and Lincoln. It was started in 
the Peoples' Gas building with only 300 
square feet of floor space in July, 1915. 
took 600 square feet in the Mailers 
building the following May, and then 
doubled its space in the Mailers build- 
ing in January, 1917. 



The Same Policy In New Form-Independent And Dependable Reviews 



49 



470900 A 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



^HfliumniiiiiiiiiinniiHiHiiuiiiiiiwiiiiiiiuiw immi i iittnimifliniiiiiiiHUiinti iiiiiviiiRitniijiHiiiiiiian iiiiiiiintMiHtiiniiiii nw>^ 

[ CHICAGO NOTES • 

By J. S. MacH 

^iniiuiiniiiHiiiiimuii^ giiiuiiiuiuiii nun niiiiiiiuiiii iii!iiii:;iiiii!iniiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiijt 



Lee Goldberg, manager Louisville 
First National office, was a recent 
visitor to the local office. 



H. Holah, manager of the Omaha 
First National office, spent a wee visit 
here, telling Chi how they get 'em out 
there. Oh yes, he is a member of the 
famous Holah film family. 



Meyer Silverman just arrived in the 
city to arrange affairs on behalf of the 
"Fit to Win" film, endorsed by the 
Provost Marshal General of the U. S. A. 
Back in Pittsburgh Meyer tells us it's 
going like a forest fire. 



Even that "cute" little film palace, the 
Little World Theater, on West Ran- 
dolph street, is getting in the week-run 
class. Been playing Nazimova in "Out 
of the Fog" week of March 5. Still we 
hear you can't do it. 



W. Van Gelder has resigned from the 
Pathe sales department. Van has surely 
been an old timer by right of residence 
with this wide awake exchange. 



Lee Herz, of the Silee Film Exchange, 
is all lit up with "The Profiteer" smiles 
and the next breath he slips us the info 
he has just closed for two more big 
ones. Have a heart, Lee. Leave a little 
for the rest of us. 



John Jones is a recent addition to the 
Central Film Company's sales force. 
Best wishes, Jack. 



Al Rosenthal was discovered, accom- 
panied by "Rabbi" Paul Smith hopping 
a flyer for Indianapolis. What's up Al? 
Aw come on, let us all listen. 



"Yes, everything is fine," breezes Ed 
Mordue of Pathe. Fren wife refuses to 
stay ill any longer. Glad to hear it, Ed. 
That Thompson "chow" must have been 
terrible going. 



It's the dearest little thing imaginable 
and Cress Smith gets all fussed if you 
stare at it too long. Yep, only ten days 
old. We mean that hirsute dash below 
the nostrils. 



Walt Spoor, of the Academy theater 
of Waukegan, reports a record run for 
"Hearts of the World." week of Feb. 24. 



Carl Mueller, of Rock Island, 111.; 
Pete Sarantas, of the Family theater, 
Elkhart, Ind.: Mearle Eastburn, of the 
Star theater, Watseka, 111.; and Charles 
Pahler, of the Abingdon theater, Abing- 
don 111., were visitors to the local First 
Nalional office. 

Pete Schaefer surely looked like 
optimism itself the other day seated at 
the big round table in the Winter Gar- 
den. That lawn tennis, as played in 
Florida, must be a wonder worker 
Come on P. J., most of it was "porch 
golf." Are we right?" 



H. H. Friedman, of Keokuk, Iowa, is 
busy digging up the dirt for a new the- 
ater to go up in Springfield, 111. 



Our carrier pigeon unit reports the 
erection of a new theater for Edwards- 
ville, 111., to be known as the Rialto. 



At last the Warrington theater of 
Oak Park breathes again under the ban- 
ner of filmdom. We understand H. H. 
Goldson is the directing genius. 



Apropos a real SERVICE HINT to all 
local exchange managers. In case any 
of the boys showing signs of ennui, slip 
'em a dime and chase them to that won- 
der show place of the Hammonds, the 
Vendome theater, way out south on 
State street. They must hear that 
"Phoenix breakdown" originated by an 
orchestra that is second to none. It will 
CURE anything. 



Aaron J. Jones leaves for Los Angeles 
March 17 for a two-weeks' stay. Please 
hurry back A. J. Every absentee is a 
vote for prohibition. 



S. Uffenheimer and S. Katzenbach, of 
the American theater of Terre Haute, 
Ind., beat the Hoosier state out of 
March 5 by looking old Chi over. Come 
again boys, always glad to have a chat 
with our neighbors. 



G. W. Puttinger reports the sale of 
his Grand theater at Centralia, Illinois, 
to Griffin & Hall. 



George Karras has now completed the 
erection of his new theater at Effing- 
ham, Illinois, to be known as the Or- 
pheum. 



A. Zelikow of the Broadway theater 
at Waukegan, 111., has been stricken 
with the "flu" and is seriously ill. 



Harry Weiss leaves March 10 for a 
two weeks' romp in the South. 'Tis 
said, he recently purchased (or bor- 
rowed) an armful of auto guides, so it 
seems like he might be on an automo- 
bile jaunt. 



Some one told us the "boys" were 
about to delve into the mysteries of 
polite pugilism. Big "Vita" Salter and 
"Schrapnel" Mordue ought to make a 
good starter. Will their respective man- 
agers please get in touch with Smiley 
Corbett or Ed Smith and have this 
properly arranged. 

Among the film notables that were 
seen around the Universal Film Ex- 
change during the past week were Jerry 
Abrams, of New York: J. F. Frisch, of 
Des Moines; Curly Culvert, of Omaha: 
James Bryson, manager of Universal 
exchange, Minneapolis; and Henry Ber- 
man, general sales manager of Uni- 
versale New York office. 

A. L. Silverman, the well known pur- 
veyor of celluloid, drops us a note from 



Madison, Wis., in which he says he is 
breaking all records for the Bee Hive 
film concern, whom he is now repre- 
senting in Wisconsin. 



At a meeting of the rehabilitated 
F-I-L-M Club held at the City Club last 
Friday night the following officers were 
elected: Clyde W. Eckhart, president; 
Fred C. Aiken, vice-president; Frank B. 
Rogers, treasurer; Cress E. Smith, sec- 
retary. Several matters of local im- 
portance were discussed, among them 
being city Ordinance requiring the re- 
moval of all exchanges from the "loop." 
This order takes effect in May, 1920, 
and already plans are being made by the 
big film companies to comply. 



George Levine, for the past two years 
and a half a member of the Universal 
Film Exchange sales force, has resigned. 
Mr. Levine has become a salesman for 
the Celebrated Players Film Corpora- 
tion. George is regarded as one of the 
best short subject film salesmen in the 
city and there is no doubt that he will 
make good with Celebrated. 



Among the screen notables in our 
midst last week were Mae Marsh, with 
her husband, Louis Lee Armes, and 
Madge Kennedy, with hers, Harold Bol- 
ster, who is now a Wall street broker, 
having deserted the film game a couple 
of months ago. The Armes stopped out 
on Buena avenue with Mr. Armes' sis- 
ter, while the Bolsters spent the week 
taking in the various stage attractions. 



Backed Into Theatres 

Charles Sevrinski, 9 years old, who for 
weeks has been annoying Chicago thea- 
tre owners by mingling with the crowd 
leaving picture shows and walking in 
backwards, was picked up by the police 
and sent to the parental scheol. 



While in Kansas City Make Your 
Home at the 

Westgate Hotel 

200 Rooms 200 Baths 
Rates $1.50 and Up— "Mostly $1.50" 




Absolutely Fireproof 

Westgate Hotel 

At the Junction 
On Main and Delaware at Ninth 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



50 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Capture Thief After 

Downtown Theatre Is 
Robbed at Cleveland 

CLEVELAND, OHIO— One man was 
shot and fatally wounded when two 
armed thugs held up the Strand theatre 
in Cleveland and robbed the cashier of 
the receipts — $99.23. After an exciting 
chase through the downtown streets one 
robber was captured. 

The robbery occurred March 1 at the 
supper hour. The Strand is located at 
East Ninth and Prospect avenues in the 
downtown section and the streets were 
black with people. Several who saw the 
robbery pursued the crooks, who fired 
at the pursuers, hitting Charles Meyers 
in the abdomen. 

The chase extended five blocks until 
one of the robbers, James Marco, 19, ran 
into an apartment house and took refuge 
in a room. Policeman Herman Berhendt 
followed and captured him. 

Cleveland has for several months been 
experiencing a wave of crime, btit this 
was the first time a large theatre had 
been robbed. Previously the American 
and National theatres, small houses, 
were broken into at night. Managers 
were taking unusual precautions when 
the ticket booths contained large amounts 
of money, but they had no idea that a 
robbery would be attempted at the sup- 
per hour. 

* * * 

Claude Marcus, son of Max Marcus, 
owner of the U. S. Theatre. Cleveland, 
died at Camo Taylor, Ky., of pneumonia 
last week. Before joining the army he 
was engaged with his father in the man- 
agement of the theatre. He had a host 
of friends who were shocked to hear of 
his death. 

* * * 

The Sundav opening law. sponsored 
by the Ohio State Screen League, which 
is planned to legalize Sunday motion pic- 
ture performances, is making good prog- 
ress since it was introduced in the Ohio 
House of Representatives. 

The bill was referred to the cities com- 
mittee, which body will make a report 
which will decide whether it will be 
voted on or not by March 15. 

The committee held hearings on the 
bill the week of March 2. at which Fred 
Desberg and Henry Lustig, Cleveland 
attorneys and theatre owners, argued its 
merits. 

* * * 

Winslow Pope of the Plaza theatre, 
Sanduskv. Ohio, has severed his connec- 
tions with the Schade theatre interests 
there and is now connected with the Star 
theatre as its publicity man. 

Mr. Pope has been manager of the 
Plaza for nearly two years and had 
charge of the Lyceum since last Septem- 
ber. 

Associates of Mr. Pone nlan to build 
a large new theatre in Sandusky soon. 

* * * 

Ed Cohn, Cleveland film man, has pur- 
chased the Lincoln theatre on the west 
side. Ed savs everybody is giviner bim 
the laugh, but he will show them iust 
like he did with two or three o'ther 
houses he bought. Frank Greenwald. his 
partner, also in the business of setting 
juice out of lemons, savs he is looking 
for another like the Troy, which he 
bought a month ago. 




Houdini makes another escape. An epi- 
sode from "The Master Mystery" serial 
produced for Octagon Films, Inc. 



Des Moines Letter 



DES MOINES, IOWA— Ottumwa is 
to have a new picture house to be opened 
May 1, owned by Morris Lince. The 
building is being remodeled at a cost of 
$40,000 and will have a seating capacity 
of 700. It is planned to have a symphony 
orchestra. 

Morris Lince has sold the Princess 
theatre at Ottumwa to D. Baker, for- 
merly owner of the Rex, who will re- 
model the building and put it in first class 
condition. 

District Manager S. J. Goldman of 
Universal spent the week in Des Moines 
boosting the new serial, "The Red 
Glove." 

Jack Cohen, formerly road man for 
Pathe in Iowa, who has completed his 
service in the army, is covering the 
northern part of the state for Universal. 

Manager Day of the Palace advertised 
"The Eleventh Commandment" by sus- 
pending over the sidewalk a painting of 
a lar'ge bible with these words across 
the page, "Ladies, do you know what is 
the eleventh commandment?" 

Paul H. Tessier is the new manager 
of the Pathe exchange at Des Moines. 
He was formerly assistant manager for 
Pathe at Cleveland. 

L. A. Sheridan, formerly manager of 
Pathe at Des Moines, has accepted the 
management of a rug cleaning compound 
company. 

M. J. Frish, manager of the Universal 
office here, has returned from a sales 
meeting at Chicago. 



Texas Exhibitor Moves 

C. G. Frame has disposed of the Pas- 
time Theatre at Miami, Texas, and pur- 
chased a new house at Claude, Texas. 



Sydney Garret Gets 

"Virtuous Men" Film 
For Foreign Countries 

An extensive advertising and exploita- 
tion campaign has been inaugurated by 
Sidney Garrett, president of J. Frank 
Brockliss, Inc., in the interests of "Vir- 
tuous Men," the initial Ralph Ince film 
attraction. 

Mr. Garrett holds the exclusive 
rights to distribute the E. K. Lincoln 
feature sponsoied by Messrs. Sawyer and 
Lubin in the foreign film markets. A 
private showing of "Virtuous Men" in 
semi-finished form was given for the 
benefit of Garrett recently, at which time 
he enthusiastically endorsed the produc- 
tion, it is said. 

Impressed with the out-of-the-ordi- 
nary qualities of the first S-L offering, 
Garrett immediately outlined an adver- 
tising campaign, which he will execute 
in behalf of the picture in all countries 
exclusive of the United States and 
Canada. This advertising will be closely 
co-ordinated with the material which 
has been used to exploit "Virtuous Men" 
by the producers. A series of beautiful 
color inserts, the work of famous ar- 
tists, published in the Exhibitors' Herald 
will be distributed abroad, in addition to 
a specially prepared series of publicity 
stories suited for foreign consumption. 

• 

"Once to Every Man" 

Is in Great Demand 

The Frohman Amusement Company 
report the closing of several contracts 
on their special "Once to Every Man." 
The following contracts were signed 
within the past week, Greater New 
York, Long Isiand and Westchester 
County to Merritt Film Exchange of 
New York city; New England states to 
the Major Films, Inc., of Boston; Michi- 
igan, to Arthur S. Hyman Attractions of 
Detroit; Northern New York and North- 
ern New Jersey, to Nathan Hirsch of 
New York city; Delaware, Maryland and 
District of Columbia, Virginia and North 
Carolina to the Super-Film Attractions 
of Washington. D. C. ; South Carolina, 
Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Tennes- 
see to W. E. Drummond of Knoxville. 



Produce White Stories 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— The Great 
Authors Pictures, Inc., has leased a part 
of the Robert Brunton studios and will 
produce several stories by Maj. Stewart 
Edward White, who recently returned 
from France. 



New Theatre for Sharon 

SHARON, PA.— Options have been 
secured by local business men on a large 
piece of property here, upon which will 
be erected a 2,000 seat playhouse at a 
cost of $150,000. 



Cutting "Marrying Mary" 

Marion Davies having finished "Mar- 
rying Mary." which Director Alan Dwan 
is now cutting, will rest next week prior 
to beginning work at the Backer-Bacon 
studios on a new production. 



51 



jendarofprogrampublicatiq; 



AMERICAN FILM COMPANY 

{Available at Pathe Exchanges.) 

"Eves of Julia Deep," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Money Isn't Everything," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Hobbs in a Hurry," five reels, with William Russell. 
"Mantle of Charity," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Rosemary Climbs the Heights, five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"All the World to Nothing," five reels, with William Russell. 
"Wives and Other Wives," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Fair Enough," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"When a Man Rides Alone," five reels, with William Russell. 
"The Amazing Imposter," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Molly of the Follies," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Where the West Begins," five reels, with William Russell. 

EXHIBITORS' MUTUAL DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

Nov. 17 — "The Daredevil." five reels, with Gail Kane. 

Dec. — Martin Johnson s "Cannibals of the South Seas," fire reels. 

Dec. — Affiliated, "The Girl of My Dreams," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 

Dec. — "And a Still Small Voice " five reels, with Henry B. Walthall. 

Jan. — "All of a Sudden Norma, five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 

Jan. — "Life's a Funny Proposition," five reels, with Wm. Desmond. 

Jan. — "Bonds of Honor," five reels, with Sessue Hayakawa. 

Jan. — "Hoop-La," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 

Jan. — "The Eleventh Commandment," five reels, with Lucille Lee Stewart 

Feb. — "Trick of Fate," five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 

Feb. — "Long Lane's Turning," five reels, with Henry B. WalthalL 

Feb. — "The Prodigal Liar," five reels, with William Desmond. 

Feb. — "What Every Woman Wants," five reels, with All Star Cast. 

Feb. — Martin Johnson's "Cannibals of South Seas," final installment, five 
reels. 

Mar. — "A Heart in Pawn," five reels, with Sessue Hayakawa. 

Mar. — "The Lamb and the Lion," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 

STRAND COMEDIES 

1 — "Keep Smiling," one reel. 

8 — "The Girl in the Box," one reel. 
16 — "The Tale of a Hat," one reel. 
'80 — "Are Brunettes False"? one reel. 

18 — "Just Home Made," one reel. 

4 — "Dan Cupid, M. D„" one reel. 
23 — "Beans for Two," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
89 — "They Did and They Didn't," two reels, with Elinor Field. 

6— "Accidental Heroes," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
12 — 'Some Mother." two reels, with Elinor Field. 
26 — "Easy Payments," one reel. 

2 — "How to Be Happy Though Married," one reel, with Elinor Field. 

9 — "Merely Marrying Mary," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
16 — "Almost a Hero," one reel, with Elinor Feild. 
23 — "Their Baby," one reel, with Elinor Field. _ 

2 — "The Wigwam System," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
9 — "The Door Between," one reel. 

16 — "His Wife's Birthday," one reel. 
23 — "The Way of a Maid," one reel. 

OCT-DOOR SUBJECTS 

6 — "A Tropic Melting Pot," one reel. 
'Black Feet and Flat Heads," one reel. 
'Bad Men and Good Scenery," one reel. 
'Peaks, Parks and Pines," one reel. 
'A Maori Romance," one reel. 
'Vacation Land," one reel. 
"High and Hungry," one reel. 
"Teetotalers, Tea and Totum Poles," one reel. 
"Geesers and Geysers," one reel. 
'Bulls and Bears." 
"Western Stuff." 
'Doing the Dells." 
'A Bit of God's Country." 
"Out Wyoming Way." 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

ARTCRAFT PICTURES 

5— "The Border Wireless," five reels, with Wm. S. Hart. 

17 — "My Cousin," five reels, with Enrico Caruso. 
1 — "Under the Greenwood Tree," five reels with Elsie Ferguson. 

1 — "Arizona," five reels, with Douglas Fairbanks. 

8 — "Greatest Thing in Life," Griffith Special. 

15— "Squaw Man," six reels, all star cast. 

16 — "Branding Broadway." five reels, with William S. Hart 

6— "Out of the Shadow,' 1 five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 
12 — "Under the Top," five reels, with Fred Stone. 

19 — "His Parisian Wife," five reels, with Elsie Ferguson. 
19 — "Here Comes the Bride," five reels, with John Barrymore. 
26 — "The Romance of Happy Valley," Griffith Special. 
26 — "Don't Change Your Husband, DeMille. 

2 — "Breed of Men," five reels, with William S. Hart. 
2 — "Alias Mike Moran," five reels, with Wallace Reid. 

9 — "Johnny Get Your Gun," five reels, with Fred Stone. 
9 — "The Marriage Price," five reels, with Elsie Ferguson. 

16 — "The Poppy Girl's Husband," five reels, with W. S. Hart. 
26— "The Girl Who Stayed at Home," five reels. (D. W. Griffith.) 

PARAMOUNT 

6— "The Man from Funeral Range," five reels, with Wallace Reid 

18 — "Such a Little Pirate," five reels, with Lila Lee. 
18 — "When Do We Eat?'' five reels, with Enid Bennett. 

17 — "The Gypsy Trail," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 
IT — "The Make-Believe Wife," five reels, with Billie Burke. 
84 — "Woman's Weapons," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 
84 — "A Daughter of Old South." five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 
84 — "Mlrandy Smiles," five reel*, with Vivian Martin. 

1 — "Fuss and Feathers," five reels, with Enid Bennett 



Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. . 

Oct.' 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dee. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 



Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec 

Dec 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 



Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec 
Dec 
an. 



an. 

eb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



17— 
84— 

1— 
8— 

16—' 
29— 
6—' 
12— 

19—' 
26— 
2—' 
9—' 
16—' 



Oct. 
Oct 
Oct 
Nov. 
Not. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec 



8 — "Too Many Millions," five reels, with Wallace Reid. 
16 — "Good-Bye, Bill," five reel*, with Shirley Mason. 
28 — "String Beans," five reels, with Charles Ray. 

88 — "The Mystery Girl," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 
22 — "Quicksand, five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 

89 — "Little Miss Hoover." five reels, with Marguerite Clark. 
39 — "The Hope Chest" five reela, with Dorothy Gish. 
89— "The Way of a Man with a Maid," five reels, with Bryant Wash- 
burn. 

6 — "Out of the Shadow," five reels, with Pauline Frdeerick. 
6 — "Jane Goes a-Wboing." five reels, with Vivian Martin. 
12 — "The Secret Garden/' five reels, with Lila Lec 
19 — "The Du>» " five reels, with Wallace Reid. 
26 — "Venus in the East" five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 
2 — "Hard Boiled," five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 
Feb. 2 — "Happy Though Married," five reels, with Enid Bennett 
Feb. 9 — "Mrs. Wiggs of Cabbage Patch," five reels, with Margaret Clark. 
Feb. 9 — "Two Brides," five reels, with Lina Cavalieri. 
Feb. 9 — "The Girl Dodger," five reels, with Charles Ray. 
Feb. 16 — "Boots," five reels, with Dorothy Gish. 

Feb. 16 — "You Never Saw Such a Girl," five reels, with Vivian Martin. 

Feb. 23 — "Maggie Pepper," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 

Feb. 23 — "Paid in Full," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 

Feb. 28 — "The Winning Girl," five reels, with Shirley Mason. 

Mar. 2 — "Good Gracious, Annabelle," five reels, with Billie Burke. 

Mar. 2 — "Puppy Love," five reels, with Lila Lee. 

Mar. 9 — "The Poor Boob," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 

Mar. 16 — "Three Men and a Girl," five reels with Marguerite Clark. 

Mar. 16 — "Extravagance," five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 

Mar. 23 — "Partners Three," five reels, with Enid Bennett. 

Mar. 23 — "The Sheriff's Son," five reels, with Charles Ray. 

PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT SPECIALS 

Dec 1 — "Sporting Life," seven reels. 
Jan. S — "Little Women," seven reels. 

Feb. 16 — "False Faces," five reels. 

TWO-REEL COMEDIES 

Dec 88 — Flagg, "Perfectly Fiendish Flannagan." 

Jan. 18 — Sennett. "Never Too Old." 

Jan. 19 — Flagg, Impropaganda." 

Jan. 26 — Sennett, "Cupid 1 * Day Out." 

Feb. 2 — Stagg, "One Every Minute." 

Feb. 2 — Drews, "Romance and Rings." 

Feb. 16 — Arbuckle, "Pullman Porter." 

Feb. 9 — Sennett, "Rip & Stitch, Tailors." 

Feb. 23 — Sennett, "East Lynn with Variations." 

Mar. 2 — Arbuckle, "Love." 

Mar. 9— Sennett. "The Village Smithy." 

Mar. 16 — Drew, "Once a Mason." 

Mar. 23— Sennett, "Reilly's Wash Day." 

Mar. 30 — Flagg, ''Beresford of Barboons." 

FOX FILM CORPORATION 

BIG. TIMELY PICTURES 

"The Prussian Cur." All star cast, eight parts. 
"The Land of the Free." All star cast, seven parts. 
"Queen of the Sea." Five parts, with Annette Kellerman. 
"Why I Should Not Marry." All star cast, five parts. 

PRODUCTIONS EXTRAORDINARY 

"Cleopatra." Eight parts, with Theda Bara. 

"Les Miserables." Eight parts, with William Farnum. 

"Salome." Eight parts, with Theda Bara. 

STANDARD PICTURES 

Dec. 1 — "The She-Devil," five reels, with Theda Bara. 
Dec. 15 — "I Want to Forget," five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 
Dec. 29 — "For Freedom," five reels, with William Farnum. 
Jan. 12 — "The Light," five reels, with Theda Bara. 
Jan. 26 — "Woman! Woman I" five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 
Feb. 9 — "Every Mother's Son," five reels, All Star Cast. 
Feb. 23 — "The Man Hunter," five reels, with William Farnum. 
Mar. 9 — "When Men Desire," five reels, with Theda Bara. 
Mar. 23 — "Thou Shalt Not," five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 
Apr. 20 — "Wolves of the Night," five reels, with William Farnum. 
May i — "The Siren's Song," five .reels, with Theda Bara. 

t VICTORY PICTURES 

"The Strange Woman," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 
"I'll Say So," five reels, with George Walsh. 
"Treat 'Em Rough," five reels, with Tom Mix. 
'The Call of the Soul," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 
'Luck and Pluck," five reels, with George Walsh. 
"Hell Roarin' Reform," five reels, with Tom Mix. 
'The Forbidden Room," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 
'Never Say Quit," five reels, with George Walsh. 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Ian. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



19—' 
2—' 
18 — 

2—' 
16—' 
30—' 
13—' 
27—' 



'Fighting for Gold," five reels, with Tom Mix. 
'Pitfalls of New York." five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 
'Help I Help! Police!'' five reels, with George Walsh. 

EXCEL PICTURES 

1 — "Buchanan's Wife," five reels, with Virginia Pearson. 
16 — "Caught in the Act," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 
29 — "The Danger Zone," five reels, with Madlaine Traverse. 
26 — "The Girl with No Regrets," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 

9 — "The Love Auction," five reels, with Virginia Pearson. 
23 — "Smiles," five reels, with Jane and Katherine Lee. 
9 — "Gambling in Souls," five reels, with Madlaine Traverse. 
23 — "The Rebellious Bride," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 
6 — "Married in Haste," five reels, with Albert Ray. 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 

FOX EXTRAVAGANZAS 

Nov. 17— "Fan Fan." 

Nov. 26— "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves." 



52 



EXHIBITORS HERA 



L 



D 



AND MOTOGRAPHY 



THE GREAT NINE SERIES 

Dec. 29 — William Farnum in "Fighting Blood." 

!an. 6 — Theda Bara in "The Serpent." 

an. 12 — "Regeneration." 

an. 19 — William Farnum in "The Broken Law." 

an. 86 — Theda Bara in "Under Two Flags." 
eb. S — "Infidelity" (Dr. Rameau). 
Feb. 9 — Valeska Suratt in "The Soul of Broadway." 

Feb. 1« — Theda Bara in "The Darling of Paris." 

Feb. 28 — William Farnum in "Hoodman Blind." 

WILLIAM FOX SUNSHINE AND TOM MIX COMEDIES 

Dec. 16 — "The Fatal Marriage." 

Dec. 89 — "The Son of a Hun." 

Jan. 12 — Tom Mix in "Hearts and Saddles." 

Ian. 16 — "Oh, What a Knight." 

Feb. 9 — Tom Mix in "A Roman Cowboy." 

Feb. 28— "A Lady Bellhop's Secret." 

Mar. 28 — "Money Talks." 

Feb. 23 — "His Musical Sneeze," two reels. 

Mar. 9 — "Six-Cylinder Love," two reels, with Tom Mix. 

Apr. 6 — "Tom and Jerry," two reels, with Tom Mix. 

Apr. 20 — "The House of Terrible Scandal," two reels. 

May 4 — "A Lady Bell-Hop's Secret," two reels. 

MUTT AND JEFF ANIMATED CARTOON* 

Dec. 22— "The Draft Board." 

Dec. 89 — "Throwing the Bull." 

Ian. 6— "The Lion Tamer." 

Jan. 12 — "Here and There." 

Tan. 19 — "The Hula Cabaret." 

Jan. 26 — "Doggone Tough Luck." 

Feb. 8 — "Landing an Heiress." 

Feb. 9.— "The Bearded Lady." 

Feb. 16 — "S.000 Miles on a Gallon of Gas." 

Feb. 28 — "The Pousse Cafe." 

Mar. 2 — "Fireman, Save My Child." 

Mar. 9 — "Wild Waves and Angry Women." 

Mar. 16 — "William Hohenzollern, Sausage-Maker." 

Mar. 23 — "Out and In Again," half reel. 

Mar. 30 — "A Cow's Husband," half reel. 

Apr. 6 — "Mutt, the Mutt Trainer," half reel. 



GENERAL FILM COMPANY, INC. 

BROADWAY STAR FEATURE 

"Tobin'i Palm," two reels. 

"The Rose of Wolfville," two reels 

"A Ramble in Aphasia," two reels. 

HI I K RIDGE DRAMAS— Ned Flnlrj 
"The Raiders of Sunset Gap," two reels. 
"O'Garry Rides Alone," two reels. 
"The Man from Nowhere." two reels. 

CHAPLIN COMEDIES 

"The Tramp," two reels. 
"Hit New Job," two reels. 
"A Night Out," two reels. 

CRYSTAL FILM COMEDY 

"The Lady Detective and His Wedding Day," split reel. 

"Troubled Waters,' one reel. 

"Her Necklace and His Hoodoo Day," split reel. 

CLOVER COMEDIES 

"From Caterpillar to Butterfly," one reel. 
"A Widow's Camouflage," one reel. 
"Love's Lucky Day," one reel. 
"Oh! the Women/ one reel. 

DUPLEX FILMS, INC. 

"Shame," seven reels. 

EBONY COMEDIES 

"Some Baby," one reel. 

"Good Luck In Old Clothes," one reel. 

"When You Hit. Hit Hard," one reel. 

"A Black and Tan Mix-Up," one reel. 

"Fixing the Faker," one reel. 

"When You're Scared, Run," one reel. 

ESSANAY COMEDIES 
"Slippery Slim's Stratagem," one reel. 
"A Snakeville Epidemic," one reel. 
"A Hot Time in Snakeville," one reel. 
"Snakeville's New Sheriff," one reel. 
"Sophie's Birthday Party," one reel. 

EXPORT AND IMPORT FILM COHP 
' Why — the Bolsheviki," five reels. 

HANOVER FILM COMPANY 

"Camille," six reels. 

"The Marvelous Maeiste," six reels. 

"Monster of Fate."' 

HIGHGRADE FILM ENTERPRISES, Inc. 

"Billie in Society," two reels. 
"Bunco Billy," two reels." 
"BUJy in Harness," two reels 
"Bombs and Bull," two reels. 

COSMOFOTOFILM 

"Hypocrites," six reels. 
"I Believe." six reels. 

AUTHOR'S PHOTOPLAYS. INC. 

"Her Moment," seven reels, drama. 

INTERSTATE FILM COMPANY 

•"The Last Raid of Zeppelin L-tl." 



FORT PITT THEATRE 

The Italian Battlefroat," eight reels. 

OAKDALE PRODUCTIONS 

"No Children Wanted," five reels. 
Miss Mischief Maker." five reels. 
"Little Miss Grown-Up," five reels. 
"The Midnight Burglar," five reels. 
"Wanted, a Brother," five reels. 
"The Locked Heart,*' five reeU. 

OFFICIAL WAS PICTURES 
Committee Public Information 
"Our Bridge of Ships," two reels. 

PROGRESSIVE FILM 
a Fox Farm," one reel. 

RANCHO SERIES 
(All Two-Reel Drama*.) 

'lp the shadow of the Rockies." 
•Where the Sun Sets Red." 

AMERICAN RED CROSS 

"Rebuilding Broken Lives," one reel. 
"Victorious Serbia," one reel. 
"First Aid on the Piave." one reel. 
"The Helping Hand of Sicily." one reel. 

RAINBOW COMEDIES 

"How She Hated Men," one reel. 
"The Camouflage Baby, one reel. 
"The Pipe of Peace," one reel. 
"Hoovenzing," one reel. 

SCRANTONIA PHOTOPLAY CORPORATION 

'Parson Pepp," one reeL 

'Fang's Fate and Fortune," one reel. 

AMERICAN FEATURE FILM CORPORATION 
"Hearts of Love " six reels, with Edna Mayo. 

MAXWELL PRODUCTIONS 
"The Married Virgin," seven reels. 



GOLDWYN PICTURES CORPORATION 

GOLDWYN STAR PRODUCTIONS 

sept. 8— "The Turn of • Wheel," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar 

Sept. 9 — "Peck's Bad Girl," five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Sept. 16 — "Just for Tonight," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Sept. 88 — "The Kingdom of Youth," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Sept. SO — "Laughing Bill Hyde," with Will Rogers. 

Oct. 7— "Hidden Fires." five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Nov. 17 — "Thirty a Week." five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Nov. 84 — "A Perfect 86," five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Dec. 1 — "The Hell Cat," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Dec 8 — "A Perfect Lady." five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Dec. 16 — "Too Fat to Fight," six reels, with Frank Mclntrye. 

Dec. 22 — "The Racing Strain," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Dec 89 — "Go West, Young Man." five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Ian. 12 — "Day Dreams," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Jan. 26 — "Shadows," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Feb. 2— "The Bondage of Barbara," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Feb. 16 — "Sis Hopkins," five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Feb. 28 — "The Woman on the Index," five reels, with Pauline Frederick, 

Mar. 20 — "A Man and His Money," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Mar. 9 — "The Brand." seven reels (Rex Beach Special). 

Mar. 23 — "Daughter of Mine," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Mar. 30 — "Spotlight Sadie," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

GOLDWYN SPECIALS 

"For the Freedom of the World," seven reels. 
"The Manx-Man," seven reels. 

"Heart of the Sunset," seven reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson 
"Blue Blood " six reels. 

"Honor's Cross," six reels, with Howard Heckman. 
"Social Ambition," seven reels. 

"For the Freedom of the East" (Betzwood), six reels. 
"The Border Legion," six reels. 

FORD EDUCATIONAL WEEKLY 

Jan. 18— "What Uncle Sam Will Do for Two Cents." 
Tan. 20— "The Truth About the Liberty Motor." 
Jan. 27— "Hang It All I" 

Feb. 8 — "Carrying Old Glory to the Seven Seas." 
Feb. 10 — "Canada's Mountain of Tears." 
Feb. 17 — "Where 'The Spirit That Won' Was Born." 
Feb. 84— "Rough Stuff." 

CAPITOL COMEDIES 

Nov. 17 — "A Pair of Pink Pajamas," two reels. 

Dec. 1 — "Proposing Bill," two reels. 

Dec. 16— 'The Jelly Fish," two reels. 

Dec. 89— "Poor Innocent," two reels. 

Jan. 18 — "You Know What I Mean," two reels. 

Jan. 26 — "The Big Idea." 

Feb. 7 — "Have Another." 

Feb. 23 — "A Master of Music." 

"GO-GET-'EM" POTTS SERIES 

Mar. 9 — "The New Breakfast Food." 
Mar. 23— "The Potum of Swat." 
Apr. 6 — "The MidniRht Alarm " 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



BENNlSON STAR SERIES 

"Oh, Johnny," five reels, with Louis Bennison. 

"Sandy Burke of the U-Bar U," five reels, with Louis Bennison. 
'^Speedy Meade." five reels, with Louis Bennison. 
"High Pockets, ' five reels, with Louis Bennison. 



W. W. HODKINSON CORPORATION 

(Available Through Pathe Exchanges.) 

Dec 80 — "The Challenge Accepted," five reels, with Zena Keefe. 

Jan. 6 — "The Drifters," five reels, with J. Warren Kerrigan. 

Jan. 20 — "The Law That Divides," five reels, with Kathleen Clifford. 

Jan. 27 — "Fighting Through," six reels, with E. K. Lincoln. 

Feb. 10 — "Come Again Smith." five reels, with J. Warren Kerrigan. 

Feb. 16 — "Made in America, first episode of eight one-reel series. 

Feb. 23 — "The Love Hunger," five reels, with Lillian Walker. 

Mar. 9 — "The Forfeit," five reels, with House Peters and Jane Miller. 

Mar. 23 — "The End of the Game," five reels, with J. Warren Kerrigan. 



METRO PICTURE CORPORATION 

Dec 2 — "The Testing of Mildren Vane," fiv ereels, with May Allison. 

Dec 9 — "Hitting the High Spots," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

Dec 16— "Sylvia on a Spree, five reels, with Emmy Wehlan. 

Dec 28 — "The Poor Rich Man," five reels, with Francis X. Bushman. 

Dec. 80 — "Her Inspiration," five reels, with May Allison. 

Jan. 6 — "The Gold Cure," five reels, with Viola Dana. 

Jan. 18— "The Spender," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

Jan. 20 — "The Divorcee," five reels, with Ethel fiarrymore. 

Jan. 27 — "In for Thirty Days," five reels,, with May Allison. 

Feb. 3 — "Faith," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

Feb. 10 — "As the Sun Went Down," five reels, with Edith Storey. 

Feb. 17 — "Johnny on the Spot," five reels, with Hale Hamilton. 

Feb. 24 — "Peggy Does Her Darndest," five reels, with May Allison. 

Mar. 3 — "Satan Junior," five reels, with Viola Dana. 

Mar. 10 — "Blind Man's Eyes," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

Mar. 17 — "The Way of the Strong," five reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson. 

Mar. 24 — "That's Good," five reels, with Hale Hamilton. 

Mar. 31 — "Jeanne of the Gutter," five reels, with Viola Dana. 

SCREEN CLASSICS. INC.. SPECIALS 

"Draft 268," seven reels, with Mabel Taliaferro. 

"Blue Jeans," seven reels, with Viola Dana. 

"Lest We Forget," eight reels, with Rita Jolivet. 

"The Legion of Death," seven reels, with Edith Storey. 

"My Own United States," eight reels, with Arnold Daly. 

"The Million Dollar Dollies," five reels, with the Dolly Sisters. 

"To Hell With the Kaiser." seven reels. 

"Pals First," six reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

"The Great Victory, Wilson or the Kaiser, the Fall of the Hohenzollerns," 
seven reels. 

"Why Germany Must Pay," six reels, All Star Cast. 
"The Great Romance," six reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

"Shadows of Suspicion," five reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

NAZIMOVA PRODUCTIONS 

"Revelation," seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Toys of Fate," seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Eye for Eye," seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Out of the Fog," seven reels, with Nazimova. 



PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

PATHE SPECIAL, FEATURES 

Sept. 8 — "Her Man," six reels, with Elaine Hammerstein. 
Dec. 1 — "Infatuation," six reels, with Gaby Deslys. 
Mar. 2 — "Common Clay," seven reels, with Fannie Ward. 
Apr. 27 — "Stars of Glory," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli and E. K. 
Lincoln. 

EXTRA SELECTED STAR PHOTOPLAYS 

Sept. 22 — "A Japanese Nightingale," five reels, with Fannie Ward. 
Nov. 17 — "The Bells," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
Dec. 15 — "The Narrow Path," five reels, with Fannie Ward. 
Jan. 12 — "The Midnight Stage," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
Feb. 9 — "Todd of the Times," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
Mar. 9 — "Carolyn of the Corners," five reels, with Bessie Love. 

PATHE PROGRAM FEATURES 

Oct. 5 — "The Border Raiders," five reels, with Betty Compson and George 
Larkin. 

Dec. 1 — "Milady o' the Beanstalk," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne. 
Dec. 29 — "Dolly's Vacation." five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne. 
Jan. 26 — "A Vagabond of France," four reels, with Henri Krauss. 
Feb. 23 — "The Old Maid's Baby," five reels, with Marie Osborne. 
Mar. 23 — "Go Get 'Em Garringer," five reels, with Helene Chadwick. 



PERFECTION PICTURES 
m 7 — Kleine, "Quo Vadis," eight reels. 

an. 10 — Selig, "Brown of Harvard," six reels, with Tom Moore and Hazel 
Daly. 

Feb. 1— Essanay, "Men Who Have Made Love to Me," six reels, with Mary 

MacLane. 

Essanay, "Ruggles of Red Gap." six reels, with Taylor Holmes. 

Jan. 21 — Edison, "The Unbeliever," seven reels, with Raymond McKee. 

Essanay, "A Pair of Sixes," six reels, with Taylor Holmes. 

Essanay, "The Curse of Iku," seven reels, with Frank Borzage. 

Edison, 'The Wall Invisible." six reels, with Shirley Mason. 



SELECT PICTURES CORPORATION 



Nov. — "Her Great Chance," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Nov. — "Road Through the Dark," five reels, with Clara Kimball Young. 

Dec. — "The Heart of Wetona,' five reels, with Norma Talmadge. 

Dec. — "In the Hollow of Her Hand," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Dec. — "A Lady's Name," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Dec. — "Code of the Yukon," five reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 



Jan. — "Who Cares, five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Jan. — "Cheating Cheaters," five reels, with Clara Kimball Young. 

Jan. — "The Indestructible Wife," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Feb. — "Romance and Arabella," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Feb. — "The Belle of New York," five reels, with Marion Davies. 

Feb. — "Children of Banishment," five reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 

Feb. —"The World to Live In/* five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Mar. — "The Probation Wife," six reels, with Norma Talmadge. 

Mar. —"Experimental Marriage," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Mar. — "Marie, Ltd.," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

SPECIALS 

"The One Woman," with All-star cast. 

"The Cavell Case, with Julia Arthur. 

"The Midnight Patrol," an Ince Production. 

"Ruling Passions," with Julia Dean and Edwin Arden. 

"The Hidden Truth," six reels, with Anna Case. 

"Over There," six reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson and Charles Richman. 

TRIANGLE FILM CORPORATION 

Sept. 8 — "Mystic Faces," five reels, with Jack Abbe. 

Sept. 16 — "The Atom," five reels, with Pauline Starke. 

Sept 22 — "Desert Law," five reels, with Jack Richardson. 

Sept. 29 — 'The Grey Parasol," five reels, with Claire Anderson. 

Oct. 6 — "Tony America," five reels, with Francis McDonald. 

Oct 18 — "The Pretender," five reels, with William Desmond 

Nov. 17 — "Reckoning Day," five reels, with Belle Bennett. 

Dec 1 — "Love's Pay Day," five reels, with Rosemary Tbeby. 

Nov. 24 — "Deuce Duncan, five reels, with William Desmond. 

Dec. 8 — "The Silent Rider," five reels, with Roy Stewart 

Dec. 16— "Irish Eyes, " five reels, with Pauline tSarke. 

Dec. 22 — "Crown Jewels," five reels, with Claire Anderson. 

Dec. 29 — "Wife or Country," five reels, with Gloria Swanson. 

Jan. 26 — "Unto the End," five reels, with Crane Wilbur. 

Feb. 2 — "Restless Souls," five reels, with Alma Rubens. 

Feb. 9 — "Secret Marriage," five reels, with Mary MacLaren. 

Feb. 16 — "Child of M'sieu," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne 

Feb. 23 — "Breezy Jim," five reels, with Crane Wilbur. 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. COMPANY 

BLUEBIRD PHOTOPLAYS 

Oct. 7— "The Lure of Luxury," five reels, with Ruth Clifford.' 

Oct. 14 — "Together," five reels, with Violet Mersereau. 

Nov. 18 — "Hugon, the Mighty," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 

Nov. 26 — "Dealing with Daphne," five reels, with Priacilla Dean. 

Nov. 26— "All Night," five reels, with Carmel Myers. 

Dec. 9 — "Set Free,' five reels, with Edith Roberts. 

Dec. 16— "The Cabaret Girl," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 

Dec. 28 — "The Light of Victory," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 

Dec. 30 — "The Sea Flower," five reels, with Juanita Hansen. 

Dec. 80— "The Cabaret Girl," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 

Jan. 6 — "The Natures Girl," five reels, with Violet Mesereau. 

Jan. 13 — "The Craving," five reels, with Francis Ford. 

Jan. 20 — "The Game's Up," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 

Jan. 27 — "Who Will Marry Me?" five reels, with Carmel Meyers. 

Feb. 3 — "Sue of the South," five reels, with Edith Roberts. 

Feb. 10 — "Millionaire Pirate," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 

Feb. 17 — "Sealed Envelope," five reels, with Fritzi Brunette. 

Feb. 24 — "The Little White Savage," five reels, Carmel Meyers. 

BLUEBIRD SPECIALS 

"Eagle's Wings," five reels, war drama. 

"Lven as You and I," five reels, with Lois Weber. 

"Come Through," seven reels, with Herbert Rawlinson. 

UNIVERSAL FEATURES 

Sept. 9 — "Modern Love," five reels, with Mae Murray. 

Sept 28 — "The Talk of the Town." six reels, with Dorothy Phillips. 

Oct. 6 — "Fighting for Freedom. 

Oct. 12 — "Three Mounted Men," five reels, with Harry Carey. 

Nov. 18 — "Kiss or Kill," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 
Dec. 2 — "Vanity Pool," five reels, with Mary Maclaren. 

Dec. 16 — "Wild Cat of Paris," five reels, witJi Priscilla Dean. 

Dec. 80 — "Danger, Go Slow," five reels, with Mae Murray. 

Jan. 13 — "After the War," five reels, with Grace Cunard. 

Jan. 27 — "Roped," five reels, with Harry Carey. 

Feb. 10 — "Creaking Stairs," five reels, with Mary MacLaren. 

Feb. 24 — "The Wicked Darling," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 

Mar. 10 — "The Scarlet Shadow," six reels, with Mae Murray. 

Mar. 17 — "Light of Victory," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 

Mar. 24 — "A Fight for Love," six reels, Special, with Harry Carey. 



VITAGRAPH 

"By the World Forgot," five reels, with Hedda Nova. 

"The Girl of Today," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

"A Diplomatic Mission," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

"The Mating," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

"The King of Diamonds," five reels, with Harry Morey. 

"Everybody's Girl," five reels, _ with Alice Joyce. 

"Miss Ambition," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

"The Dawn of Understanding," five reels, with Bessie Love. 

"The Man Who Wouldn't Tell," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

"The Beloved Imposter," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

"Hoarded Assets,' five reels, with Harry Morey. 

"The Captain's Captain," five reels, with Alice Joyce. 

"The Adventure Shop," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

Jan. 27 — "The Enchanted Barn," five reels, with Bessie Love. 

Feb. 8 — "The Highest Trump," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

Feb. 10 — "Fortune's Child." five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

Feb. 17 — "Silent Strength," five reels, with Harry Morey. 

Feb. 24 — "The Lion and the Mouse" (special — Alice Joyce). 

Mar. 8 — "The Girl Problem," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

Mar. 10 — "The Wishing Ring Man." five reels, with Bessie Love. 

Mar. 10 — "From Headquarters," Special, five reels, with Anita Stewart. 

Mar. 17 — "A Gentleman of Quality," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

Mar. 24 — "Miss Dulcie from Dixie," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

Mar. 31 — "Fighting Destiny," five reels, with Harry T. Morey. 

Apr. 7 — "The Cambric Mask," five reels, with Alice Joyce. 

Apr. 14 — "The Unknown Quantity," five reels, with Corinne Gri..th. 

Apr. 21 — "A Yankee Princess," five reels, with Bessie Love. 



{ 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



WORLD FILM CORPORATION 

Oct. 7— "The Appearance of Evil," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

Oct. 14 — "The Road to France," five reels, with Carlyle BlackwelL 
Dec 9 — "Hitting the Trail," 6ve reels, with Carlyle BlackweU. 
Dec » — "The Man of Bronze," five reels, with Lewis S. Stoat 

Dec. Id — "The Zero Horn," five reels, with June Elvidge, 

Nov. 18 — "Just Sylvia," five reels, with Barbara Castleton. 

Nov. 26— "The Grough " five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Dec 28 — 'The Love Net," five reels, with Madge Evans. 

Dec 80 — 'The Sea Waif," five reels, with Louise Huff. 

ian. 6 — "What Love Forgives," five reels, with Barbara Castletoa. 
an. 8— "Under Four Flag*," five reels, 

an. 18 — "Love in a Hurry," five reels, with Carlyle BlackweU. 

an. 20 — "The Bluffer," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

an. 317 — "Heart of Gold," five reels, with Louise Huff. 
Feb. 3 — "The Roughneck," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Feb. 10 — "Mandarin's Gold," five reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Feb. 17 — "Courage for Two," five reels, with Carlyle BlackweU. 

Feb. 24 — "The Moral Deadline," five reels, with Frank Mayo. 

Mar. 8 — "Crook of Dreams," five reels, with Louis Huff. 

Mar. 10 — "The Unveiling Hand," five reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Mar. 17 — "The Hand Invisible, five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Mar. 24 — "Hit or Miss," five reels, with Carlyle BlackweU. 

Mar. 31 — "Love Defender," five reels, with Madge Evans. 

Apr. 7 — "The Little Intruder," five reels, with Johnny Hines. 



Apr. 14 — "The Scar," five reels, with Irving Cummings. 

Apr. 21 — "The Quickening Flame," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

UMTICD PICTURE THEATRES 

Jan. 5 — "The Light of Western Stars," seven reels, with Dustin Farnam. 
Jan. 26 — "Adele," six reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Feb. 23 — "A Man in the Open," five reels, with Dustin Farnum. 
■ — "Her Code of Honor," five reels, with Florence Reed. 

SERIALS 

Wharton, "The Eagle's Eye" 

Pathe, "The House of Hate" 

Vitagraph, 'The Woman in the Web." 

Universal, "The Lion's Claws." 

Vitagraph, "A Fight for Millions." 

Universal, "The Brass Bullet." 

Gaumont, 'The Hand of Vengeance." 

Pathe, "Hands Up." 

Pathe, "Wolves of Kulture." 

Universal, "The Lure of the Circus." 

Francis Ford. 'The Silent Mystery." 

Vitagraph, "The Man of Might," William Duncan. 

Pathe, f 'Tbe Lightning Raider," Pearl White. 

Universal, "The Red Glove," Marie Walcamp. 

Pathe, "Terror of the Range," with George Larkin. 




THE OPEN MARKET 



STATE RIGHTS ISSUES 



SPECIAL PRODUCTIONS 



ARROW FILM CORPORATION 

'The Deemster," nine reels, with Derwent Hall Caine. 

'The Accidental Honeymoon," six reels, with Robert Warwick. 

"The Million-Dollar Mystery," six reels. 

"My Husband's Friend," five reels. 

"Perfect Model," re-issue of "Inspiration," five reels. 

"Finger of Justice," six reels. 

"Sunset Princess." 

ATLANTA DISTRIBUTING CO. 

"Nine-Tenths of the Law," six reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 
"The Devil's Playground, seven reels. 

REX REACH PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Barrier," ten reels. 

REAR STATE FILM COMPANY 
"The Vigilantes," seven reels. 

DAVID BERNSTEIN 

"Redemption," with Evelyn Nesblt Thaw. 



'The Pale Pack Train," one reel. 
"Nature — Hot and Cold." one reel. 
"Men Met in the Mountains," one reel. 
"Before Breakfast," one reel. 



Jan. 31 — "Bringing the Boys Back Home," one reel. 

Feb. 1 — "Photoplay Magazine Screen Supplement," one reel. 

Feb. 3 — "Indian Life," one reel. 

Feb. 10 — "An Indian Love Story," one reel. 

Feb. 17 — "A Day With Caranza," one reel. 

Feb. 24 — "What Is a Mexican," one reel. 

Mar. 3 — "The Washington Air Patrol," one reel. 

EFFANGE FILM COMPANY 

"The Marriage Bond," five reels, with Nat Goodwin. 

EMERALD MOTION PICTURE CORPORATION 

"A Slacker's Heart," five reels. 

ENLIGHTENMENT PHOTOPLAY CORPORATION 

"Enlighten Thy Daughter," seven reels. 



CARDINAL FILM CORPORATION 
"Joan the Woman," eleven reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 



ESKAY HARRIS FEATURE FILM COMPANY 

"Alice in Wonderland," six reels. 



CHRISTIE FILM COMPANY 



EUGENIC FILM COMPANY 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



9 — "Five Hundred or Bust." 
Jan. 16— -"Oh, Baby." 
Jan. 23 — "Good Gracious, Bobby." 
Jan. 30 — "You Couldn't Blame Her." 
6 — "For Love or Money." 
13 — "Salvation Sue." 
20— "Four of a Kind." 
27 — "Welcome Home." 
Bobby Comes Marching Home." 
"Brides for Two." 
"Oh, What a Night." 
"Hard Luck." 
"Marrying Molly." 

CLCNE PRODUCTIONS 

"Ramona," eight reels. 

"The Eyes of the World," seven reels. 

COMMONWEALTH PICTURES CORPORATION 

'The Frozen Warning," five reels, with Charlotte. 
"Spanuth's Original Vod-A-Vil Movies." 

CORONA CINEMA COMPANY 
'The Curse of Eve," seven reels, with Enid Markey. 

CREATIVE FILM CORPORATION 
"The Gir! Who Didn't Think," six reels. 

CREST PICTURES CORPORATION 
The Chosen Prince," eight reels. 
"The Grain of Dust," six reels, with Lillian Walker. 
"A Romance of the Air," five reels, with Lieut. Bert Hall. 

EDUCATIONAL FILMS CORPORATION 
(Robert C. Bruce Scenict) 
"The Wolf of the Tetons," one reel. 
"Nature — Rest and Motion," one reel. 
"Horizon Hunters," one reel. 
'The High Horse," one reel. 



"Birth," six reels. 



EXPORT ft IMPORT FILM COMPANY 

"Humility." 

"Ivan the Terrible," six reels. 
"Loyalty." 

"Robespierre," seven reels. 
"Tyranny of the Romanoffs." 

FELIX F. FEIST 

"Stolen Orders," eight reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS' CIRCUIT, INC. 

"Tarzan of the Apes," six reels, with Elmo Lincoln. 
"Fall of the Romanoffs," eight reels, with Nance O'Neill. 
"Empty Pockets " seven reels. 

"The Passing of the Third Floor Back," with Sir Johnston Forbes-RobertM* 

"A Dog's Life," two reels, with Charlie Chaplin. 

Ambassador Gerard's "My Four Years in Germany." 

"The Life Mask," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 

"The Light Within," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 

"Daughter of Destiny," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 

"Tempered Steel," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 

"Italy's Flaming Front." Italian official war film. 

"Pershing's Crusaders. 

"Romance of Tarzan," six reels, with Elmo Lincoln. 
"Shoulder Arms," three reels, with Charles Chaplin. 
"The Panther Woman," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 
"Virtuous Wives," six reels, with Anita Stewart. 
"Our Teddy," seven reels. 
"Sunnyside," two reels, with Charles Chaplin. 

FOUR SQUARE PICTURE8 

"Madame Sherry," five reels, with Gertrude McCoy. 

"The Submarine Eye," seven reels. 

"Should She Obey," seven reels, with Alice Wilson. 

"The Great White Trail," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"One Hour," six reels, with Zena Keefe 

"The Cast-Off," five reels, with Bessie barriscale. 

"Men." 

"A Woman's Experience," seven reels, with Mary Boland. 



55 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



FRATERNITY FILMS, INC. 

"The Devil'* Playground." with Vera Michelena. 
"The Witching Hour," six reels, with Jack Sherrill. 
"Conquest of Canaan," five reels. 

FRIEDMAN ENTERPRISES. INC. 
"A Mormon Maid," six reels, with Mae Murray. 

F ROHM AN AMUSEMENT CORPORATION 

"God's Man," nine reels, with H. B. Warner. 
"My Own United States," with Arnold Daly. 
"Once to Every Man," six reels, with Jack Sherrill. 

HARRY GARSON 
"The Hushed Hour," five reels, with Blanche Sweet. 
"The Unpardonable Sin," eight reels, with Blanche Sweet. 

GENERAL ENTERPRISES 

"The Liar," six reels, with Jane Gail. 

"Mother," six reels, with Elizabeth Risdon. 

"The Warrior," seven reels, with Maciste. 

"Crucible of Life," seven reels, with Grace Darmond. 

GRAPHIC FILM COMPANY 

"The Woman and the Beast," five reels. 
"Moral Suicide," seven reels, with Leah Baird. 
"When Men Betray," six reels, with Gail Kane. 

D. W. GRIFFITH 

"The Birth of a Nation," nine reels, with H. B. Walthall. 
"Intolerance," nine reels, with Mae Marsh. 

"Hearts of the World," with Dorothy Qsh, Lillian Gish and Robert Ham 
HOPP HADLEY 

"The Vow." 

HANOVER FILM COMPANY 

"Maciste," six reels. 

HARPER FILM. CORPORATION 

'Civilization," ten reels. 

HAWK FILM CORPORATION 
"Monster of Fate," five reels. 

HERALD FILM CORPORATION 
"Around the World in 80 Days," six reels. 

KILLER AND WLLK 

"Raffles," six reels, with John Barrymore. 
"The Battle of Gettysburg." 
"Wrath of the Gods." 
"Woman," eight reels. 

"The Silent Mystery," 15-part serial, with Francis Ford. 

HISTORIC FEATURE FILMS 

A»r. iO— "Christus." 



THOS. H. LNCE 
"The Bargain," six reels, with W. S. Hart. 



IVAN FILM PRODUCTIONS 
"Babbling Tongues." five reels, with Grace Valentine. 
'Married in Name Only," six reels, with Milton Sills. 
"Human Clay," with Mollie King. 

"Sins of Ambition," with Wilfred Lucas and Barbara Castleton. 

Life or Honor," seven reels, with Leah Baird. 



JEWEL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

"The Doctor and the Woman," five reels, with Mildred Harris. 

For Hnsbands Only," five reels, with Mildred Harris. 
"The Geezer of Berlin." 
The Sinking of the Lusitania." 
"Crashing Through to Berlin," seven parts. 



JESTER COMEDIES 
One two-reel comedy a month, with Twede Dan. 

JAMES KEANE 
"The Spreading Evil," seven reels. 

LEA-RELL COMPANY 
"Modern Mother Goose," five reels. 
"Snow White," four reels. 

MASTER DRAMA FEATURES, INC. 
"Who's Your Neighbor?" seven reels, with Christine Mayo. 

MAYFAIR FILM CORPORATION 
"Persuasive Peggy," six reels, with Peggy Hyland. 

R. S. MOSS 

"The Power of Evil," five reels. 

"The Girl Who Doesn't Know," five reels. 

"In the Hands of the Law," five reels. 



NEWFIELD'S PRODUCING CORPORATION 
"Alma, Where Do You Live," six reels, with Ruth McTammany. 



JOHN W. NORLE PRODUCTIONS. ENG. 
"Shame," six reds, with Zeaa Keefe. 

OGDEN PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Lust of the Ages," five reels, with Lillian Walker. 

SIDNEY OLCOTT PLAYLETS, INC. 
"The Belgian," with Walker Whiteside and Valentine Grant. 

OVERLAND PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Hand of Fate." 
'The Russian Revolution." 
"Man's Law." 

PARAGON FILM COMPANY 
The Whip," eight reels. 

LEONCE FERRET PRODUCTIONS 
"Sun of Glory," six reels, with Dolores CassinellL 

"A Soul Adrift," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli. 

HARRY RAFF 
The Mad Lover," with Robert Warwick. 
The Struggle Everlasting," with Florence Reed. 
"Wanted for Murder," five reels, with Elaine Hammerstein. 

HARRY RAYER 
'The Public Defender," with Frank Keenan. 
"The Hand of the Hun," four reels. 
"The Master Crook " 
'The Liberator," serial, with Maciste. 

RIALTO DBS LUXE PRODUCTION" 

"The Unchastened Woman," seven reels. 
"Conquered Hearts." 

SCREEN CRAFT PICTURES 

"The Prodigal Wife," six reels, with Mary Boland. 

SELECT PHOTOPLAY COMPANY 
"Humanity," six reels. 

8ELIO SPECIALS 
"The Crisis," seven reels, with Bessie Eyton. 

"Beware of Strangers," seven reels, with Bessie Eyton and Thomas S ans sh t 
"The Garden of Allah," ten reels, with Thomas Santehi and Helen War*. 
"Who Shall Take My Life," six reels, with Thomas Santehi ana Pitas* 

Brunette. 

"The City of Purple Dreams," six reels, with Bessie Eyton and Taasaas 
Santehi. 

FRANK J. SENG 

"Parentage." 

SELZNICK PICTURE CORP. 
"Upstairs and Down," five reels, with Olive Thomas. 

S-L PICTURES 
"Virtuous Men," with E. K. Lincoln. 

WILLIAM STOERMER ENTERPRISES 
"The Tidal Wave," eight reels. 

SOUTHERN FEATURE FILM COMPANY 
"Beyond the Law," six reels, with Enunett Dalton. 



ERNEST SHIPMAN 

LLOYD CARLETON PRODUCTIONS 

"Mother, I Need You," five reels, with Enid Markey. 

UNITED FILMS PRODUCTION 

"The Crime of the Hour," five reels. 

PRIVATE FEATURE FILMS 

"Ignorance," six reels. 

AL AND FRANK JENNINGS PRODUCTIONS 
"Lady of the Dugout," six reels. 

FORD PHOTOPLAY 
"Berlin Via American," six reels, with Francis Ford. 
"A Man of Today," six reels, with Francis Ford. 
"The Fourth Generation," six reels. 



WILLIAM L. SHERRY SERVICE. 

"Romance of the Underworld," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"The Street of Seven Stars," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Out of the Night," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"The Inn of the Blue Moon," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Marriage," five reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"Red Blood and Yellow," five reels, with Bronco Billy. 

"Wild Honey," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Son of a Gun," five reels, with BToncho Billy* 

"Marriage for Convenience," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"Calibre .38." 

"Twilight," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Love and the Law," six reels. (Edgar Lewis production.) 

U. S. EXHIBITORS BOOKING CORP. 
"The Zeppelin's Last Raid," five reels, with Enid Markey. 
"Those Who Pay," five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 

EDWARD WARREN PRODUCTIONS 
"Souls Redeemed," with Sheldon Lewis and Charlotte Ives. 

L LAWRENCE WERER PRODUCING CO. 
"Weavers of Life," five reels, with Helen Hayes and Howard Hall. 

WESTERN IMPORT 
"Mickey," seven reels, with Mabel Normand. 




SO. DEARBORN ST. n„, e red as second ela. 



MARTIN J . Q U I G LEY , PUBLISHER 



ss matter, August :o, 1917, at the Post OfHce 







ONE DOLLAR 
■MM 



mal Comment the 

by MartinJ- QtjiGi^y 



Revenue 

v s who are endeavoring to 
legislature a stale cc 
nk asfji their. 4Jti\i 
ut nftlij 
suddenly concluded 
erlooki|igja big op- 
ribuj 

franBylstate that 
is designed to add 



hip 

attention of those 
welfare of the in- 
s to the situaj 

Chicago. 

gentlemeja^of the 
the induJFry and, 
m their ■iewpoint 
and all Mi at goes 
politics. ■ Judging 
if the biS had not 
hances omits being 

d be exc«ent. 

'ie Chieag^Cen- 
for the {Ikin- 

•"n pictui 
: r-ago cen- 



is totaU^i inconsistent with t 
portance. The wilL^rthe majority is the o 
*l*sis_of law jKid tMell'ort of the wild-eyed ? 

Ks wjWiipon the majority is only 
ot anarcj^ We have i/^i prohibitior 



:ture 



.teunuay clos 
it is - • m> 

ntyMoT the screen wi 
this tenMncy, in giving t 
masses, ^hose attention ft 
any otliB 1 form of '»pression, a con^et 
in<r of \ spirit o[^a^^0^Ammmfm 



ing to ri 
quad 



s, in censor 
that the 
und in cc 
and fil 
greater degi 
,ete undei 
e that is & 
it a slave to the will of that minority 



Looking Ahead 

I N a dispatch to the Herald from its Washingt 
*■ correspondent, printed in last week's issue, Mr. 
W. W: Hodkinson visualizes a condition into which 
the motion picture is rapidly moving. Mr. Hodkin- 
son Contends that the day is passed, or practically so, 
when the producer can rely merely upon a winsome 
face and pretty curl to carry his picture into popu- 
larity. The public has passed the stage in which it is 
satisfied with merely a pretty face upon the screen. 
They want players who can do more than merely 
"look"' — they want real acting inspired by general 
intelligence and an understanding of the technics of 
•motional appeal. 

i^Sundc 

»f the many contests that aro 



E X II I B I T () R S 



HERALD 



AND M O T O G R A P H Y 




3 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPH Y 

STATE RIGHT BUYERS 




For Territory Rights address 

J. FRANK HATCH ENTERPRISES, Inc. 

9 12 LONG A C R E BUILDING 
N E W YORK CI T Y 

6 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




P. S.Harrison, in Motion 
Picture News, March 1 st 
issue, says of the last 
William Russell release: 

"With 'Where the West 
Begins' Russell adds an- 
other good picture to the 
long list of his successes. 
The plot is full of action and 
it has been handled well. It 
holds the interest undimin- 
ished from start to finish." 



WILLIAM 
RUSSELL 

« IN 

BRASS 
BUTTONS 




By STEPHEN FOX 



Directed by HENRY KING 




LADIES will gasp at the 
way Russell woos and 
wins the society girl he 
thought a ladies , maid. 

MEN will thoroughly 
enjoy the scenes in 
which Russell, as a New 
York cop, bluffs the gun- 
men of Sawtooth, Ari- 
zona, who had boasted 
that no sheriff could 
tame them. 

EXHIBITORS will pro- 
claim this picture one of 
the peppiest they ever 
screened and make ar- 
rangements to repeat it. 

WILLIAM RUSSELL PRODUCTIONS 

Distributed by 

PATHE 

William Russell Successes Now Available: 
"Hobbs in a Hurry" 
"AH the World to Nothing" 
"When a Man Rides Alone" 
"Where the Weil Begins" 



7 




— / m 



HALL 





Tl\e Lotvo 

Latve^r T\irrvirvO 

Produced by THE NATIONAL FILM CORPORATION OF AMERICA 

A timely and forceful subject that has strong advertising features 
in It's bearing on the prohibition situation. It naaa mighty appeal 
to every audience in the forcefulness of it's gripping story. It is 
from the book by Hallie Erminie Rives. One of the bi66est 
popular ficlion successes in years 

ROBERTSON - COL.E 
through C O s] M P^AK 

EXHIBITORS MUTUAL ssrs&'SSEK 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




She has done it again — 

Anita Stewart in "A Midnight Romance 

the first time thejPicture'was shown anywhere 

played to 762 MORE paid admissions 

than "Virtuous Wives'* the first day at the Garden Theatre 
in Paterson> N. J. 

The Reason: It s a Woman's Picture 

Directed by Lois Weber, Maker of Money-Makers 
Story by Marion Orth, Author of "The Price of a Good Time" 
Produced by Louis B. Mayer 




A First National Money-Maker 



EXHIBITORS HERALD 'AND MOTOGRAPHY 



A GREAT 
SERIAL 



"The Demon's Shadow" 



The Reissue Extraordinary 
Featuring 

Mitchell Lewis 
Marguerite Snow 

For First Run Contracts in Indiana and Illinois 

APPLY TO 

AL. ROSENTHAL 



Suite 402 
220 So. State Street 
CHICAGO 




MITCHELL LEWIS 



S^ ta G i*5£E: "THE LAW OF NATURE" 




Ready Soon 
for 

State Rights 



ARROW FILM CORPORATION 

Exclusive Sales Agents 

Times Bldg. New York 

10 



Nineteen Nineteen's 
Most Massive and 
Impressive Feature 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




DID YOU EVER! 

PLAY A SURE THING? 

Over 300 Exhibitors have 
Played this Great Surprise 

MICKEY" 

$ Mickey $ Mickey $ Mickey $ Mickey $ 

Ask the Exhibitor who played this Sensational 
Wonder play. Give yourself a treat. 

Mickey Film Corporation, February 24, 1919. 

220 S. State St.. 
Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen : ....... 

I never believed it possible that my house, with a seating capacity of 2600. could maintain a picture over three days. My third day on my 
largest picture has always gone for naught, but with "Mickey" I must confess, after playing an engagement of three days, I was forced to extend 
the engagement two more days. . 

I do not believe there will be a production to equal "Mickey" as to drawing power and pleasing of 100 per cent for a long time to come. I 
am thinking seriously of bringing this picture back for two days in the near future and will be glad to hear from you as to open dates. 
Wishing you and "Mickev" the most deserving success, I am, Yours very truly, 

COVENT GARDEN THEATRE, 

Samuel Trinz, Manager. 

Mickey Film Corporation, 
220 S. State St., 

Chicago, 111. February 8, 1919. 

Gentlemen: ..... , . 

Congratulations on securing "Mickey" for this state, as it is the biggest drawing card put out in years. As you know I started at the 
Pantheon Theatre Februarv 4th, and ran five days, every day being bigger than the day previous. 

"Mickey" has broken all records for the Pantheon Theatre, also broken all precedents of the house by running a picture more than three 
\ davs. It is a clean up.'' 

\ Sorry I cannot hold it over, as I have another big production booked tn follow it up. 

\ Yours very truly. 

\ PANTHEON THEATRE, 

4f Martin A. Saxe, Mgr. 

A. \< 




NOW ARRANGING BOOKINGS FOR ILLINOIS 



MICKEY FILM CORPORATION 



Consumers Building, Chicago Illinois 



\ 



F. O. NIELSEN, 
Gen. Mgr. 



PHONE : 
Wabash 373 



1 1 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




NEW ANNUAL 

Subs cnptions to 
EXHIBITORS HERALD & MOTOGRAPHY 

were received m week 
endingf Saturday, March 15 



The HERALD is the 

trade paper wide-awake 
exhibitors buy — and read 



Books and accounts of the HERALD are open 
to advertisers for verification of this statement. 

12 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




IT ENTERTAINS! IT THRILLS! 
IT LEAVES A THOUGHT BEHIND! 



james.keAnFs 



Now In Its Second Week at Band Box Theatre, Chicago 



Hon. Josephus Daniels, Sec. of Navy- 
says: "It is a powerful portrayal 
of an evil to whose ravages the 
public must be awakened." 



Hon. Julius Kahn, father of the 
Draft Bill, says: "I wish your pic- 
ture drama could be seen by all 
the boys and girls in our schools." 




There's a love story of pure unsul- 
lied devotion. 

There's a murder mystery, who 
killed the artist 



She was waiting at the altar; he 
discovers he must not marry. 




Send for free descriptive matter. The most artistic and elaborate 

ever prepared on any picture. 

it's a SIMEON GREIVER PRODUCTION 

6th FLOOR FILM EXCHANGE BLDG. Harrison 2451 207 SO. WABASH AVE., CHICAGO 

Exclusive Distributor Illinois, Indiana and Southern Wisconsin 



P.S. DID YOU SEE OUR PAGE AD IN SUNDAY'S CHICAGO HERALD EXAMINER? 



3 




It Excites That Bump of Curiosity In Every Audience 



fl^oiaflMiz^^afaa^ & mi MimAmm^LMi m. 

13 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHV 




CJhe 



LINK 



BETWEEN 



'PRODUCTION 

AND 

'Perfection 



After each operation our gears 
— both Bronze and Steel — are 
placed in special compartment 
boxes that protect them from all 
injury. 

The same careful thought 
which suggested this, governs 
every step in the manufacture of 
our product. It is one of the 
big factors in maintaining the 

SUPREME PERFECTION of 

Powers Cameragraph 

Catalogue No. 19 
gives full details 



Nicholas Power Company 

INCORPORATED 

Pioneers of Projection 
90 Gold Street New York, N. Y 




Editorial Cqmmbnt q£ the WMk 



i mo.-YX\rcrrrx-.f ncc rm'i 



WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEAEST has made 
the big leap that he has been threatening for 
sometime. 

Mr. Hearst, as a producer of good pictures, based 
largely upon the very valuable literary material at 
his command and nurtured under the golden influ- 
ence of the Hearst fortune, will be a very desirable 
acquisition to the trade. 

However, if the apprehension that has been widely 
voiced that the celebrated newspaper proprietor is 
looking forward to a film dictatorship is well- 
grounded, then the announcement of his new plans 
takes on quite a different significance. 



TAWDRY sensationalism and the cheap notoriety 
that is within the gift of the police courts has 
long since ceased to be fit subjects for capitalizing 
upon the screen. 

In this connection Mr. Carl Laemmle has made a 
commendable pronouncement. 

Mr. Laemmle in an interview printed elsewhere 
in this issue declares in unequivocal terms that ^he 
Universal Company will have none of this sort of 
thing. He referred particularly to a recent Chicago 
case of a young woman whose father stood trial for 
the murder of an antique gray beard who was charged 
with seducing the girl. 

The case had all the wholesome romance and in- 
spiring adventure that the few facts here enumerated 
would seem to indicate, yet the young woman was 
early accorded the favor of mention for screen honors. 

Mr. Laemmle has taken a creditable stand and it 
is so logical and consistent with the essential dignity 
of the motion picture, that we sincerely trust it will* 
be speedily followed by every reputable producer. 



GOLD brick film companies — those stock-selling 
propositions which are conceived in bad faith 
and destined from the start to a bad end — are rank 
menaces to the industry at large. They create an ill- 
feeling toward the business that constantly widens 
in scope. Every innocent investor caught becomes 
an assailant of the business, charging the whole in- 
dustry with dishonesty. It creates a situation in 
which it is practically impossible to obtain financial 
support from the general public for a motion picture 
enterprise committed to a reasonable and practicable 
prospectus. 

The Herald in an early issue will review in detail 
several of these wild-cat propositions, endeavoring to 
expose in plain view the individuals who have had a 
hand in this dirty business. 



THE European invasion of William Fox, accom- 
panied by his associates, Wintield E. Sheehan and 
Abraham Carlos, is typical of the initiative and en- 
terprise of the Fox organization. Mr. Fox goes abroad 
as a standard-bearer of the American-made film and 
whatever success he achieves is in reality a step 
toward insuring the supremacy of the American pro- 
ducer both in this country and elsewhere. May good 
luck attend him ! 



THE current legislative season has witnessed the 
introduction on a large scale of the first revenue 
bills hitting the motion picture industry. 

Although there are many of these bills aimed to 
collect tribute from the industry a great many more 
may be expected. With the elimination of the revenue 
incidental to the liquor business there will be a big 
deficiency in city, state and national treasuries. The 
motion picture will be called upon to contribute 
largely to meet this deficit. 

This brings home the necessity of serious con- 
sideration by the exhibitor of what should be his 
attitude, purely in a financial sense, in reference 
to impending prohibition. 

Another consideration is the fact that with liquor 
eliminated that great army of official busy-bodies 
who have been getting a livelihood out of campaign- 
ing against liquor cannot be expected to go to work: 
it may be expected that thousands of them will next 
busy themselves by annoying the film industry, a 
conspicuous target. 

sie • $ $ 

ELSEWHERE in this issue there are printed two 
stories that seem to indicate almost inevitable 
prosperity for the industry. One mentions that 
studio space is at a premium and the other recites the 
fact that everywhere there is a great demand for 
theatres. 

With fully seventy per cent of the people devoutly 
attached to motion pictures and with the rough seas 
of the past year safely weathered the immediate 
future looms up very encouragingly. 



AN indication of the trend of public opinion in 
reference to the Sunday opening of picture 
theatres may be seen in the attitude of various impor- 
tant daily newspapers throughout the country. In 
vigorous editorial expression these newspapers deplore 
the intolerance that is behind the movement to pre- 
vent the exhibition of pictures on Sunday. 

The example of these newspapers will he followed 
elsewhere. Let your local newspaper lead your light 
for Sunday pictures. 



15 




NEWS OF THE WEEK 

Motion Picture Theatre Values Boom as Pro- 
hibition Approaches 17 

World Company To Readjust Finances; Issues 
New Stock 17 

Nebraska Citizens Win Fight To Kill State 
Censorship 18 

Vitagraph Quits Program ; New Deal for The- 
atres 18 

New Jersey Lawmakers Have Drafted Another 
Censorship Bill 19 

Rival Exhibitors Figure in $25,000 Suit for 
Slander 20 

Picture Engineers to Hold Convention at Phila- 
delphia, Pa 20 

Scarcity of Studios Indicates Big Year Ahead 
for Industry 21 

Albert Capellani To Produce Screen Version of 
"Oh, Boy" 22 

William Randolph Hearst To Enter Feature and 
Spectacle Field 23 

Thomas J. Carrigan Is Given Title Role in Fox 
Feature "Checkers" 24 

Barbara Castleton To Be Leading Woman in 
Henry B. Warner Film 26 

Goldwyn Plea for Better Pictures Meets Ap- 
proval of Exhibitors 27 

Carl Laemmle Takes Positive Stand Against 
Starring Notorious Women 29 

Film Clearing House Is Preparing To Exploit 
Rothapfel Unit Program 30 

Hodkinson Company Is Distributor for Four 
Star Pictures 31 

Reviews 

"The World To Live In," Select C-D, five parts, 
with Alice Brady 33 

"Never Say Quit," Fox C-D, five parts, with 
George Walsh 33 

"The Blind Man's Eyes," Metro D, five parts, 
with Bert Lytell 33 

"Little Comrade," Paramount C-D, five parts, 
with Vivian Martin 33 

"Go Get 'Em Garringer," Pathe D, five parts, 
with Franklyn Farnum 33 

"It's A Bear," Triangle C, five parts, with Tay- 
lor Holmes 34 

"The Carter Case," Craig Kennedy serial, with 
Herbert Rawlinson and Margaret Marsh. ... 34 

"The Amazing Wife," Universal D, five parts, 
with Mary MacLaren , 34 



"The Probation Wife," Select D, five parts, with 

Norma Talmadge 34 

"The Lion and the Lamb," Exhibitors Mutual 

C-D, five parts, with Billie Rhodes.... 35 

"Good Gracious, Annabelle," Paramount C, five 

parts, with Billie Burke 35 

"Miss Dulcie From Dixie," Vitagraph D, five 

parts, with Gladys Leslie 35 

"Gambling in Souls," Fox D, five parts, with 

Madlaine Traverse 35 

"From Headquarters," Vitagraph D, five parts, 

with Anita Stewart 36 

"Three Men and A Girl," Paramount C-D, five 

parts, with Marguerite Clark 36 

Departments 

The Cutting Room 25 

Heraldgrams 37 

Exhibitors' Bureau 39, 40 

What The Picture Did For Me. . .43, 44, 45, 46, 47 

Canadian Film News 49, 50 

Chicago Trade Events 51, 52 

Calendar of Program Publications 53, 54, 55 

The Open Market 56, 57 

Advertisements 

Arrow Film Corporation 10 

Bluebird Exchange 3 

William T. Braun 58 

Central Theatre Supply Company 58 

Coburn Organ Company 58 

DeBerri Scenic Company 58 

First National Exhibitors Circuit 9 

Fox Film Corporation 4 

Fiat Laboratory 58 

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation 1 

Simeon Greiver Productions 13 

W. W. Hodkinson Corporation 2 

Holcomb & Hoke Mfg. Company 37 

J. Frank Hatch Enterprises, Inc 6 

Mickey Film Corporation 11 

Pathe Exchange, Inc 60 

Nicholas Power Company 14 

Robertson-Cole Company 8 

Westgate Hotel 52 

William Russel Productions 7 

T. L. Robinson & Company 58 

Select Pictures Corporation 5 

St. Mary-of-the-Woods 58 

Toggery Shop 58 



Volume VIII 



MARCH 29, 1919 



Number 14 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



World Company to 
Readjust Finances; 
Issues New Stock 
Directors Adopt Plan to Take 
Care of Future — Auth- 
orize $4,000,000 

Plans of the directors of the World 
Film Corporation for refinancing the 
company were disclosed this week. 

The following- statement was ad- 
dressed to stockholders and holders of 
voting trust certificates: 

The Board of Directors of the cor- 
poration have adopted a plan for the 
readjustment of the corporation's 
finances, which they believe will meet 
all necessary future requirements. 
This plan contemplates the authoriza- 
tion and issue of $1,000,000 par value of 
7 per cent Cumulative First Preferred 
Stock, and $3,000,000 par value of 7 
per cent Non-Cumulative Second Pre- 
ferred Stock, shares to be of the par 
value of $5 each, with the right to each 
voting trust certificate holder to sub- 
scribe for the same on the following 
basis : 

Upon deposit of outstanding voting 
trust certificates duly assigned in 
blank, and payment of 40 cents per 
share represented thereby, each de- 
positor of one share shall be entitled 
to receive, when the plan shall have 
been declared operative and the new 
stock ready for delivery, First Pre- 
ferred Stock to a par value of 80 cents, 
and Second Preferred Stock to a par 
value of $2.50. 

It has been known to the trade for 
some time that the officers and directors 
of the company were planning to reor- 
ganize the finances of the company. 

It has been reported that the com- 
pany has greatly increased its volume 
of business during recent months and 
that its position has been considerably 
strengthened. 



Clause on Home Rule 

Stricken From Bill 

(.Special to the Herald) 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., Mar. 18.— By 
a vote of 21 to 17 the senate today elim- 
inated an amendment to the Buck Mo- 
tion Picture Censorship bill which gave 
Chicago what amounted to "home rule" 
relating to control of motion pictures. 

The motion to strike out the amend- 
ment was made by Senator Effington of 
Streator. 

The bill as amended was advanced to 
third reading. 



Frank A. Tichenor Quits 

General Film Company 

Frank A. Tichenor, for the last sev- 
enteen months vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of General Film Company, 
announces his resignation from that 
company. 

Mr. Tichenor was elected by the di- 
rectors to manage this pioneer distrib- 
uting company, and continued to do so, 
he states, long after his own business 
affairs suffered from his lack of time to 
give them. Mr. Tichenor, from now on, 
will devote himself entirely to the busi- 
ness which he conducted before going 
with General Film Company. 



Motion Picture Theatre Values 

Boom as Prohibition Approaches 

Liquor Men in Spirited Bidding for Playhouses — 
Building and Remodeling Going on 
Throughout Country 

One thousand more motion picture houses will be in operation in the 
United States in the fall of 1919 than were doing business in the fall of 1918. 

Of this number, nearly one half will be newly constructed theatres. The 
other half will be houses which a year ago were closed down — not on account 
of the influenza or some temporary local restriction — but apparently per- 
manently. 

Theatre Values Advance Steadily 

Theatre values throughout the country have been advancing steadily since 
January 1. Few playhouses are for sale, and those which are still offered are 
demanding considerably higher prices than a few weeks ago. 

Building activity promises to set a new high mark during the coming 
summer. In addition to the new structures to be erected, there are buildings 
being remodeled to meet the needs of exhibitors, who are demanding increased 
seating capacity. 



Information gathered by The Herald 
from its correspondents and other 
sources of information scattered over the 
country show that the theatre boom is 
not local in any sense of the word, but is 
national. 

At Newark, N. J., motion picture fans 
are pleased at the announcement Jacob 
Fabian of Paterson, owner of the Regent 
and Garden Theatres at Paterson, is to 
erect a million-dollar playhouse, which 
will seat 3,000 people and that high class 
motion pictures will be presented with 
a musical setting by a 50-piece orchestra. 

Same Story Told Everywhere 

Residents of Crockett, Calif., are just 
as thrilled with the news that two San 
Francisco men have leased Crolona hall 
there and will open a motion picture the- 
atre for the little town. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., is talking about the 
plans of the Elks Club to open a theatre 
there. Vicksburg, Miss., citizens are 
waiting expectantly for the opening of 
a new playhouse there. 

The same story is coming from the big 
cities and the little hamlets of every 
state in the country. 

Prohibition Aids Boom 

Real estate men explain the spirited 
bidding for desirable theatres and the 
seemingly unlimited supply of money be- 
ing put into new theatres as partially 
due to the approach of national prohibi- 
tion. 

In many of the larger cities, especially 
it has been found that scores of saloon- 
keepers and others in different angles of 
the liquor business are anxious to get 
into some other business before July 1, 
and scores have selected the motion pic- 
ture business as the most profitable un- 
dertaking. 

Indications are that theatre values will 
advance for some time to come, and the 
number of prospective buyers will in- 
crease steadily. 

Attendance Figures Raise 

It is no secret that attendance figures 
at theatres for the first three months of 
1919 far exceeded expectations. 

Big features, well advertised, have 

17 



gone over everywhere. Failures have 
been few and the few have been easily 
explained, the cause being unfavorable 
local conditions. 

One-day houses have been experiment- 
ing with three-day runs and have con- 
ducted them successfully. Three-day 
houses have successfully put over week 
runs. Week-run houses have stretched 
their successes in ten days, two weeks 
and in some instances as high as five and 
six weeks. 

Advanced Prices Accepted 

Exhibitors have been surprised at suc- 
cessfully advancing prices on special fea- 
tures. The 75-cent and dollar perform- 
ances are now almost as common as the 
25 and 50-cent performances were a few 
years ago. The nickel theatre has disap- 
peared. The dime theatre is now the ex- 
ception instead of the rule. 

^MininHiuiiinirniiiiiiiiiniMUHiiniiniiiniiuimmnnintrmnommiinumuniiiiiiiiBuiunuuiuiitunri 

| 'Herald' Is Best Paper, 

Exhibitor Declares § 

| To EXHIBITORS HERALD I 
AND MOTOGRAPHY: 
Enclosed please find postal § 
| money order for one dollar for I 
| which please send to my address j 
| your valuable publication for one j 
| year. 

| IN MY ESTIMATION EX- g 
| HIBITORS HERALD AND | 
| MOTOGRAPHY IS THE j 
I BEST FILM TRADE PAPER I 
| ON THE MARKET. It lias % 
| many valuable ideas and sugges- j 
| Hons which go to increase box- I 
| office receipts. 

I take great pleasure in join- 
| ing you through this subscription. 
Very truly yours, 
M. S. Smith, Jr.. 
| • 1277 Washington St.. 

Cape May City. N. J. 

"hi i i;i in iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii nimmniiinw 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Nebraska Citizens 
Win Fight to Kill 
State's Censorship 
Lincoln Flooded With Peti- 
tions and Resolutions 
Opposing Bill 

LINCOLN, NEB., Mar. 18.— The mo- 
tion picture censorship bill was effectu- 
ally killed today, when the legislature 
postponed consideration of it indefi- 
nitely. 

Hundreds of persons have signed pe- 
titions which recite the fact that the 
proposed bill will have the effect of de- 
priving small towns of practically all the 
healthy amusements they are now per- 
mitted to enjoy during the winter time. 

No Need for Censorship 

They deny that conditions exist which 
make censorship a necessity and they 
contend that the passage of a bill of this 
character would practically drive the 
small town exhibitors out of existence 
and this would have a depressing effect 
on business. 

Community clubs in the various towns 
are joining with the commercial clubs 
and with private groups of citizens in the 
protests. 

The Woman's Club of Alliance sent 
a communication to the house that it 
had signed an endorsement of the bill 
under an erroneous impression and 
begged that this endorsement be with- 
drawn. The governor was also apprised 
of their action by telegraph and was 
asked to withdraw the names of the 
members of the Alliance Woman's Club 
from the petition of endorsement. 

Representative Smith read a letter 
from 40 of his constituents asking for 
him to vote against the bill. 

Petitions Are Arriving 

Petitions of protest with over 200 
names were received from Bruning, 
while over 300 residents of Sargent reg- 
istered a vigorous kick against the pro- 
posed bill, stating it would leave their 
town colorless of amusement and that it 
would be a blow to the business of the 
community. The Alliance Business 
Men's Club sent in a numerously signed 
petition of protest, as did those of 
Spaulding. 



Minnesota Censorship 

Quashed in Senate 

(Special to the Herald) 

ST. PAUL, MINN.— There will be no 
state censorship of motion pictures in 
Minnesota for at least two years, as 
the senate has adopted a motion indefi- 
nitely postponing the consideration of 
Senator F. H. Peterson's bill, which 
would have created a censorship board. 
Senator F. E. Putnam of Faribault made 
the motion for the postponement. Sena- 
tor Peterson led the fight on his pro- 
posal, but the senate stood with Put- 
nam. 



NEW VOTERS LEAGUE 

FOR SUNDAY SHOWS 

The Soldiers and Sailors Voters' 
League of New York, Inc., has just been 
incorporated with John B. Golden as 
president. The papers were signed last 
week by Judge Bijur and forwarded to 
the secretary of state, who has since 
signed them. The league has 50,000 po- 
tential members and the first meeting 
was held at 1480 Broadway on Mon- 
day, March 17-. 

One of the featured planks of the new 
league is for Sunday moving pictures 
throughout the state, with a minimum of 
censorship. President Golden proposes 
to get in touch with William A. Brady, 
president of the N. A. M. P. I., with an 
idea of cooperating with the National 
Association, so that in case the legisla- 
ture fails to enact laws permitting Sun- 
day picture shows there will be a phys- 
ical force available on election day, 
which will insure the election of sena- 
tors and assemblymen who are favorably 
inclined toward Sunday amusements. 



New Theatre Planned 

(Special to the Herald) 
JERSEY CITY, N. J.— At the Five 
Corners junction a New York syndicate 
has purchased a site for a new moving 
picture theatre. The company contem- 
plates erecting a $500,000 theatre with a 
seating capacity of about 3,500. This is 
one of the busiest sections of Jersey 
City and is at a point where thousands 
oi transients change cars daily. 



Vita. Quits Program; 

New Deal for Theatres 
Old Company Forced Into 

New Booking Plan — Smith 
and Quinn on Road 

NEW YORK, March 17.— Vitagraph. 
Inc., has abandoned its fight to main- 
tain its program system. 

After having maintained for sometime 
a stubborn effort against the inroads 
upon its business of the open booking 
plan this company has finally decided 
to yield to the newer order of things. 

According to announcement Vitagraph 
intends to effect a rearrangement of 
existing contracts with exhibitors along 
the line of individual booking?. 

In this connection Albert E. Smith, 
president, and John M. Quinn, general 
manager, are making a hurried cross- 
country trip with a view of effecting the 
readjustments incidental to the new 
plan. 



N. Y. Film Men Elect 

Officers of New Club 

(Special to the Herald) 
NEW YORK. — At a regular meeting 
of the newly formed Motion Picture Club 
of America, Inc., held this week, the 
following officers were elected: John 
H. Hammell, of the General Film Com- 
pany, president; Joseph Klein, vice- 
president; George Schaefer, second vice- 
president: J. T. Connors, sergeant-at- 
arms; Samuel Eckman, treasurer. 




EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



House Peters Is Back 




A scene from "The Forfeit," produced by 
Sunset Pictures, Inc., and distributed 
by W, W. Hodkinson through 
Pathe. 



Gentry Films Is Suing 

Educational for $25,000 

NEW YORK.— The Gentry Film Cor-, 
poratipn has filed suit in the United 
States District Court against the Edu- 
cational Films Corporation of 729 Sev- 
enth avenue, to recover $25,000, alleging 
breach of contract in the manufacture 
of a feature motion picture entitled 
"The Key to Power." 

The State of West Virginia and sev- 
eral organizations of bituminous coal 
operators are interested in the suit by 
reason of the fact that they contributed 
largely to the fund for the manufacture 
of the picture, which was to have been 
of a propaganda character. 

The plaintiffs in the suit allege that 
the defendant corporation has failed in 
many ways to, live up to its contracts. 

F. P.-L. Stock Is Up 

J. K. Rice & Company, 36 Wall street. 
New York, stated to a representative of 
the Herald, Friday, March 14, that Fa- 
mous Players-Lasky stock was being 
dealt in rather briskly at from 52 to 55. 
This would seem to indicate that there 
is a slight upward trend to the Para- 
mount stock since the announcement of 
activities of William Randolph Hearst 
in that organization. 

Famous Players-Lasky directors have 
declared a dividend of $1.05 per share, 
payable April 1. 



Schaefer Quits General 

Fred Schaefer, known for the last two 
years as advertising and publicity direc- 
tor for General Film Company, has re- 
tired from the company to go into busi- 
ness for himself as a producer of edu- 
cational and industrial films. This step 
had been contemplated by him for some 
time. The form in which he will con- 
duct his new activities will be ready for 
announcement in a few dav. 



New Jersey Lawmakers Have 

Drafted Another Censorship Bill 

Assemblyman Greaves' Measure Asks for Ap- 
pointment of One Woman and Two Men 
—Salary, $2,500 a Year 



Dark clouds of censorship continue 
to gather in various parts of the coun- 
try. The latest is a bill introduced in 
New Jersey. This measure is sponsored 
by Democratic Assemblyman Erick C. 
Greaves of South Orange, and provides 
for one woman and two men to consti- 
tute a board to pass on all motion pic- 
tures exhibited in that state. 

The House Social Welfare Commit- 
tee now has the bill under advisement 
and it will probably be- reported out of 
committee this week when the Assembly 
and Senate will be asked to pass it, 
whence it will go to the governor for 
his signature. 

Resembles Other Bills 

As provided in similar measures in- 
troduced in New York, Illinois, Indiana, 
Michigan, and several other states, a 
handsome appropriation to work on will 
be asked. In the case of the bill intro- 
duced in New York, the head of the 
censor board would draw a salary of 
$7,500. The New Jersey bill is some- 
what more modest in this respect, as 
each reviewer only receives a salary of 
$2,500. 

In other respects, the bill now before 
the legislators in Trenton is much along 
the same lines of the Ohio, Pennsyl- 
vania, Kansas and Maryland measures. 
The board is to examine and censor all 
films to be exhibited in the state and 
no negative can be shown unless it bears 
the seal of the censor board. 

One Dollar a Reel 

The fee for examining a reel of film 
will be one dollar and a dollar will be 
charged for split-reel subjects. Every 
film exhibited must carry a trailer show- 
ing it has been passed by the board and 
must bear an approval number. The 
certificates issued for each film, accord-- 
ing to the bill, must show the title of 
the film and list the eliminations made 
by the censors. 

If the measure goes through, no films 
may be publicly exhibited in New Jer- 
sey after next September unless they 
have been approved by the board of 
censors and stamped and numbered with 
a five-foot trailer attached. 

Heavy Penalty Imposed 

A fine of not less than $25 nor more 
than $300, or imprisonment for hot less 
than thirty days nor more than one 
year, or both, will be imposed upon the 
person, firm or corporation exhibiting 
any film not so approved. The penalty 
also applies to the person or firm loan- 
ing, renting or leasing of pictures before 
they have been passed upon by the cen- 
sors. 

Only films of a "moral, educational, 
amusing or harmless nature and which 
are not sacrilegious, obscene or tend to 
debase or corrupt morals" are to be 
given a permit to be shown within the 
confines of the state. 

Old Bill Defeated 

A year ago a censorship bill was in- 
troduced in New Jersey by Assembly- 
man Emmer Roberts of Moorestown, 

19 



which was defeated. A large delegation 
of clergymen from all parts of the state 
for the passage of the measure, which 
was vigorously opposed by the exhib- 
itors of the state. The argument ad- 
vanced at that time was that official cen- 
sorship is bad in theory and worse in 
practice; that the very idea upon which 
it was based denied the fundamental 
truth that real growth and development 
must be free. It was also shown that 
there was a selfish interest back of it. 
The bill was defeated. 



Old Mutual Studio 

Sold to Hal Benedict 

Hal Benedict Studios, Inc., has pur- 
chased the motion picture plant formerly 
owned by the Exhibitors' Mutual Dis- 
tributing Corporation, located at Col- 
lege Point, L. I. 

George K. Hennings, president of the 
Benedict concern, makes the statement 
that he will produce a twelve-episode 
serial in his newly acquired plant, and 
will be able to take care of the needs of 
other producing concerns as well. The 
plant consists of two large floors of 
working space sufficient for the produc- 
tion of several features, with carpenter 
shops, wardrobe and prop rooms, labora- 
tories, etc. One of the unique features 
of the place is a complete kitchen and 
dining hall where lunches may be prop- 
erly prepared for working companies. 



Goldwyn Leases Offices 

Roy. Scherick, representing the Air 
Nitrate Corporation, has leased the 
eighth floor at 469 Fifth avenue, New 
York, to the Goldwyn Pictures Corpora- 
tion for executive offices for a term of 
ten years. The aggregate • amount of 
the lease is said to be $250,000. Edward 
J. Hogan represents the owners. It is 
understood that the Goldwyn Company 
will eventually take another floor in this 
building. 



Screencraft Signs Star 

The Screencraft Pictures Company 
has just secured a new star for the forth- 
coming picture and is about to start 
work on the first production at the Mir- 
ror studio in Brooklyn. The first pro- 
duction will be a six-reeler and of the 
same high order which characterized 
their initial productions. 



New Sales Corporation 

The Jester comedies featuring Twcdo 
Dan and produced by William Steiner 
have been secured for domestic distri- 
bution by the newly formed Territorial 
Sales Corporation, with headquarters at 
Itioo Broadway, New York. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Picture Engineers 
To Hold Convention 
At Philadelphia, Pa. 

Will G. Smith and Joe 
Moulton Prepare Stage 
For Gathering 

The Society of Motion Picture Engi- 
neers will hold its annual convention 
and banquet at the Hotel Adelphia, 
Philadelphia, April 14, 15 and 16. 

This society has for its purpose the 
improvement ir. all things pertaining to 
the mechanical branch of the industry 
and the uplift of the business in general. 
H. A. Campe is presiden.. 

The last meeting was held in Cleve- 
land last November and met with great 
success. If the energy and "pep" which 
are being put into this one count for 
anything, it ought to excel the last. 

Will C. Smith, the general manager 
of the Nicholas Power Company, Inc., 
is treasurer of the organization and 
chairman of the arrangement committee 
in association with Joe Moulton of the 
General Electric Company. 

They started the ball rolling last 
Monday, leaving on the 5 o'clock train 
for Philadelphia, reaching there at T. 
calling on four hotels, making final ar- 
rangements and catching a train for New 
York at West Philadelphia at 9:02, thus 
fixing up all details in two hours. 

Mr. Smith says the Hotel Adelphia is 
well equipped for their purposes. It is 
confidently expected that this conven- 
tion will be the most successful the so- 
ciety has enjoyed. 



Universal Family Reunion 

One of the biggest "family" reunions 
ever held in the Los Angeles film colony 
occurred last week at Universal City 
when the big Universal family got to- 
gether for the first time in over a year. 
The occasion for the big reunion was 
the arrival of President Carl Laemmle 
at the studios from New York. Harry 
Carey and Mildred Harris were the only 
members of the Universal family miss- 
ing. H. Carey was on a 5,000-mile trip 
through the West while Miss Harris 
was spending a brief vacation in New 
York. 



'Hmiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

j 'Worth Weight in Gold' 

Is Exhibitor's Tribute § 

| To EXHIBITORS HERALD j 
AND MOTOGRAPHY: 

The HERALD is worth its j 

| weight in gold for giving infor- j 

| mation on any picture. Every j 

| exhibitor should be a subscriber. | 

Very truly yours, j 

Stephen Arnott, j 
Bruceville, Ind. 

3 H 

^PiiiifmntMiiitiKiraniiiiitituiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiimtiitiiiJiiiiiiiiiiJiiitiiJiJiiitrriifitfuituuiimiiuiiiiimiHiunni^ 

Everett Dean Martin 

Heads Board of Review 

NEW YORK.— Everett Dean Martin, 
director of the Cooper Union forums, 
conducted under the auspices of the 
People's Institute of New York City, has 
just been elected chairman of the Na- 
tional Board of Review of Motion Pic- 
tures. Mr. Martin has been influential 
in developing the "little university" at 
Cooper Union, the underlying idea of 
which is to offer an opportunity for the 
masses of the people to thresh out moot 
questions of fundamental social signifi- 
cance. 

Mr. Martin sees in the wide range of 
questions raised by the motion picture 
drama the chance to further arouse the 
intellectual processes which so often lie 
dormant in the masses for sheer lack of 
stimuli. He believes that motion pic- 
tures frequently constitute the stimuli 
through which people may be moved to 
contribute as intellectual beings to the 
stream of thought of the world. 



Abramson in Chicago 

Ivan Abramson, president of the 
(iraphic Film Corporation, is registered 
at the Sherman Hotel, Chicago. Mr. 
Abramson is negotiating with several 
Chicago exchangemen for the exploita- 
tion of his latest feature, "The Echo of 
Youth." 



Rival Exhibitors 
Figure in $25,000 
Suit for Slander 

Ottawa Women Theatre 
Owners Carry Feud 
Into Court 

OTTAWA, ILL.— A remark supposed 
to have been casually dropped by Mrs. 
Mildred Taylor, whose theatre was de- 
stroyed by fire at La Salle, November 
20 last, in which she charged her com- 
petitor, Miss Olg'a Heilstedt, proprie- 
tress of the Marquette Theatre, with be- 
ing responsible for the conflagration, led 
to a $25,000 libel and slander suit filed 
in the circuit court. 

Mrs. Taylor was the owner of the Ma- 
jestic Theatre, which was left in ruins 
after the November fire. Origin of the 
blaze remained a mystery, it is said, and 
in her search -for some one to place 
blame upon, Mrs. Taylor is alleged to 
have charged Miss Heilstedt, her prin- 
cipal competitor in the motion picture 
business, with applying the torch. 

The remark out of which has grown 
Miss Heilstedt's claim is supposed to 
have been: 

"She (meaning Miss Heilstedt) is the 
one who burned the Majestic Theatre." 

When Miss Heilstedt heard of the 
allegation she consulted her lawyer and 
instructed him to begin suit in an at- 
tempt to collect balm for her injured 
reputation. 



Diggs Now Manager 

Harry P. Diggs. formerly director of 
publicity for Independent Sales corpora- 
tion, has been made business manager 
of Rothapfel Pictures Corporation. 



Exhibitor is Fined for 

Showing Uncensored Film 

BALTIMORE. MD.— For allowing a 
motion picture film to be shown with- 
out first having been censored by the 
Board of Motion-Picture Censors, Louis 
Bell, 821 North Broadway, manager of 
the Blue Mouse, was fined $25 and costs 
by Magistrate Dawkins at the Central 
Police Station. The film in question 
bears the title of the "Amazing Impos- 
tor" and, although bearing the stamp of 
approval, it was alleged, was never re- 
viewed by the board, according to 
Charles E. Harper, one of the members. 
Bell said he thought the seal was au- 
thentic. 



'MARIE, LTD.," ALICE BRADY'S NEXT SELECT PICTURE 






Miss Ilrndy, »n "Marie," fight* to protect her own good nnme and her mother's reputation in this engrossing metropolitan ro- 
mance. It Is said to give the Select star unusual opportunity to display her artistry. 

20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND M O T O G R A P H Y 



Charlie and Edna 




A Scene from the Essanay-Chaplin 
Comedy, "Police," Being Re- 
issued Through General 
Film Exchanges 



Virginia Pearson Able 

To Resume Work on Film 

Jack O'Brien will resume the direc- 
tion this week of the first of the series 
of pictures which will be published 
through Pathe, called "The Bishop's 
Emeralds," starring Virginia Pearson. 

Work on the picture was stopped for 
the time being because of an automobile 
accident to Miss Pearson, which re- 
sulted in her suffering slight bruises and 
a severe shock. The Southern favorite 
has, however, entirely recovered from 
the effect of both, and says she even 
feels good results from the enforced 
rest. 



Sells State Rights 

DETROIT, MICH.— James Keane 
has disposed of the Michigan rights to 
"The Spreading Evil" to the Penoyer 
Enterprises, who will exploit the feature 
throughout the state. Mr. Keane ex- 
pects to return to New York this week, 
having closed for the following terri- 
tory: Illinois, Indiana, Southern Wis- 
consin and Michigan. 



North Closes Big Deal 

Robert North of the Apollo Trading 
Company of the Longacre Theatre build- 
ing, has just returned from an extended 
business trip throughout the country. 
He reports many sales and the acquisi- 
tion of several large productions. Mr. 
North has just closed a deal on the en- 
tire foreign rights of Blanche Sweet's 
latest picture, "The Unpardonable Sin." 



Scarcity of Studios Indicates 

Big Year Ahead for Industry 

Independent Producers Seeking Plants to Put 
Plays in Work — Both East and West Coast 
Going at Top Speed 



Things are looking up in the industry. 
Never in its history have studios been 
in such demand. On both the east and 
west coast spirited bidding is taking 
place for the available producing plants 
by both independent and old line com- 
panies. 

The various studios at Fort Lee, New 
Rochelle, Long Island and those on 
Staten Island are in demand now that 
the distracting influence of war and war 
conditions are removed and it is freely 
predicted that the present year will be 
the biggest in point of output and money 
invested in the history of the game. 

Many Companies Return 

Last fall witnessed an exodus of di- 
rectors, players and officials from New 
York; anticipating a coal shortage and 
other inconveniences they decided to 
take time by the forelock and locate in 
California where there was plenty of 
sunshine and very little heat required. 
Now a great man}' of these have re- 
turned, the eastern location offering un- 
limited opportunities for securing New 
York stuff. Los Angeles street scenes 
never fooled anyone yet, even when la- 
beled "in New York." 

The early summer will, however, see 
a large number of companies engaged 
simultaneously in the making of new 
productions on the west coast. 

R. C. Cole, of the firm of Robertson- 
Cole, is now in Los Angeles looking 
over the plants of the National Film 
Corporation of America, making features 
starring Henry B. Walthall and Billie 
Rhodes, the B. B. Features, starring 
Bessie Barriscale. the Jesse Hampton 
plant, where William Desmond is work- 
ing and the Haworth Pictures Corpora- 
tion. 

Universal Active 

The presence' of Carl Laemmle and 
P. A. Powers of the Universal Film Mfg. 
Company in California is regarded as 
significant and an announcement is ex- 
pected soon of this company's additional 
activities. 

Jesse L. Lasky, first vice-president of 
the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, 
who recently returned to New York, 
states that both the eastern and western 
studios of that concern will soon be 
humming. 

Thomas H. Ince is now at work in his 
spacious and modern plant at Culver 
City, preparing a series of features star- 
ring Dorothy Dalton. Charles Ray and 
Enid Rennet, as well as several special 
features. 

Enlarge Studio 

The Goldwyn studios, both east and 
west, are working full time. Norma Tal- 
madge, the Select star, is preparing to 
take care of the increased demand for 
her screen plays by enlarging the New 



York plant and the Select companies on 
the west coast are not wasting a min- 
ute. 

The many independent producers in 
the field who are seeking studios to com- 
pete with the old line companies, spells 
the death of the program system. The 
prices for good material for photoplays 
has also jumped due to these same inde- 
pendents who are in the market for the 
best stories, as well as the best talent. 

Nor is the present activity confined to 
the United States. Canada has a 
well-organized producing company — -the 
Shipman-Curwood Company— which is 
preparing to turn out some big produc- 
tions for the Canadian Photoplays, Inc. 
Harry Aitkin, for some time connected 
with the original Mutual Company, and 
later with Triangle, is completing ar- 
rangements, it is said, to produce several 
features abroad. It is rumored John 
Emerson and Anita Loos are to prepare 
the scripts for this foreign company. 
Margaret Clayton, who entered upon her 
screen career as an Essanay star, has 
been engaged to appear in these French 
made films. 



Brady Quotes Wilson 
In Address Favoring 
Sunday Opening Bill 

ALBANY, N. Y. — Representatives of 
churches and Sunday observance socie- 
ties of the state were on hand in force 
at a hearing before a joint legislative 
committee on the Foley-Donohue bill to 
permit motion picture shows on Sunday. 

Only two representatives of the mo- 
tion picture industry appeared. Roscoe 
Mitchell, an attorney for the exhibitors 
of Buffalo and vicinity, and William A. 
Brady, a producer. Spokesmen for 
labor organizations, Health Commis- 
sioner Copeland of New York and others 
favored the bill, which would have each 
municipality determine by popular vote 
if the Sunday shows should be per- 
mitted. 

The Rev. O. R. Miller charged that 
the majority of films were objectionable 
on account of their "rottenness." In re- 
ply Mr. Brady said that while the op- 
ponents of the bill had laid stress on the 
commandment to keep Holy the Sabbath 
Day, they had overlooked the command- 
ment "Thou shalt not bear false witness 
against thy neighbor." 

He spoke of the assistance the motion 
pictures had been to the government in 
propaganda for Liberty loans and against 
anarchy, and he read a communication 
from President Wilson in which the 
President said: 

"You may be sure I shall value the 
support of the theatres and the motion 
pictures for the League of Nations as a 
very potent help." 



The Herald's Reviewing Service Is For The Exhibitor— The 
Producer "Knows His pictures Are Winners." 



21 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



HARRY KNAPP IS NEW 
CHAIRMAN OF CENSORS 
FOR PENNSYLVANIA 

(Special to the Herald) 

HARRIS BURG, PA— Governor Sproul 
has appointed Harry Knapp of Philadel- 
phia chairman of the state board of mo- 
tion picture censors, to succeed the late 
Frank R. Shattuck. The appointment 
has received the hearty endorsement of 
motion picture men throughout the state 
as it means that the ambition of J. Louis 
Breitinger, former chairman, is not to 
be realized. 

Breitinger's hope of reinstatement at 
the head of the Keystone state censor 
board rested on the chances of the meas- 
ure now pending before the legislature, 
which would repeal the present plan and 
substitute for it a scheme for the crea- 
tion of a bureau of amusements under 
a single head or commissioner to take 
over the censoring of films. 

Breitinger, it was popularly believed, 
had his eye on that commissionship, but 
the fact that Governor Sproul has now 
appointed a new head for the board of 
three censors is taken to mean the chief 
executive is in favor of retaining the 
present plan of censorship, otherwise 
the governor would have waited before 
filling Shattuck's place until he learned 
what was to be the fate of the Bureau 
of Amusements bill in the legislature. 

Harry Knapp, the new chairman, has 
been dramatic critic on the Philadel- 
phia Inquirer for twenty-seven years. 



Harry Carey on Tour 

Harry Carey, the Universal star, who 
arrived in Chicago on Monday, is mak- 
ing personal appearances at as many 
picture theatres as he can cover each 
evening. On Monday he talked to pa- 
trons at the Casino Theatre, at the 20th 
Century on Tuesday, and at the various 
Ascher houses on Wednesday. 



Exchange Man Indicted 

After Film Fire Probe 

PITTSBURGH, PA. — Ten indict- 
ments charging involuntary manslaughter 
were returned against Joseph Radonn, a 
film exchange employe, by the grand 
jury in connection wth the Sauer build- 
ing fire and explosion January 7, in 
which ten lives were lost. A true bill 
was returned in the case of each death. 

The information, made by Coroner 
Samuel C. Jamison, holds that the fire 
and explosion was caused by negligent 
and reckless use of lye in a watery solu- 
tion which generated sufficient heat to 
ignite the film. 



Hold Alleged Thief 

DAYTON. OHIO— Barnard King was 
bound over to the grand jury under $2,000 
bond when given a hearing in municipal 
court on a charge of burglarizing the 
cash drawer of the Elite Theatre, on 
Troy street. King entered a plea of not 
guilty. 



"Malefactor" Under Way 

"The Malefactor," John Barrymore's 
new Paramount picture adapted from E. 
Philipps Oppenheim's story, is well un- 
der way. The scenes are being taken in 
and near New York. Marcia Manon is 
playing opposite Mr. Barrymore. 



"Flu Hits Landlord 



E. A. Dodge, owner of the Hippo- 
drome theatre at Jerseyville, 111., re- 
fused to pay rent for the time he 
was closed owing to the influenza 
epidemic quarantine. Zed Reddish, 
the owner, brought suit, and the 
court decided Dodge was in the 
right. 



Universal May Move 

General Offices West 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF— That the 
Universal Film Manufacturing Company 
may remove its general offices to Los 
Angeles and make this the national and 
international point of distribution, was 
reported in film circles recently. 

The current report is given credence 
by the presence in Los Angeles of Presi- 
dent Carl Laemmle, Treasurer P. A. 
Powers, Joe Brandt, general manager of 
exchanges: P. D. Cochrane, manager of 
the poster department, and Tom Coch- 
rane, Oriental manager. It further is 
said a number of the other officials of 
the company shortly will be in Los An- 
geles. 




VIVIAN M. MOSES, advertising 
manager of the Select Pictures Cor- 
poration, is the responsible factor for 
the distinguished appeal of the ad- 
vertisements of the Select company 
which are widely acclaimed little 
masterpieces in idea and execution. 
Mr. Moses brought to his work as 
Select advertising manager a thor- 
ough knowledge of the intricacies of 
exploitation by type and half-tone, 
having been associated in an execu- 
tive capacity with several leading 
popular publications in New York 
and London. Mr. Moses is regarded 
Tuidely as a real expert in his par- 
ticular work and is, incidentally, one 
of the most popular men in his par- 
ticular branch of the industry. 

22 



Albert Capellani 
To Produce Screen 
Version of "Oh, Boy" 
Creighton Hale and June 
Caprice Will Co-Star in 
Picture 

"Oh, Boy!" the successful musical 
comedy, is to be produced as a motion 
picture by the Albert Capellani Produc- 
tions, Inc., and published by Pathe. 

Creighton Hale, who with June Ca- 
price is to co-star in the motion picture 
version, created the principal juvenile 
role in the stage production. 

Adolphe Osso, who negotiated the 
purchase of the motion picture rights 
to "Oh, Boy!" stated that the decision 
on the part of the company to produce 
that piece was due to the fact that the 
huge success of the stage production 
was attributed not only to the excellent 
music and staging of the play, but also 
to what is seldom the case with the mu- 
sical comedies — a real uproariously, 
funny story. 

"This important ingredient, coupled to 
the cumulative value of the enormous 
advertising both in the big cities and on 
the road, is bound to revert and be of 
tremendous assistance to the exhibitors 
in packing them in, when they play the 
motion picture," said Mr. Osso. 

"It is doubtful whether there is a per- 
son in this country who has not heard 
of 'Oh, Boy!' and who would not im- 
mediately identify it as the greatest 
comedy success in years. Although it 
was extensively presented as a stage 
piece, it is a fact that it always played 
to capacity business everywhere, and 
could have played on indefinitely, were 
the theatres available for much longer 
runs. Furthermore, 'Oh, Boy!' is 
uniquely and exceptionally suited for 
screen production and offers even greater 
opportunities to present the rapid-fire 
comedy than did the stage version." 

Sell Southern Rights 

To "The Law of Nature" 

W. E. Shallenberger, president of the 
Arrow Film Corporation, has sold the 
Delaware. Maryland, District of Colum- 
bia, Virginia, West Virginia, North and 
South Carolina, Georgia. Alabama, Flor- 
ida, Mississippi and Louisiana rights to 
David G. Fisher's "The Law of Nature" 
to Edmund K. Fox of Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Fox will have ten prints for use 
at once, and plans to exploit the feature 
as a road show with advance men and 
the necessary paraphernalia for attract- 
ing big crowds. The Ritchey Litho- 
graphing Company has secured the ad- 
vertising contract and already has in 
preparation a big line of paper. 



Richman Now Producer 

Charles Richman. formerly of Vita- 
graph. J. Searle Dawley, and C. A. Per- 
kins have formed Charles Richman, Inc., 
to produce pictures. Work will be 
started within a short time. 



L-Ko Comedy Titles 

"A Skate at Sea" and "A Movie Riot" 
have been selected as the L-Ko comedy 
published for April 2 and 9, through 
Universal exchanges. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



William Randolph Hearst to Enter 
Feature and Spectacle Production 

Famous Players-Lasky Corporation Selected as 
Distributor— Work Begins on Pictures 
Early in April 

William Randolph Hearst, owner of the Hearst newspapers and maga- 
zines, and president of the International Film Service company, who for 
some time has been producing news weeklies and animated cartoons, is to 
enter the feature picture and spectacle field at once. 

The Famous Players-Lasky Corporation is to act as his distributor. The 
Paragon Studios in New Jersey and a part of the Biograph Studios have 
been leased. Nine features and two spectacles are to be produced dur- 
ing the present year. 

Hearst's Decision Not Surprising 

The announcement came as a surprise to the trade only as to the 
selection of the Famous Players-Lasky as the distributors. It was gener- 
ally known for some time that Mr. Hearst was determined to enlarge his 
activities in motion pictures and was entertaining a number of propositions. 

The new product will be known as 
"Cosmopolitan Productions" and among 
the authors who will contribute are Rob- 
ert W. Chambers, Rupert Hughes, Peter 
B. Kyne, E. Phillips Oppenheim, Cosmo 
Hamilton, Willis J. Locke and others. 
Statement by C. F. Zittel 
In announcing the plans of the new 
organization, C. F. Zittel, vice-president 
and general manager of the International 
Film Service Company, Inc., said "Cos- 
mopolitan Productions will be produced 
by us and distributed through the Famous 
Players-Lasky Corporation. Next year 
and the year thereafter we will be pro- 
ducing twelve special features and prob- 
ably three spectacles. This year we will 
produce nine of the former and possibly 
two of the latter types of pictures. 

"Our arrangement with the Famous 
Players-Lasky Corporation covers a pe- 
riod of years. The first film will be "The 
Dark Star," adapted from Robert W. 
Chambers' story. We have leased the 
Paragon studio in New lersey for the 
taking of this film. Allan Dwan, recog- 
nized as one of the leaders in the produc- 
tion of film classics, will be director-in- 
chief. We will also lease the upper floor 
of the Biograph studio. The erection of 
permanent studios will be started in the 
near future. Beginning April 1, Robert 
Z. Leonard will join our staff as a direc- 
tor and will have charge of another big 
production as his pictorial debut in our 
service. Every artist appearing in our 
casts, every director and every scenario 
writer attached to our very large sys- 
tem will bring with him a wealth of 
experience and world-wide recognition. 

Indicates Surprise Soon 



will be run on a strictly business basis." 

In connection with the new arrange- 
ment, Adolph Zukor, president of the 
Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, 
said: "Personally, I am very much satis- 
fied to know that Mr. Hearst not only 
can publish the works of our most emi- 
nent authors, but also can put them into 
pictures. This meets a public demand. 
It makes possible the producing of pic- 
tures that could come only with the aid 
of Mr. Hearst. 

"Mr. Hearst's genius is supreme in 
many spheres. I know the public and 
trade will be delighted to know that this 
affiliation has been completed. I am con- 
fident that Mr. Hearst will produce pic- 
tures on a very elaborate scale to make 
them as big and as impressive as money 
and talent can make them." 

List of Stories Available 

Among the motion picture rights 
owned by the International Film Service 
and which are to be drawn from for 
production in the Cosmopolitan Produc- 
tions are: 

"The Dark Star," by Robert W. Cham- 
bers; "The Career of Katherine Bush," 
by Elinor Glyn; "The Twin Sisters," by 
Justice Miles Forman; "In the Dark," 



by Arthur Somers Roche; "The Door of 
Dread," by Arthur Stringer; "What 
Would You Have Done in Her Place," 
by Edith MacVane; "Jack London Short 
Stories"; "The Restless Sex," by Robert 
W. Chambers; "Miracle of Lo," by 
Cosmo Hamilton; "Kingdom of the 
Blind," by E. Phillips Oppenheim; "The 
Gray Hair," by Arthur S. Roche; "The 
Crimson Tide," bv Robert W. Chambers: 
"What Do You Think," by Adele Burle- 
son; "April Folly," by Cynthia Stock- 
ley; "The Juryman," by John Gals- 
worthy, and by the same author the fol- 
lowing: "The Apple Tree," "Beyond" 
and "Saint's Progress." 

Also included in this list are the fol- 
lowing Oppenheim works: "Mr. Blunt's 
Three Clients," "The First of the Fools," 
"The Singing Bird" and the "Uncertain 
Elements." 

Others to be filmed by the Cosmopoli- 
tan Productions are the following: 
"Checkmated," by Henry Leverage; 
"Thirst" and "Tinker Tailor," by I. A. R. 
Wylie; "Husbandry," by W. W. Jacobs: 
"The Passionate Pilgrim," by Samuel 
Merwin; "This Light Must Live," by 
Arthur Stringer, and "Penny of Top Hill 
Trail," by Belle K. Maniates, author of 
"Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley." 



Lee Back on Broadway 

Joe Lee has returned to New York 
from Detroit, where he arranged for the 
opening of "A Midnight Romance," 
which opens in Kunsky's Madison next 
week. The Stewart offices have been 
informed that the "Romance" did more 
business than "Virtuous Wives" at Tom 
Moore's Rialto, Washington. 



Arrow Go. Moves 

The Arrow Film Company is moving 
to new and larger quarters at 220 West 
42nd street, New York, on the fifth 
floor, the former offices of the Cosmo- 
fotofilm Company, where they will have 
a projecting room and more comodious 
offices. 



Publication for April 

"The Unknown Quantity," Vitagraph 
feature starring Corinne Griffith, is rap- 
idly nearing completion and will be pub- 
lished some time in April. 



"On June 1 one of the best directors 
in the United States will join us. I can- 
not mention his name at present as I 
do not wish to have his present duties 
invite complications. His name, how- 
ever, is a synonym for greatness in the 
realms of the shadow play. 

"The spectacles which we contemplate 
will set a new record in that phase of 
the industry. They will consist of from 
eipht to twelve reels. Our organization 
will be without a question the biggest 
thing in the motion picture business and 



The Zukor-Hearst Combination 

William Randolph Hearst is the biggest figure in the publishing business 
in the United States. 

• Adolph Zukor as head of the Famous Players-Lasky-Paramount-Artcraft 
group of film interests has been one of the most influential figures in the 
motion picture industry for some time. 

A co-operative agreement bringing these individuals in association in the 
film business is an important development. 

It has been generally accepted for some time that Mr. Hearst has been 
anxious to widen the scope of his motion picture activities; consequently, the 
new alignment with the Famous Players-Lasky organization does not come 
as a distinct surprise. 

Mr. Hearst's activities in the film business up to the present time have 
been characterized with a greater quantity of failure than of success. But 
as Mr. Hearst's reputation proves that he has never resigned himself to defeat 
in any proposition that he has ever undertaken it may be expected that he will 
make a supreme effort to force into popularity the forthcoming "Cosmopolitan 
Productions." 



23 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

A NEW GRIFFITH-ARTCRAFT PRODUCTION 





Thomas J. Carrigan Is Given Title 

Role in Fox Feature, "Checkers" 

Veteran Film Actor Returns to Screen to Take 
Lead in Picturization of Stage Success 



Thomas J. Carrigan, one of the vet- 
eran film actors who for several years 
has been appearing on the stage, has 
been selected to play the title role in 
William Fox's "Checkers," which is be- 
ing produced from the stage success 
script by Richard Stanton. 

The picture is being filmed at the 
Metro studios. As soon as companies 
now using two of the William Fox stu- 
dios in Fort Lee have finished their work 
Director Stanton will take over these two 
studios for the photographing of a num- 
ber of unusually large sets. Some of the 
exterior scenes will be taken in the South, 
and the big race track scene, showing 
Checkers driving his horse to victory, 
will be photographed at one of the South- 
ern race tracks. 

Carrigan Well Equipped 

Mr. Carrigan is well equipped for the 
role of Checkers. He started in the mo- 
tion picture profession when it was in 
its infancy. He was one of the first film 
actors to go to California and for some 
time was starred in one and two-reel 
Western pictures. He was the star of 
the first multiple reel feature, "Cinder- 
ella," and also played in the -first serial 
picture, "The Man in the Street." 

After that he left motion pictures and 
toured South America, playing leads in 
a stock company. Then followed a sea- 
son in vaudeville with Mabel Talliaferro 
and two seasons with Edith Wynne 
Mathison in "The Deadlock" and under 
David Belasco's direction in "The Girl of 
the Golden West." He played the lead 
in the farce "Going Some" at the Re- 
public Theatre, and then played the lead 
with Lew Fields in "The High Cost of 
Loving." 

He was in Germany when the war 
started. Returning to this country, he 
was co-starred with Mary Miles Minter. 
Later he played important roles in the 
Castle Square Theatre at Boston, the 
Baker Stock Company in Portland, Ore., 
the College Theatre Company in Chi- 



cago, and the Suburban Garden Com- 
pany in St. Louis. 

Last season he played the lead in 
"Mother Carey's Chickens" at the Cort 
Theatre, and also played the lead in "The 
Copperhead," supporting Lionel Barry- 
more. 

Enlists in the Navy 

Following this engagement he enlisted 
in the Navy and was assigned to a trans- 
port. He made five trips across the 
ocean, having charge of entertainments 
for soldiers and sailors aboard the Zea- 
landia. He was at a naval training sta- 
tion, studying for a commission, when 
the armistice was signed. 

Others in the cast of "Checkers" are 
Jean Acker, Evelyn Cassidy, Robert El- 
liott and Bert Marbury. 



Forty- Six Theatres 

Added for Kinograms 

World Pictures announce that begin- 
ning next week forty-six more theatres 
will screen Kinograms. The experience 
of the World with Kinograms discloses 
that the World has, in less time than in 
any other news weekly, placed this, news 
reel in a maximum number of houses. 
Kinograms. in its short existence, has 
scored a number of news beats, the most 
important of which was the return of 
President Wilson from France. 



Six On Keeney String 

Frank Keeney's new theatre, the 
"Keeney Theatre" of Kingston, N. Y., 
opened last Friday to a capacity house. 
Another of Mr. Keeney's theatre enter- 
prises, the "Keeney Theatre" of Will- 
iamsport, Pa., will be open to the public 
within about three weeks. All Mr. 
Keeney's theatres are over one thousand 
seating capacity. This makes the sixth 
in Mr. Keeney's string. 



New Kerrigan Picture 

The W. W. Hodkinson Corporation 
announces that March 24th is the date 
set for the publication of "The End of 
the Game," J. Warren Kerrigan's next 
picture for Jesse D. Hampton Produc- 
tions. This story by George Elwood 
Jenks is a western. 



Write Salisbury Story 

Stuart Paton and John B. Clymer have 
collaborated in writing the story for 
Monroe Salisbury's next Universal Spe- 
cial Attraction, "The Great White Dark- 
ness." 



One Man Who Will 
Not Forget — 

Charles Simone, who is in 
charge of the General Film Com- 
pany's Albany, N. Y. ( office, is one 
of the men who has not yet for- 
gotten the Hun. The following is 
an extract from a letter to the 
Herald: 

"I am justly proud of the good 
work done in France by my first- 
born, Corporal Peter C. E. Simone, 
Company L, 101st Infantry, 26th 
Division. He fought the Huns for 
four consecutive months, going 
over the top several times and 
cleaning up a bunch of machine 
nests. It was while leading his 
squad against the deadly fire of 
nine hidden guns that he fell 
frightfully wounded. For more 
than seven months he has been at 
a base hospital, Bordeaux, 
France. (He is still there) fight- 
ing a greater fight even than the 
one he waged against the Boches, 
until now he is believed to be out 
of danger. If all goes well, it will 
be many months before he will be 
able to detach himself from a bed 
of torture. At the best the boy, 
who had the strength of a giant, 
the agility of a tiger and the heart 
of a lion, will be a cripple for life. 
Ask me whether I am in favor of 
welcoming the Huns into the 
league of nations — the league of 
damnation is the only league for 
them." 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



THE CUTTING ROOM 

Editing the Excess Footage in the News and Publicity of the Week 
Down to a Few Reels That Tell the Story Quickly — and With a Punch 

By THE * REPORTER 



Constructive Publicity 
and Other Kinds 

QUITE SOME LONG DRAWN OUT 
argument Messrs. Hodkinson and Wil- 
liams have been having in the pages of 
one of our esteemed contemporaries. 
While I have no argument with the idea 
of airing one's views at length, I do think 
the debaters should concentrate on the 
focal point. In this case, Mr. McAdoo 
was the bone of contention — -at first — 
but the range has been widening steadily 
until the last letter is calmly headed 
"Mr. McAdoo, Chaos and Other Mat- 
ters." 

Personally, I would say that it is quite 
some territory to cover. 
But here's the point. In all these arti- 
cles neither Mr. Hodkinson nor Mr 
Williams have said anything that is 
really of constructive value. 
Beliefs have been stated and opinions 
aired, but the result has been simply 
publicity. 

The man in the street, as far as the in- 
dustry is concerned, is looking to such 
men as Williams and Hodkinson for 
Practical Help. Concrete material is 
what he wants and appreciates. 

The Importance 
of Reissues 

IN THE MAGAZINE SECTION OF 
the New York Times issue of March 
9th, there appeared an article of interest 
to the entire trade. It was headed "Lo 
the Movies Have Achieved a Revival." 
The first paragraph is quoted as follows: 
"Who called the movie the roughneck of 
arts? Let him stand and answer! Does 
a roughneck art have revivals? Does a 
roughneck art have vintage pictures? 
Does a roughneck art have repertory? - ' 
Th§ article continues to answer these 
questions by pointing out the complete 
success of the Chaplin reissues or reviv- 
als, as the Times calls them. And, by the 
way, it was our friend Kashin of Mont- 
real and New York who first pulled the 
Chaplin reissue idea and not Riesenfeld, 
who gets the credit in the Times. 
But the article in a reputable paper 
clearly shows that the public is taking 
kindly to the reissuing of old master 
pieces of the masters and this is of im- 
portance to many producers because it 
means an additional source of revenue 
that must not be sneezed at. And from 
the other side, it would seem as the 
Times states that the screen is hereby 
definitely established as one of the Arts. 



The Hearst-Paramount 
Deal 

THE NEWS OF THE HEARST-FA- 
mous Players combine announced this 
week was no news to many along the 
Rialto. The Reporter was informed a 
few months ago that our friends of the 
International were looking for some 
money to put over the filming of the 
Cosmopolitan stories. 

And then, Walter Irwin joined Para- 
mount, and well — use your own judg- 
ment. 

However, it's a big deal and some mighty 
big stories will be given to the screen as 
a result. 

By the way, the Big Picture, the Big 
Director idea, is getting boosted higher 
every day. 

Perhaps the United Artists were wise 
after all. 

The Power 

of Organization 

A SPLENDID EXAMPLE OF WHAT 
organizations in the industry can do has 
been effected by the exhibitors in Iowa 
who have defeated Sunday closing legis- 
lation in their state and the South Da- 
kota exhibitors who have triumphed over 
the adherents of Sunday Closing and the 
Censorship Bill. 

At the time of writing, it is not yet cer- 
tain whether Nebraska will be successful 
in killing the Censorship Bill, but cer- 
tainly this state deserves the success of 
its neighbors, as every effort was put 
forth to combat this impending menace. 
New York exhibitors have nothing on 
their Western brothers in the estimation 
of The Reporter. 

Here's wishing Nebraska success. 

The Potential Value of 
Educational Pictures 

IN ONE OF THESE PAGES WAS 
discussed an editorial that appeared in 
the Denver Post on the effect of Mormon 
Pictures on childish minds. 
As a corollary to this, the report made 
by Professor Ernest N. Burgess of the 
Chicago University that the three most 
important influences on children are the 
home, the school and the Picture Theatre 
is most important and interesting. 
If this report is accurate, and there is 
every reason to believe that it is, as 
Professor Burgess has an excellent rcpu 
tation, certainly film producers and oth- 



ers making film material of this nature 
should be very much encouraged. 
The writer personally knows of one 
educational company operating in New 
York State that has made a considerable 
success and a very large profit, so much 
so, I am informed, to enter upon a na- 
tional organization for the distribution 
of its material. The Community Motion 
Picture Service will undoubtedly do a 
big work in this line as soon as war 
activities have ceased. In fact, I am 
informed, this is their intention. With 
the combination of the Y. M. C. A. they 
will certainly be formidable competition 
for any individual concern to meet. 

Pathe Puts it 
Over 

THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 
organizing of Pathe into a feature organ 
ization is most interesting from more 
than one angle. The Reporter remem- 
bers and in fact was inclined to agree 
with the opinions which were expressed 
on the' matter a short twelve months ago 
that an organization selling short ma- 
terial could not successfully dispose of 
features demanding high prices and spe- 
cial exploitation. 

Pathe, however, has done just this very 
thing. As a matter of fact, I have been 
informed that they are able to bring back 
money from the field on productions as 
quick if not quicker than any other or- 
ganization. With the installation of this 
special feature department it would seem 
that this well-established old organiza- 
tion was entering on an era of very 
broad prosperity. 

It is interesting to note that in all the 
references made in regard to changes 
ets., that go on in the trade, Pathe's name 
is conspicuously absent. Perhaps it is 
the case of the hare and the tortoise. 

Will Lubin Come 
Back? 

THE REPORT THAT "POP" LUBIN 
is now in Los Angeles and expects to 
reenter the film business is certainly 
meat for thought. If Lubin does come 
back, the return of one of the old mas 
ters will doubtless be hailed with much 
enthusiasm and pleasure. The general 
opinion is, however, that if Mr. Lubin has 
just about one-tenth of the wealth of 
commonsense he is accredited with he 
will be content to rest on laurels already 
secured and leave the field to his younger 
and more active successors. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND M 



OTOGRAPHY 



OFF TO GIVE EUROPE THE O-O 




Snapshot taken just before 'William Fox, Winfleld R. Sheehan and Abraham Carlos 
sailed. Left to right — WiiiHeld It. Sheehan, Jack G. Leo, William Fox and James E. 
MacBride, chairman of the Executive Committee of the Fox Film Corporation. 

Barbara Castleton to Be Leading 

Woman in Henry B. Warner Films 



Barbara Castleton, one of the prettiest 
young actresses of the stage or screen, 
has been engaged as leading woman for 
Henry B. Warner, who has just arrived 
in California to begin production for 
Jesse D. Hampton, who will publish the 
Warner features through Exhibitors' 
Mutual. The selection of Miss Castleton 
to play opposite him was Warner's first 
official act after getting himself a home 
in Hollywood. 

Barbara Castleton is well known to 
motion picture enthusiasts, having ap- 
peared in a considerable number of fea- 
tures, including those on the World pro- 
gram. She had a leading role in "Par- 
entage" and other independent films. 
Miss Castleton is a native of Arkansas, 
but was educated in New York. She 
began her stage career in "It Pays to 
Advertise" and was accorded a promi- 
nent role in "Madame Sherry." She is 
an athletic young woman. This will be 
her first appearance in motion pictures 
produced by Jesse D. Hampton. 

"The Man Who Turned' White," which 
will reintroduce Warner, is the work of 
F. McGrew Willis, a Los Angeles author. 
It was picturized by George Elwood 
Jenks of the Hampton scenario staff. 
The locale is Soudan. 

Warner began work on his first pro- 
duction last Monday and is supported 
bv Robert McKim. who has played "bad 
man" in many of William S. Hart's pro- 
ductions, Walter Perry and Frank Lan- 
ning, who have been assistants for Wil- 
liam Desmond in a number of his star- 
ring vehicles, and J. Dwiggins, another 



of the Desmond troupe, who had the 
part of a Central American governor in 
"W hite-washed Walls." 



Cowling Returns to U. S. 
After Touring Two Years 

Herford Tyne Cowling, chief cine- 
matographer for Burton Holmes, has 
just returned to New York from a two 
years' trip in which he has been taking 
motion pictures in the Orient and the 
islands of the South Sea for the Para- 
mount-Burton Holmes Travelogues. He 
left New York February 2, 1917, accom- 
panied by Mr. Holmes, and since then 
has covered over 200,000 miles in his 
travels. 

piflHniiiiiraiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 

Soldier Seeks Place 

| Frank E. Maffioh, 218 North | 

| Main street, Rockford, 111., who f 

| served six months in the U. S. | 

| Army, found his former position I 

§ filled when he returned with an | 

| honorable discharge. He has been | 

| in the show business twelve years, | 

and assistant manager of a motion § 

| picture theatre for six years. Can § 

you find room for him? He is 33 | 

I years old. married, and a Univer- | 
| sity of Illinois man. 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitoniMiiiM 

26 



Victor Kremer Handling 

Shorty Hamilton Series 

Victor Kremer has repurchased the 
Shorty Hamilton stories of which he 
was the originator and which were sold 
about a year ago. He has established 
offices in the Tilden building, 105 West 
Fortieth street. His plans are to sell 
the first four pictures, "The Ranger," 
"Denny From Ireland." "The Pen Vul- 
ture," and "The Snail," and as soon as 
the territory is disposed of, to bring out 
another picture, as yet unnamed, which 
will be sold on state right basis. 

Headquarters will be located in Chi- 
cago, while the New York office will be 
used for publicity and supplies. Helen 
Santoro, formerly a special representa- 
tive of the "Hearts of the World" Com- 
pany, will be in charge of the publicity 
department, and all prints for films will 
be shipped by the Rothacker Film Manu- 
facturing Company. 



New Williams Picture 

"A Gentle -ian of Quality," a Vita- 
graph featuring Earle Williams, is 
ready. Katherine Adams, Mr. Williams' 
new leading lady, appears for the first 
time in his support. Others in the cast 
are Joyce Moore, James Carpenter, 
Robert Bolder, George Pierce and 
Ronald Byram. The picture was di- 
rected by James Young, and was made 
from the novel of the same title as the 
play by Frederic Van Rensselaer Dey. 



Hits at Sunday Theatre 

AUSTIN, TEX.— A bill by Senator 
Dean and others, which was reported 
favorably by the committee, provides 
that injunctions may be procured by the 
attorney general or county attorneys 
against picture shows which operate on 
Sunday, and that the attorney general 
may take such action in Travis county 
or in the county where the offense is 
committed. 



8,000 Soldiers See Film 

"Made in America" was shown Mon- 
day and Tuesday, March 3d and 4th, at 
Camp Meade, Md., to 8,000 officers and 
men. Four performances were given in 
the Liberty Theatre. Lieut. Arra Chaney, 
U. S. A., attached to Headquarters 
Fourth Development Battalion, was in 
charge of the screening. 



Health Films Coming 

The Public Health Films Corporation, 
located at 1493 Broadway, New York, is 
energetically preparing for its forthcom- 
ing releases, the nature of which have 
not as yet been revealed, but will un- 
doubtedly prove to be out of the ordi- 
nary, as the name would indicate. 



Shoot Exteriors in South 

Director John S. Robertson, Assistan 
Director Frank Walton. Cameraman 
Jacques Monteran and the members of 
the cast of "Come Out of the Kitchen." 
Marguerite Clark's new Paramount pic- 
ture, have gone to Pass Christian, Miss., 
where the work of filming the exteriors 
for the production has already com- 
menced." 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Goldwyn Plea for Better Pictures 
Meets Approval Among Exhibitors 

Leading Showmen Wire and Write Endorse- 
ment of Fewer and Higher Class Films 
During Coming Year 

Samuel Goldzvyn's prediction thai- fewer and better pictures are necessary 
to maintain the quality standard demanded by exhibitors and the public has 
resulted in many letters and telegrams of approval from prominent theatre 
owners in several territories. 

Mr. Goldzvyn departed last week for the Goldwyn studios in Culver City, 
Col. Before leaving, he made the following prediction: 

"Goldzvyn for its third season will have fewer pictures to offer exhibitors 
next year — and better pictures. 

"The fact is that at the rate at which exhibitors are going now they 
threaten to exhaust all the literary material in the world. Even with a thrice a 
week change of bill, they are consuming pictures that cost the producers at 
least $250,000 a zveck. This is not only zuastcful but impossible. 

"I prophesy that before long the other large companies zvill follozu suit. 
Where Goldzvyn has made a star series of eight pictures with a single star, we 
shall perhaps make only four. Next year I believe you are going to see big 
pictures that command attention running tzvo, three or even four zveeks in the 
larger cities of America instead of for one week as at present. The one-day 
houses zvill run their pictures for two or three days and so forth." 



Bernard Depkin, Jr., managing direc- 
tor of the Parkway Theatre Company's 
chain of houses in Baltimore, supports 
Mr. Goldwyn's contention in the follow- 
ing letter: "I hope Mr. Goldwyn's pre- 
diction will come true. We simply must 
have good stories and quality pictures 
and the over-production now going on 
is detrimental to the future welfare and 
progress of the industry. I, for one, 
know that Goldwyn will keep its qual- 
ity up and not sacrifice dramatic value 
for quantity production. More exploita- 
tion and better advertising will result in 
longer engagements and aid the industry 
in general. Count on me to support any 
plan that may materialize from Mr. Gold- 
wyn's prediction." 

Duluth Exhibitor Approves 

Henry N. Azine, the well known ex- 
hibitor of Duluth, Minn., wired Goldwyn 
that he is heartily in favor of fewer and 
better pictures. "Better pictures, better 



exploitation, longer runs will aid the ex- 
hibitor and the producer. I agree with 
Samuel Goldwyn." Mr. Azine is manag- 
ing director of the Rex Theatre and one 
of the most progressive showmen in the 
northwest. 

Harvey C. Horater, managing director 
of the big Alhambra Theatre, Toledo, 
Ohio, expressed his approval of fewer 
and better pictures in the following let- 
ter: "I have always contended that 
over-production is hindering the progress 
of the motion picture industry. Having 
implicit confidence in Goldwyn's efforts 
to provide exhibitors with quality pic- 
tures, I go on record now as standing 
by Samuel Goldwyn in anything he does, 
because I know his energies and re- 
sources are directed in the right way. 
I, personally, have proved that pictures 
can be given longer runs by extra pub- 
licity and exploitation. And if Goldwyn, 
for example, would give me six good 
stories and quality productions, I would 
prefer to have these six than nine pro- 
ductions of less dramatic value." 



Charles Branham, Detroit's distinctive 
showman, directing the destinies of the 
magnificent Majestic Theatre, believes 
.that Samuel Goldwyn's prophesy is 
bound to come true and that other lead- 
ing producing companies will follow 
suit. "I have always been in favor of 
quality pictures," writes Mr. Branham, 
"and the first step toward obtaining 
quality productions is to eliminate 
crowding. An exhibitor can run a pic- 
ture longer than customary if he adver- 
tises and exploits properly and this, as 
Mr. Goldwyn predicts, is exactly what 
is needed in the industry. I am sure the 
prophecy will come true and that other 
companies will follow the lead of Gold- 
wyn." 



New Foreign Buyers 

Apollo Trading Company, a newly or- 
ganized firm, announces that they are in 
the field for good special features to 
be distributed in the foreign market. 
Lawrence Weber is the president of this 
new outfit with Robert North, treasurer. 

The company's first acquisitions 
were "Life's Greatest Problem," by J. 
Stuart Blackton, and Frank Reicher's 
"Suspense*," with Mollie King 

Benjamin Hicks has sailed for Lon- 
don, where he is going to open the com- 
pany's London office. 



Zierler Is Honored 

Samuel Zierler, general sales manager 
of the Big U exchange, New York, was 
the guest of honor at a dinner given by 
members of the exchange sales depart- 
ment at Murray's, recently. Mr. Zierler 
celebrated his twenty-seventh birthday. 



LaFayette Film Scores 

"Lafayette We Come," the patriotic 
spectacle released by Affiliated Distribut- 
ors Corporation, is playing to big money 
in New England, according to a letter 
from the Ideal theatre at Roxbury, 
Mass. 



Edwards Directs Farnum 

J. Gordon Edwards, who staged "Cleo- 
patra", "Salome" and other big William 
Fox super-productions, has been ap- 
pointed as William Farnum's director. 



PATHE OFFICIALS HANDLING NEW SELLING PLAN 




Paul Brunet 
Vice-Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. 



Fred C. Quimby 
Director of Exchanges 



Tom North 
Feature Sales Manager 



W. S. Wessling 
Serial and Short Reel 
Sales Manager 



27 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□a 
a □ 

□ □ 

Changing a Ten Year Policy 

□ □ 

The story of how a Wisconsin theatre manager made the 
tenth birthday of his theatre the turning point in its career; the 
value of capitalizing a unique form of home talent; the trick 
Df making one production serve another, and of the value of 
making advertising tell something about the action or story in 
a picture, instead of expecting the public to feed its curiosity 
and interest on the brief reference to title, star and theatre, 
o □ 

□ □ 
□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ □□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 



IN a town of 30,000 inhabitants, count- 
ing grandmothers, babies and every- 
body, seven picture shows have hard 
sledding. It might be an appropriate 
time to quote the famous poem "We Are 
Seven," especially the line which remarks 
that several of us are dead. The Bijou 
might be one of those, but it isn't. It 
stands at the head of the list with its 
seating capacity of a meagre five hun- 
dred, counting the two chairs placed in 
the corner on a crowded night. 

The other day Harry Hall Burford, 
manager of the Bijou, counted up the 
years he had been in the theatre busi- 
ness in La Crosse, Wis., and found he 
needed all of his fingers and his two 
thumbs to accommodate the numbers. 
"Ten years with 500 seats at ten cents 
is a long time," he mused. "But just for 
an anniversary present I'll book a regu- 
lar picture and double my admission 
price. I am going to change the Bijou's 
policy and prices as a mile post." The 
next day a salesman for the First Na- 
tional Exhibitors' Circuit of Milwaukee 
called and found Harry H. still in the 
anniversary mood. In ten minutes he 
was signed up for the first Tarzan pic- 
ture, "Tarzan of the Apes." The price 
was higher than he had ever paid for 
a single show, and with the admission 
price doubled, it was a gamble whether 
those five hundred seats would all be 
filled with various sizes of La Crossians 
or whether he would enjoy Tarzan's an- 
tics alone! 

Confides Plan to Organist 

The first person he told of the "birth- 




Allx-r* Raj and Elinor Fair in a scene 
from their flrsi l'o\ production, 
"Married in II:inI<-" 



day present" was his organist. Most 
organists don't care much about the 
picture, and sort of follow the story 
along any old way for the first showing 
and then do but slightly better through 
the succeeding shows. But that is an- 
other point where the Bijou differs! The 
Bijou's organist has been an active mem- 
ber of the house force for seven years 
and promises to be there as long as the 
Bijou stands. He is a regular feature 
on the programs and people have grown 
accustomed to saying to their out-of- 
town guests, "Oh, my dear, you simply 
must go up to the Bijou with me and 
hear that blind organist play. He is 
simply wonderful!" That is the reason 
why the Bijou realizes his value. One 
blind player made a fortune for himself 
touring the country — La Crosse paid no 
attention to him when he came to their 
town — a genius of that sort makes his 
home in their midst! 

"Tarzan of the Apes" was heralded 
with such advertisements as La Crosse 
had never seen except for fire sales. The 
daily papers printed ads setting forth 
the fact that Tarzan slew lions and 
tigers with his bare hands right on the 
screen . before the astonished eyes of 
awe-stricken audiences. The manager 
said the stealthy panther was but a 
babe in his hands and wound up one 
particular paragraph by noting that all 
the terrible beasts of the jungle skulked 
away at his approach. Again he hinted 
that Tarzan was a Californian seven feet 
tall and then he hinted at the coming 
of the beautiful white girl! Then, as a 
master stroke, he said, "Don't miss the 
first of the Tarzan pictures. There is 
another one coming!" 

Birthday Was Big Event 

Burford was determined that his ad- 
vertising of the anniversary change in 
policy, price and character of attractions 
should get attention. The theatre's 
birthday was a big event for him and 
he wanted the town to feel equally in- 
terested. 

The picture arrived the day before it 
was / scheduled. With painstaking care 
it was run off on the screen for the blind 
organist. The story was told to him as 
it was unfolded, foot by foot on the 
screen. The subtitles were read to him. 
and, with the usual keen mentality of 
the blind, the organist memorized them, 
and timed all substitles and change of 
scenes. Then his rousing music was 
practiced to properly harmonize with 
the great scenes in "Tarzan of the Apes." 

The birthday of the Bijou found every- 
thing in readiness. The lobby of the 
Bijou was too small to admit of city 
ideas of decoration, but it was plas- 
tered with huge posters of the attrac- 
tion. Tarzan's huge figure and the 
petite form of Enid Markey were pic- 
tured many times with the ever-fascinat- 
ing pictures of the jungle in the back- 




VIOI.ET PALMER, 
Who will appear soon in the stellar role 
of a Burton George production. 
(Kirby & Smith.) 



ground, and over all was the announce- 
ment that the blind organist's concert 
would be a feature of the program. 

The first show opened at 1:30 with 
every one of the 500 seats occupied. It 
was an innovation in the show business 
of La Crosse, but before the four days 
had ended it had become a regular fea- 
ture — at the Bijou! The ten years rec- 
word was broken to bits! 

Follows Up His Success 

Later the "Romance of Tarzan" was 
booked. This time the previous exploits 
of the jungle-man were played up 
strongly. The majority of the photo- 
graphs used in the advertising campaign 
showed him in the jungle attire that had 
become familiar to the patrons during 
the first show. Only one photograph 
showed him in modern attire, and that 
was the smashing scene where Tarzan 
puts a few of his tormentors out of the 
ring in a fashionable hotel, despite the 
embarrassment of his fiance. Again the 
lions and the tigers were mentioned, and 
a huge picture of Cantor, the elephant, 
bearing Tarzan and his sweetheart to 
safety, was the chief poster display. For 
five days the records suffered a second 
smash. 

The Bijou became famous as a 500 
seat theatre that brings real pictures to 
La Crosse. "Virtuous Wives" will be 
used as a celebration that the Lenten 
season is over! Harry H. expects to 
bring out a celebration as frequently as 
he can find an excuse and for a person 
who has the ingenuity of H. H. it is 
expected that he will find them fre- 
quently. 



Salisbury as Immigrant 

Following a brief rest, Monroe Salis- 
bury will begin work on a new Universal 
production shortly, entitled "The Open 
Road," and written by Bernard McCon- 
ville. The story has an Italian setting 
and Mr. Salisbury is seen as an immi- 
grant who adopts Western ways quickly 
and makes things interesting for those 
who have mistreated him during his first 
days in the new country. 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Carl Laemmle Takes Positive Stand 
Against Starring Notorious Women 

Decision of Witness in Chicago Murder Trial to 
Enter "The Movies" Arouses Ire of 
Universal President 



Deserved criticism has been aimed at the 
motion picture industry from time to time 
for exploiting pe-ople whose only claim to 
prominence is the part they have played in 
a sensational criminal trial — too often an 
unsavory one. 

The principal witness and central figure 
in Chicago's latest murder trial was a nine- 
teen year old girl, worldly wise, who took 
the occasion of her father's crime to bask 
in the glare of publicity. Day after day, 
she posed for newspaper cameras and con- 
sented to interviews, apparently rejoicing in 
| the notice she attracted. The cat escaped 
from the bag just as the trial ended — the 
girl, confidently and triumphantly announc- 
ing she was "going in the movies." 

One producer at least will not welcome 
her, despite the columns of free advertising 
I she has been given in all parts of the coun- 
I try. He is Carl Laemmle, president of Uni- 
versal. He has taken a step in the right 
direction. His attitude is well expressed in 
the following interview-' 

By Carl Laemmle. 

(President of Universal) 

Recently a young woman in Chicago 
became suddenly conspicuous. Her 
father eventually came to trial for the 
murder of the young woman's middle- 
aged suitor. The newspapers, naturally, 
saw in the tragedy the sort of "human- 
interest" story which newspaper readers 
like to read, and naturally also, they 
made the most of their opportunity. 

This was well and good. No one ob- 
jects — least of all, I am sure, the young 
woman round whom the sordid details 
of the tragedy were gathered. A re- 
porter found the "heroine" and inter- 
viewed her. She supplied "copy" for a 
two-column, "illustrated" article. To 
this end, evidently, she needed no urg- 
ing. And one of the Chicago's leading 
newspapers published the interview. It 
gave it first-page position. It "double- 
leaded" the article. This paper, it hap- 
pens, is one of the greatest journals in 
the world. 

Universal Doesn't Want Her 

Again well and good. And again no 
one objects — certainly not I, for I found 
myself, willy-nilly, interested in the 
story. It held my attention. 

But I found throughout that article 
varied and various statements to the 
effect that this young woman "was go- 
ing into the movies." Perhaps she is. 
I am quite positive, however, that she 
is not "going into the movies" through 
the medium of the Universal. I am quite 
positive that she will not "go into the 
movies" by way of any self-respecting 
producing company. 

Personally, I would not insult the in- 
telligence of the millions of spectators 
who enjoy Universal productions by add- 
ing this young woman to the roster of 
Universal players. Notoriety is no 
recommendation to either the motion 
picture actress or the motion picture 



actor. Had this young woman, at the 
time of this tragedy, been a motion pic- 
ture actress, had she, indeed, occupied 
a stellar position, her value, because of 
this notoriety, would have decreased, 
over night, at least fifty per cent. I very 
much doubt whether she would, as a 
matter of fact, ever recover her prestige. 
Is An Insult to Industry 

It is unfair to the spectators of mo- 
tion pictures; it is unjust to the produc- 
ers of motion pictures; it is an insult to 
the self-respecting actors and actresses 
engaged in the making of motion pic- 
tures; it is, in a word, a reflection upon 
photoplaygoer, photoplay producer and 
photoplay exhibitor, upon the screen, 
upon the theatres and newspapers to 
permit this young woman to use their 
columns for the exploitation of her 
notoriety and to exploit this notoriety 
as a possible asset for preferment in 
the world of the motion picture. 

Nothing, in my opinion, is a greater 
drawback to actor or actress than 
notoriety. I believe in clean pictures and 
in nothing but clean pictures. And I be- 
lieve in making clean pictures with clean 
people. Notoriety cannot get a hearing 
in Universal studios. 



Credit to Director 

On Vitagraph's current list of publica- 
tions is "The Wishing-Ring Man," a 
Bessie Love feature based on the book 
of the same name by Margaret Wid- 
demer. The production was directed by 
David Smith, and is being generally 
credited as the best of his productions 
with Miss Love. 



"Virtuous Men" Is 
Ready for Showing; 
Exceeds Seven Reels 

"Virtuous Men," the first production 
of the S-L Pictures, starring E. K. Lin- 
coln and directed by Ralph Ince, is 
ready for presentation by its sponsors, 
Arthur H. Sawyer and Herbert Lubin. 
It was six months in the making and is 
more than seven reels in length. 

The picture cost over $150,000 to pro- 
duce. Five cameras were used to in- 
sure photographic perfection, thirty 
massive and unusual sets were con- 
structed for the production under the 
direction of Charles Chapman, five dis- 
tinct spectacular efforts costing thou- 
sands of dollars, mark the unfolding of 
the story, and over 10,000 supernumera- 
ries were used by Ralph Ince in several 
exterior scenes. 

The star role will be interpreted by 
E. K. Lincoln, supported by Clara Joel, 
Broadway favorite; Grace Darling, W. 
B. Mack, Robert W. Cummings, William 
Blonkhall, Edward Talbot, Irving 
Brooks, William Cohill, Danney Hayes, 
and others well known on stage and 
screen. Messrs. Sawyer and Lubin will 
present "Virtuous Men" in the near fu- 
ture on Broadway as a special screen 
entertainment. 



Publish Delayed Film 

"Toton," starring Olive Thomas, 
which was completed by Director Frank 
Borzage last fall, is to be presented as 
a Triangle special March 30. Francis 
McDonald, Norman Kerry and Jack 
Perrin are included in the cast. 



Macauley Photoplay Sold ? 

Rather persistent reports have it that 
"Whom the Gods Would Destroy," the 
Macauley special, will be taken over by 
First National. 



EVENING CROWDS AT RIALTO THEATRE, NEW YORK 



The Popular Playhouse n< -l^d Street and Si-v«-ntii Avenue Dre*i Large Crowd* \n Week 
With (he Putin- Production "Common Clay." (Insert) i»r. Huso Rieaenfeldi 

HaiuiKiiiK Dlreetor. 

29 




EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

"THE SPIRIT OF LAFAYETTE" IS AUTHENTIC IN SETTINGS 




Directed by James Vincent, this historical spectacle presents a vivid story of the incident of Lafayette helping America and the 
payment of the debt by the U. S. A. Earl Schenck, Violet de Hiccary, Marion Barney, It.. Id. Elliott, Paula Shay and 

Kittens Richert appear in the cast. 



Film Clearing House Is Preparing 
To Exploit Rothapfel Unit Progam 



With three successes on the Indepen- 
dent market, Frank Hall, head of the 
Film Clearing House, is preparing for 
the distribution of trie Rothapfel Unit 
Program, the production of which is al- 
ready well under way. 

Mr. Hall believes that in the Rothap- 
fel program, he has one of the biggest 
business getters offered to exhibitors in 
recent years. 

Enthusiastic Over Unit 

"People are not only going to be given 
what they might expect but novelties 
in program units that will rise far and 
above the expectancy of Mr. Rothapfel's 
most optimistic follower," said Air. Hall 
in outlining his plans in this connection. 
"Mr. Rothapfel and I have gotten to- 
gether on this matter and it's difficult 
to convey to the picture world just how 
important his acquisition to the produc- 
ing branch of the industry is. The ex- 
perience of years as one of the most 
successful exhibitors in America, the 
knowledge of one who has had to cater 
to the most critical audience in the 
world — New Yorkers — and the creative 
genius of one who has brought into be- 
ing two of the finest theatres in the 
world and who has brought all New 
York to his places of amusement be- 
cause he knew what they wanted in the 
way of picture entertainment — these are 
the qualities and Samuel L. Rothapfel 
is the man who is working on the Roth- 
apfel Unit Program that will be given 
to the public soon. 

"It marks the birth of something en- 
tirelv new to the exhibitor. He will 
not have to book his feature at one ex- 
change, his scenic at another, his news 
reel at another and his comedy at an- 
other — he will get served by Rothapfel 
Picture Corporation with his entire 
program and he will be served with 
features that he can present to any au- 
dience, in any house and at a profit to 
himself in money and his patrons in 
entertainment. 

Comedy Already Produced 

"The Rothapfel program has passed 
the talking stage — it's in preparation, 
the first factor of the unit having been 
started under the direction of Wally 
Van. It's a comedy and one that's going 
to be real comedy, full of real laughs 



and representing the Rothapfel comedy 
idea. The Rothapfel program is assured 
and if I am any judge, its success and 
that of the exhibitor is assured. 

"Independent Sales' product so far re- 
leased is meeting with every success. 
The 10-20-30 series is doing business far 
beyond anything that I had expected. 
The series was meant to make money 
for the exhibitor and it's doings so as 
our records and their records will show. 
After a series of the biggest exploita- 
tion campaigns ever inaugurated in the 
interest of any production, Harry Rapf's 
production of 'Wanted for Murder' is 
going big in every section of the coun- 
try where it is or has been playing. This 
statement can be verified by the way in 
which John H. Kunsky, Detroit ex- 
hibitor, packed them in to his Detroit 
houses last week, when he ran this 
feature. Our exploitation man was on 
the ground, Miss Lillian Hall a mem- 
ber of the cast made personal ap- 
pearances at the Kunsky houses and 
everything was done to cooperate with 
Mr. Kunsky to make his run of this 
feature a big success. 'Independent's' 
other feature 'A Romance of the Air' 
is reported doing big business. Taking 
everything into consideration, I am 
gratified with results that Independent 
Sales has accomplished and I expec* 
bigger things for 'Independent' and for 
the exhibitor." 



Independent Takes Kelley 

Joseph L. Kelley, for many years on 
the staff of the Motion Picture Nczvs, has 
resigned his post with this publication 
and has ioined the forces of the Inde- 
pendent Sales Corporation and Rothap- 
fel Pictures Corporation, as "Lieutenant 
of Publicity." 



Atkinson on Long Trip 

W. E. Atkinson, Metro's business 
manager, has started on a cross-country 
trip visiting all Metro exchanges. 



Colored People's Theatre 

CHARLESTON, S. C— A motion 
picture theatre exclusively for colored 
people is to be erected at Anderson this 
spring. 



Exhibitors Approve 
Change In Titling 
Talmadge Picture 

"Experimental Marriage" Is 
Believed to Improve 
Original Name 

Many letters from exhibitors in widely 
separated points are being received by 
Select Picture Corporation approving 
the change in name of Constance Tal- 
madge's Select Picture for March, in 
which she is presented by Lewis J. 
Selznick, from "Saturday to Monday" 
to "Experimental Marriage." 

As previously announced, Miss Tal- 
madge's March attraction, "Experi- 
mental Marriage," was changed from 
"Saturday to Monday" owing «to the 
opinion that obtained among exhibitors 
that the name "Saturday to Monday" 
might lead to confusion in the minds of 
the play-going public. It was feared 
that patrons would confuse the name of 
the attraction with the play dates at the 
theatre, and be led to believe that "Sat- 
urday to Monday" was playing from Sat- 
urday to Monday only. With the new 
title, "Experimental Marriage," this pos- 
sibility is eliminated. 

The name "Experimental Marriage" is 
said to be especially adapted to this at- 
traction, inasmuch as the theme of the 
play concerns an experimental marriage 
between Suzanne Ercol and Foxcroft 
Grey. Suzanne believes in suffrage and 
Foxcroft believes in nothing but Su- 
zanne. In fact, his love for her is so 
great that he agrees to her plan for 
experimenting with a week-end plan of 
matrimony, a marriage that will bind 
them to each other only between Satur- 
day and Monday of each week. 

The plan works fairly well the first 
time, but an incident arises which 
piques Suzanne's jealousy and the 
happy air castle of matrimonial freedom 
comes tumbling about her shoulders. It 
is said to be one of the most humorous 
stories Miss Talmadge has ever done. 



Decide Publication Date 

Pat'he has announced that the publica - 
tion date decided upon for Leonce Per- 
ret's production, "The Unknown Love." 
with Dolores Cassinelli and E. K. Lin- 
coln, is April 27. 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



IHodkinson Company 
Is Distributor for 
Four Star Pictures 

iSix to Be Produced Annually 
— First Film Nearing 
Completion 

Uncertainty as to the distribution 
mediums to be employed by. Four-Star 
i Pictures, comprising Augustus Thomas, 
dramatist; Leah Bird, star; George Irv- 
ing, director and Harry Raver, pro- 
| ducer, has been cleared away by the 
i company's announcement that the W. 
I W. Hodkinson corporation has secured 
I the American distribution and J. Frank 
I Brockliss, Inc., the foreign rights, cover- 
J ing the first year. The first production 
is an adaptation of the play by Augustus 
i Thomas "As a Man Thinks." 

The Four-Star will produce six pic- 
| tures each year, allowing two months 
I for the completion of each one. Par- 
! ticular emphasis will be given to the 
selection of supporting casts for Miss 
Baird. 

Arthur F. Beck, treasurer of the com- 
I pany, who conducted the negotiations 
for the distribution of Four-Star pic- 
tures, is highly optimistic over the pros- 
pects for the coming year. 

J. Frank Brockliss, Inc., has secured 
the entire foreign territory for the first 
year's output and is arranging to give 
■ these pictures a wide circulation. The 
only open territory remaining on Four- 
Star productions is the Dominion of 
: Canada. 

"As a Man Thinks," the first picture, 
is nearing the final stages of completion, 
after seven weeks of work at the Bio- 
graph studios where Four-Star pictures 
are made. 



F. Ray Hancock Moves 

F. R. Hancock has taken over the Co- 
lumbia Theatre, Grand Rapids, Mich., 
and renamed it the Temple. All busi- 
ness and correspondence is being han- 
dled there instead of Charlotte. 




fflSRFORD T. COWLING, 
Paramount-Barton Holmes photographer, 
who jiiNt returned <<> I alted States 
aft«-r globe trotting two years 
with a camera. 



Four New Goldwyn 
Pictures Are Being 
Rapidly Completed 
Moore, Kennedy, Marsh and 
Frederick at Work at 
Culver City 



N Stands for Norma 



And Norma Talmadge' s Clothes 
Are the Envy of Many Screen 
Celebrities — Scene From 
"Probation Wife" (Select) 



Four productions scheduled to follow 
the current successful trio of Goldwyn 
pictures — Mabel Normand in "Sis Hop- 
kins," Pauline Frederick in "The Woman 
on the Index" and Rex Beach's powerful 
story of Alaska, "The Brand" — are near- 
ing- completion. Tom Moore, Madge 
Kennedy, Mae Marsh and Pauline Fred- 
erick are the stars. 

"A Man and His Money" 

Under the direction of Harry Beau- 
mont, Tom Moore is finishing the last 
scenes of "A Man and His Money," from 
the popular novel by Frederic S. Isham. 
It is a satire embracing the adventures 
of a young man whom circumstances 
force into the ridiculous position of valet 
to a kennel of toy dogs owned by a rich 
woman. 

Madge Kennedy's newest production 
is from the pen of Hugo Ballin, Gold- 
wyn's art director. In "Daughter of 
Mine" Miss Kennedy is given oppor- 
tunities to prove that she is a dramatic 
actress as well as a comedienne, though 
the light comedy element is the main 
theme. An unusual feature of the pro- 
duction is that it gives the star and every 
member of the supporting company the 
chance to play two separate and distinct 
roles. 

Marsh in "Spotlight Sadie" 

Lewis Allen Browne is the author of 
Mae Marsh's new picture "Spotlight 
Sadie." It is directed by Laurence 
Trimble. Though the title suggests a 
story of the theatre, such is not alto- 
gether the case. It is a comedy-drama 
of everyday life, with the playhouse as 
a background, no conventional stage 
scenes being necessary for the develop- 
ment of the plot. 

The story of Pauline Frederick's sec- 
ond Goldwyn Picture also is from the 
pen of Cosmo Hamilton. Willard Mack 
prepared the screen version of the pro- 
duction, called "One Week of Life," 
which is under the direction of Hobart 
Henley, who directed her first Goldwyn 
vehicle. 



Fontenelle is Active 

The Fontenelle Feature Film Com- 
pany of Omaha, Neb., has arranged to 
distribute in Iowa and Nebraska the ten 
episode Gaumont serial, "The Hand of 
Vengeance"; the feature, "Satan on 
Earth"; the Rita Jolivet spectacle, "The 
Masque of Life," and the Gaumont 
News and Graphic weeklies. The Gau- 
mont serial is receiving heavy bookings. 



Lappen with Keeney 

F. A. Lappen, formerly with William 
L. Sherry and late of the First National, 
Sales Division, has just been appointed 
special representative for Frank Keeney 
Pictures Corporation. Mr. Lappen has 
had over ten years' picture experience 
and is looked upon as one of the most 
aggressive and capable booking repre- 
sentatives in the country. 

31 • 




Next Essanay-Chaplin 

To Be Issued March 29 

"Police" is the third of the Essanay- 
Chaplin quartet of revivified comedies 
to be issued through the George Klcine 
System. The release date is March 29, 
although there are a number of pre- 
runs in down town theatres of the larger 
cities for March 22. 

"The Bank," the second picture which 
is now playing in first-run houses 
throughout the country, is meeting with 
as great a success as "A Night in the 
Show," it is said. 

In "Police," Chaplin upon being re- 
leased from prison, is exhorted by a fake 
minister to walk the straight and narrow. 
Being hungry, Charlie fills himself up at 
a fruit stand. When he reaches for his 
one and only five-dollar bill he finds that 
the spurious parson has "frisked" him. 
This results in a battle with the fruit 
vender. 

Wandering along in a spirit of dejec- 
tion he is held up by a highwayman, 
who proves to be an old pal. They plan 
to rob a house, but when the young 
woman pleads with them not to disturb 
her mother, who is ill, Charlie has pity. 
Not so his pal, who gathers up every- 
thing in sight. Chaplin tries to prevent 
the theft, but the police arrive and cap- 
ture him, while the real burglar escapes. 
The woman saves Chaplin, however, by 
telling the police he is her husband. 



EXHIBITORS HERAL/D AND MOTOGRAPHY 



DIGEST OF PICTURES OF THE WEEK 



ii' I ''HE day of the international picture is at hand," 
[ remarked William Fox as he embarked for Europe 
last week, where he will establish producing plants 
in France and England. It is his belief that motion pic- 
tures will be one of the most important means employed 
in the bringing about of a new international feeling 
of brotherhood upon which will depend in great measure 
the success of the League of Nations. 

Certain it is that America today feels a greater curi- 
osity than ever before regarding its sister members of 
the great covenant. It is logical to assume that these 
nations are similarly affected. The fitness of the film 
to satisfy this curiosity is evident. The power for good 
or evil which it possesses is the next thing to be con- 
sidered. 

American manufacturers have in their hands an 
instrument that may be wielded to great profit, to them- 
selves and to the nation. Thought along this line is 
certainly to be strongly encouraged. 

"THE WOELD TO LIVE IN" (Select) is a very 
modern story presented with modern trappings and 
enacted in modern style by Alice Brady and a cast 
that satisfies amply. As productions of this star go, 
the present ranks high. 

"NEVER SAY QUIT" (Fox) seems to be the 
motto adopted by George Walsh, who, as "Tough Luck" 
Jones, the unluckiest man in the world, finds much 
to engage his athletic ability in what is labeled "a hand- 
made story." Subtitles designed to "get a laugh' suc- 
ceed in doing so and in aiding the picture over certain 
weak points to a general success. 

"THE BLIND MAN'S EYES," (Metro) Bert 
Lytell's lateset publication, is a mystery story that en- 
joyed a certain vogue between covers and. is well trans- 
ferred to the screen. The class for which the story was 
intended should relish the picturization, and it presents 
no mean appeal to the unfamiliar. 

"GO GET 'EM GAERINGEB," (Pathe) which 
is Franklyn Farnum's sobriquet in his latest play, is 
a hard-riding, gun-toting story of the West and its 
ways. It is the old West of rustlers, bandit gangs, cap- 
tured maidens and timely rescues, but it is done in good 
style and snappily. Helen Chadwick is co-starred and 
pleases. 

"IT'S A BEAR" (Triangle) brings Taylor Holmes 
to the light of the screen again. It is a play dependent 
almost wholly upon the personality of the star for its 
success. There is little action and few high lights, but 
the story is mildly interesting and the star makes the 
most of it. 

"THE CABTEE CASE" (Oliver). That is the 
name of the serial featuring Herbert Eawlinson and Mar- 
garet Marsh and based upon the Craig Kennedy stories 
which were so popular in magazine form. If the three epi- 
sodes viewed are fair examples the serial should be one 
of the finest that has ever been produced. It ought 
to convert to serial patronage many who now devote 
themselves to the five-reel feature only. 



"THE AMAZING WIFE" (Universal) affords 
Mary MacLaren a chance to do some real acting. That 
she rises to the opportunity and makes of her role a 
thing of realism and appeal is but one of the picture's 
good points. A modern plot, good arrangement and 
admirable technical finish complete the catalog of its 
virtues. 

"THE PEOBATION WIFE" (Select) with 
Norma Talmadge, is quite familiar as to basic theme 
but developed -in detail that gives it freshness. Norma 
Talmadge is her usual capable, engaging self, sur- 
rounded by a company that set off her work to good 
advantage. The composition should find a warm recep- 
tion in any locality. 

"THE LION AND THE LAMB" (Exhibitors 
Mutual) sounds just like what it is, the title of Billie 
Ehodes' Exhibitors Mutual publication. The admirers 
of Billie, and they are many, will like the picture. It 
is built for the star and fits. That is what the public 
will be most interested in knowing. 

"GOOD GEACIOUS, ANNABELLE," Para- 
mount) features Billie Burke, according to the litho- 
graphs, but presents that lady in combination with 
Herbert Eawlinson, than which union none could be 
better for picture purposes. The play is a comedy. A 
serious strain which runs through it threatens at times 
to pull it down but is overcome in time. A pleasant 
hour may be spent in witnessing the production. 

"MISS DULCIE FBOM DIXIE" (Vitagraph) 
may be used as an every-day program picture without 
seriously disappointing. Gladys Leslie is the featured 
player and does what there is to do with fair ability, 
but there is very little to do. The same is true of the 
rest of the cast. A familiar story, told in a familiar way. 

"GAMBLING IN SOULS" (Fox) gives Made- 
laine Traverse just the sort of work that she is fitted for. 
Heavy it is, and based upon the revenge motive, at all 
times a dangerous one, but capable presentation and 
even, steady development have made it interesting and 
worth while. 

"FBOM HEADQUAETEES," (Vitagraph Spe- 
cial) with Anita Stewart, seems to be an amplification 
of a story calling for about three reels. Addition of sub- 
titles and similar tactics have brought it to the five- 
reel length. Despite all of which it should please mod- 
erately in a majority of houses. It is clean, and Anita 
Stewart performs in her best manner. 

"THBEE MEN AND A GIEL" (Paramount) is 
a pretty little thing dependent chiefly upon the win- 
some charm of Marguerite Clark for its appeal. It is 
based upon "The Tree Bears," a play with a Broadway 
run to its credit, but lacks the advantage of the play's 
dialogue. A play, none the less, that will please Mar- 
guerite Clark's following, and that means practically 
everybody. 

"LITTLE COMEADE," (Paramount) featuring 
Vivian Martin, is at fault only in the tardiness of its 
publication. It was designed and executed, apparently, 
before the armistice was signed, and calculated to have 
the proper propaganda effect upon Americans. None the ' 
less, it is a clever bit of film fiction and may succeed 
despite this drawback. 



32 



Alice Brady in 

THE WORLD TO LIVE IN 

Five-part comedy-drama; Select. 
> Directed by Charles Maigne. 
Published in February. 

OPINION: Rather unusual in plot, 
.and of a sort that appeals to all be- 
cause of its distinct modernity, the pres- 
ent publication presents Alice Brady in 
the most becoming celluloid attire she 
has worn for a long time. There are 
comedy bits distributed throughout the 
play with a hand that was skilled in the 
•ways of picture construction. The back- 
grounds are typically Select, which is 
•equivalent to saying that they are luxu- 
rious without artificiality; beautiful 
without frailty. Support that is always 
•efficient gives the star assurance that is 
evident in her work. Back of the story, 
that of the girl who accepts attentions 
she knows are not wholly unselfish, but 
gives nothing in return, there is a moral 
as old as drama and told in a thou- 
sand previous pictures. But it is not by 
this that the picture will be judged. It 
is a realistic fac-simile of certain phases 
of present-day life, and that is what the 
public wants to see. 

SYNOPSIS: Rita Charles finds it dif- 
ficult to live and enjoy herself upon the 
twenty-five dollars which is her weekly 
wage as stenographer for one Oliverson, 
< so goes about of nights with Harrison 
Chalvey. a wealthy waster. Oliverson's 
I son is attracted to her and his father 
sends the girl on a month's vacation to 
break up the infatuation. Her heart's 
choice is Doctor Varian, a poor settle- 
ment worker. At Atlantic City she ac- 
| cepts the attentions of young Oliverson 
and narrowly escapes being named as 
corespondent in his wife's action for di- 
! vorce, a service which she did the latter 
! when in poorer circumstances being her 
| means of escape. Chalvery has followed 
her to Atlantic City, as has also Doctor 
Varian. The circumstances which bring 
her to a sober realization of affairs and 
lead to her choice of Varian as a life 
partner make up the big scenes of the 
play. 



George Walsh in 

NEVER SAY QUIT 

Five-part comedy-drama; Fox. 
Directed by Edward Dillon. 
Published March 16. 

OPINION: The first subtitle informs 
• spectators that the picture to follow is 
; to be strictly a "hand-made" affair, 
thereby putting them in just the frame 
j of mind necessary to the play's success. 

It is typically a George Walsh concoc- 
< tion, a mass of complications furnishing 
the star opportunities to display his 
| physical agility strung upon a story 
thread a little stronger than customary. 
These gymnastics afford a certain pleas- 
ant exhiliaration to the beholder, but the 
real appeal of the piece lies in the sub- 
titles, cunningly devised similes, meta- 
phors and puns which vary in quality 
from low comedy to brilliant wit. At 
the Alcazar, Chicago, a mid-day audi- 
•ence, seeking refuge from a chill, 
drizzling rain, consequently in no espe- 



cially humorous mood, laughed heartily 
several times during the play's exhibi- 
tion. In better circumstances the offer- 
ing should prove a genuine success. 

SYNOPSIS: "Tough Luck" Jones, 
born on the thirteenth of the month, 
with numerous circumstances of similar 
omen surrounding the event, is pos- 
sessed of a jinx which he seeks to over- 
come. Due to inherit a fortune, pro- 
viding he attends the funeral of the 
deceased, he is thrice delayed in attempt- 
ing to rescue ladies in distress who do 
not wish to be rescued, finally losing 
the fortune and shipping aboard a' sail- 
ing vessel fitted out by Colonel Latti- 
more to locate a lost treasure. Helen, 
Lattinlore's daughter, is also aboard and 
the two discover a mutual attraction. 
The captain of the ship attempts to 
force Lattimore to wireless a confed- 
erate a hundred thousand dollars, threat- 
ening his daughter's life as well as his 
own. Jones finally loses his "jinx," sum- 
mons a battleship cruising in adjacent 
waters, saves the girl and effects the cap- 
ture of the culprits. 



Bert Lytell in 

THE BLIND MAN'S EYES 

Five-part drama; Metro. 
Directed by John Ince. 
Published March 10. 

OPINION: The - novel from which 
the play is taken enjoyed a rather wide 
reading among the class devoted to the 
detective school of fiction. These will 
doubtless think well of the picturization 
of the story. The unfamiliar will see in 
it simply a mystery story with a unique 
twist and a capable cast to portray it. 
Much attention has been given to the 
upholding of suspense, with a result that 
is noteworthy in this regard. ' The un- 
relieved tension has an inclination, how- 
ever, to tire the spectator. Mechanical 
equipment of high grade and a cleverly 
evolved scenario make for logic and real- 
ism. Frank Currier, Naomi Childers and 
the star work well together. The pub- 
lished picturization is well qualified to 
give satisfaction to those who are in- 
terested in plays of the kind. 

SYNOPSIS: Hugh Overton, con- 
victed of a murder of which he is inno- 
cent, escapes and seeks Basil Santoine, 
a blind corporation lawyer of repute, 
whom he knows has papers that will 
prove his innocence. Latrone. the man 
he is supposed to have murdered, is in 
hiding to escape prosecution for misuse 
of the mails. His agents also seek pos- 
session of the papers. On a railroad 
train Santoine is assaulted by Latrone's 
agent and Overton, known as Eaton, is 
suspected. Santoine's recollection of 
Eaton's voice leads him to take Eaton 
into his home to await developments. 
Eaton falls in love with Harriet, San- 
toine's daughter, the blind man's eyes. 
Latrone comes in person to get the pa- 
pers from the safe, Eaton making the 
attempt the same night. Latrone is ac- 
cidentally shot and killed by his accom- 
plice. The papers are then read, Eaton's 
identity and innocence are established, 
and the ending is happy. 



Vivian Martin in 

LITTLE COMRADE 

Five-part comedy-drama; Paramount. 
Directed by Chester Withey. 
Published March 30. 

OPINION: If old Bill Hohenzollern 
could have been persuaded to hold out a 
year longer, "Little Comrade" would 
have made fine propaganda material for 
the "back to the farm" and "all must do 
our bit" movements. It was evidently 
made last fall, just prior to Bill's deci- 
sion to quit, and concerns a "mamma's 
boy" who didn't want to leave the old 
farm to become a soldier and a city- 
bred maiden who gave up dancing and 
social engagements to become a farmer- 
ette. It is a pleasing enough story and 
Vivian Martin and Niles Welch disport 
themselves creditably. If it doesn't go 
over the trouble must be laid at the door 
of ex-Kaiser Bill. The scenes of camp 
life, farm life and the comedy touches 
furnished by the farmerettes are well 
handled and convincingly done. 

SYNOPSIS: Genevieve Hale, pam- 
pered daughter of wealthy parents, de- 
cides to become a farmerette to help 
win the war. She arrives at the Hub- 
bard farm in her limousine and goes to 
work with a group of other girls. Bob 
Hubbard, youngest son of the farmer, 
falls in love with Genevieve, and when 
he enters a training camp the life be- 
comes so distasteful he commits a. w. 
o. 1. and returns home. Genevieve per- 
suades him to return to camp, but they 
are discovered together and the elder 
Hubbard sends the city girl away. Bob 
obtains leave of absence and goes home 
to explain matters to his father and the 
girl's name is cleared in the eyes of the 
farmer and farmerettes. Bob becomes a 
good soldier and determines to marry 
Genevieve when the war is over. 



Franklyn Farnum in 

GO GET 'EM GARRINGER 

Five Part Drama; Pathe. 
Directed by John Clymer. 
Published March 23. 

OPINION: Whether or not he is 
guilty of concious imitation, it is not 
to be denied that the person coming in 
after the characters and players have 
been announced will be more than likely 
to mistake the star for Douglas Fair- 
banks. Which may or may not be a 
point in favor of the picture but is cer- 
tainly a thing worthy of mention. The 
play, as the title suggests, is a western 
melodrama with more attention given 
to the procuring of continuous and 
highly animated action than to the finer 
shadings of characterization and acting. 
There are bad men in plenty, a bandit 
gang unusual enough to hold interest, 
riding, shooting, abductions and res- 
cues galore, all the cogs and gears 
that go into the make-up of the stan- 
dard western thriller. But the thing is 
well done in every department. There 
is every reason to believe that audiences 
which care for the style of which this 
is representative will find in it the sort 
of amusement which thev desire. 

SYNOPSIS Go Get *Em Garringer. 
famous for his skill with the horse and 



33 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



gun, is called upon when the Triple Arrow 
gang has terrorized a certain western 
community to the point of submission. 
Shag, the leader of the gang, takes a 
fancy to a girl who lives alone with her 
aged father, stating that he intends 
to win her whether she will or no. His 
lieutenant offers rescue in the form of 
matrimony, supposedly a subterfuge but 
really legal. The girl accepts, learning 
her fate too late. Garringer, whom she 
really loves, fights with the gang and is 
pursued to her cabin. She hides him 
and holds the gang at bay while help 
comes from a near-by town. In the 
pistol duel that follows, Shag and his 
aide are killed and the gang despersed, 
leaving the road to happiness open to 
Garringer and his bride-to-be. 



Taylor Holmes in 

IT'S A BEAR 

Five Part Comedy; Triangle. 
Directed by Lawrence Windon. 
Published March 16. 

OPINION: Taylor Holmes' personal- 
ity, the personality that made such a 
success of "A Pair of Sixes," is very 
much in evidence throughout this, his 
first Triangle publication. It is that 
which carries the play to a rather suc- 
cessful conclusion. There is not a great 
deal of action in the piece, and there is 
little in the way of plot to hold the in- 
terest. It is simply, a case of judging 
the value of the production by the popu- 
larity of the star. Those who like his 
work will overlook the weak spots in 
the picture. Those who pass judgment 
upon the photoplay solely upon its mer- 
its as such will care less for it. There 
is nothing in it to displease, but neither 
is there anvthing to create a furore. 

SYNOPSIS: Orlando Winthrop, wealthy 
son of a ranch owner living in the East, 
gives up his study of bugs to go west 
and straighten out the affairs of his 
father's ranch. Cogney, foreman of the 
ranch, a man without morals or honor, 
plots to bring about the downfall of the 
newcomer. The clothes Orlando wears 
and the general carriage of the man at 
first elicit much laughter, Cogney de- 
ciding to let matters take their course, 
believing he will leave the west of his 
own accord. But Orlando plays poker, 
drinks whiskey and rides bucking 
bronchos so well that he gains the re- 
spect and allegiance of the rough west- 
erners. He wins the girl, foils the vil- 
lain and proves a real hero all in good 
time. 



H. Rawlinson and Margaret Marsh in 

THE CARTER CASE 

Craig Kennedy Serial; Oliver Films, Inc. 
Directed by Donald Mackenzie. 
Published March 17. 

OPINION •' Serials are serials and there 
are certain fast rules, which cannot be 
broken, i. e., the hero and heroine must 
be in a hair raising plight at the end of 
each eoisode. But aside from this and 
the other necessaries, the Craig Ken- 
nedy serial is a welcome departure from 
the usual run of installment pictures and 
should make many new friends for this 
form of entertainment. 

Herbert Rawlinson and Margaret 
Marsh were happy choices for the lead- 
ing roles and are given excellent sup- 
port. The settings are elaborate. 

The difference between this and other 



serials is the manner chosen by the mys- 
terious villain to kill the hero and hero- 
ine. Instead of burning down a house, 
throwing them in a lake, resorting to 
dynamite, or other rough methods, the 
villain attempts novel and scientific 
means of gaining his ends. 

The thrills are -new ones. The mys- 
teries are deeper than usual. The escapes 
are surprising ones. Dyed-in-the-wool 
serial fans are going to receive it en- 
thusiastically and many, who in the past 
have turned up their nose at serials, are 
going to be found in the picture thea- 
ters when the installments are shown. 

SYNOPSIS: Margaret Marsh takes the 
part of Anita Carter, daughter of the 
owner of a large chemical plant, the 
secret formulae of which is being stolen 
and sent to foreign competitors. Her 
father has a mysterious past and in con- 
stant fear of death has a secret room at 
the top of his home, where he thinks he 
is secure. When his daughter learris that 
her father is receiving death threats, she 
seeks the aid of Craig Kennedy (Her- 
bert Rawlinson), a scientific detective. 
The mysterious villain enters the secret 
room by aeroplane, however, and kills 
her father before Kennedy reaches the 
house. Miss Carter and Kennedy are 
then set upon by a gang of ruffians and 
are roped to the aeroplane, which starts 
up to pull them to their death as the 
first episode ends. 

Kennedy, by tying the rope around a 
pillar, saves them. Miss Carter is then 
locked in a vacuum drying cabinet and 
Kennedy bound hand and foot in the 
second episode. Kennedy releases him- 
self by a spectacular trick and manages 
to save Miss Carter from suffocation by 
placing a chemical solution on the cab- 
inet, which burns a hole in the steel roof 
and lets in air. Anticipating the return 
of the villains, Kennedy sends Miss Car- 
ter to the cellar and hides in a clock to 
trap the gang. The four ruffians are 
down cellar and set upon Miss Carter. 
The aeroplane villain enters and shoots 
three bullets into the clock. This con- 
cludes episode three. 



Mary MacLaren in 

THE AMAZING WIFE 

Five-part drama; Universal. 
Directed by Ida May Park. 
Published in April. 

OPINION: Mary MacLaren has in 
this production one of the best roles 
she has been given to date. There is 
opportunity in almost every scene for 
the display of real ability and she meas- 
ures up to the demand in each instance. 
Frank Mayo, with a part almost equally 
exacting, also performs capably and in- 
terestingly. The team work of the two 
is admirable. The story is based upon 
an idea which should make it of general 
appeal. Everybody in the country has 
heard of at least one case of the woman 
who declared herself the widow of the 
hero killed in action, and the situation 
thus brought about is one that permits 
of pleasant speculation. It has a fresh- 
ness not an attribute of the stereotvped 
photoplay plots which litter the release 
schedule of the average week. It has 
been done in better than average style 
and shows the evidences of thoughtful 
planning and painstaking execution 
throughout. It is a step upward for the 
star. 

SYNOPSIS: Lucile Ashton, widowed 
On her wedding night through the 
death of a husband married to provide 



herself with money tfc buy her mother] 
medicine, turns back from the brink on 
suicide to pose as the wife of another 
John Ashton of wealthy parentage, who ! 
is supposed to be killed in France. Her 
plan succeeds and she is happy in thd 
love of the elder Ashtons, until the un- 
expected return of John, whose death 
was falsely reported. John is quick to 
grasp the situation, but, after hearing her 
story, carries out the deception. Lucile 
has become a close friend of John's 
cousin, a lame but unconscientious club 
man, who has secretly learned her iden- 
tity. He lures her to a roadhouse and] 
attempts familarities. John's attempt to 
protect her leads to a fight between the 
men and the subsequent solemnization 
of their wedding. 



Norma Talmadge in 

THE PROBATION WIFE 

Five Part Drama; Select. 
Directed by Sydney A. Franklin. 
Published in March. 

OPINION: Though told as a story 
within a story, a device which always 
operates to the destruction of suspense, 
the excellent telling the tale has been 
given and the manner in which it has 
been builded gives it entertaining power 
of unusual quality. As the orohan strug- 
gling ever to better things Norma Tal- 
madge has opportunity to do some real 
acting, and she is mistress of the situa- 
tion at every point of the play'« progress. 
Thomas Meighan and Alec B. Francis 
lend co-operation, which means much to 
the success of the production. Boiled 
down to its elemental ingredients, it is 
the old story of the woman who plays 
upon her husband's jealousy to hold his 
love. But added threads and subtitles 
that have real weight in their utterances 
make the scheme seem new. None will 
call it trite. But all will consider the 
hour the unreeling takes well spent. 

SYNOPSIS: Harrison Wade, novelist, 
goes with his fiancee and a wealthy roue 
to a resort where wine and woman are 
to be had for the asking. Disgusted with 
his fiancee's flirtation, he meets Jo. an 
orphan here held caotive. and gives her 
money to escape. She fails in her at- 
tempt and is later sent to a reformatory, 
from which she escapes and makes her 
way to the city. To save her from re- 
capture Wade marries her, promising 
to divorce her when her probation is 
served. His former fiancee, having mar- 
ried the millionaire, continues to take 
Wade, whom she really loves, about 
with her. McMerton, Wade's best friend, 
persuades Jo to appear with him at vari- 
ous cafes and thus excite Wade to a 
declaration of the love which he is sure 
exists. This Wade is forced to do. the 
plot is then explained to him. and all 
ends happily. 



Serial Has Been Started 

Work has been started on the new 
Robert W. Chambers' serial, "In Secret." 
in which Pearl White will be starred. 
Director George B. Seitz spent most of 
last week in making location scenes for 
the earlier episodes and on Thursday 
took his company to the famous Barber 
Castle, near Paterson, N. J., which will 
figure as an European stronghold in the, 
serial. 



34 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Billie Rhodes in 

THE LION AND THE LAMB 

Five Part Comedy Drama; Exhibitors' 
Mutual. 

Directed by Francis B. Grandon. 
Published in March. 

OPINION: The personality of the star, 
a personality which made her rise from 
single-reel comedy t'o five-reel drama, an 
event clamored for by the fan body of 
the country, is the chief attraction of 
this, her latest publication. In it she 
has the role of the child bandit who is 
used as an instrument of revenge by a 
society matron disappointed in love. Her 
gradual change of character is well done 
and calls forth that sympathetic admira- 
tion which makes for popularity among 
the family audiences. Melbourne Mac- 
Dowell, as the stern guardian, registers 
an impressive bit of acting. Maude 
George is ideally cast as the disappointed 
and vengeful society woman. A rather 
extended last-reel explanation of events 
transpiring years before slightly weakens 
the conclusion, but the class to which 
the star appeals will hardly find fault 
with this flaw. The play is well quali- 
fied to please that portion of the public 
to which it will appeal. 

SYNOPSIS: "Boots," orphan reared by 
the leader of a gang of crooks, insists 
upon going with them to rob the Syl- 
vester home. Mrs. Sylvester captures 
"Boots," but does not turn her over to 
the police, educating her instead that she 
may marry her to the son of a man who 
has spurned her love. The gang make 
numerous attempts to rescue her but 
fail. She falls in love with the young 
man as desired and the wedding is about 
to take place when she breaks down and 
tells the truth about herself. It is then 
brought to light that she is really a 
descendant of famous Virginia and Eng- 
lish families and perfectly qualified for 
the position which her wifehood will 
offer. The wedding proceeds. 



Billie Burke in 

GOOD GRACIOUS, ANNABELLE 

Five Part Comedy; Paramount. 
Directed by George Melford. 
Published March 2. 

OPINION ; When the picture opens 
there is a feeling that it is going to be 
"another one of those stock market 
things." A little later it shows signs of 
becoming the old "cave man-abduction" 
affair. Then the comedy element enters 
and the play takes on individuality, an 
individuality that is thoroughly divert- 
ing. A comedy is what the production 
really is. The drama which threatened 
to overshadow the first reel is incor- 
porated merely to emphasize the lighter 
plot element. Herbert Rawlinson and 
Billie Burke, the central figures, make 
as pleasing a screen couple as could be 
desired. In roles of this character there 
is no reason why Rawlinson should not 
make for himself a place at the top. The 
picture is ideally suited to the neighbor- 
hood house and the family audience, but 
it is just as well qualified for exhibition 
in any other atmosphere. 

SYNOPSIS: Annabelle lives at a very 
expensive hotel and overdraws her bank 
account. A friend borrows money on 
the two shares of mining stock which 
[she owns. A husband, married under 
peculiar circumstances years before, is, 
unknown to her, after the two shares to 
give him control of the mine. His rival, 
iGeorge Wimbledon, secures the shares 
by fraud. Annabelle and her companions. 
1 equally poverty-stricken, engage as ser- 




Throe MoeneH from "The Lion mid the 
Lamb," with BUlle Rhodes. (Kxhlb- 
torn' Mutual.) 

35 



vants at Wimbledon's country place. 
Here also comes Rawson, her husband, 
whom she does not recognize. Love de- 
velops between them and Annabelle 
wishes she were single. A trick gains 
possession of the shares. She learns 
that her present love is her husband of 
yesteryear and they then begin to be man 
and wife in real earnest. 



Gladys Leslie in 

MISS DULCIE FROM DIXIE 

Five Part Comedy Drama; Vitagraph. 
Directed by Joseph Gleason. 
Published March 24. 

OPINION: A story that is as familiar to 
the close followers of the screen as any 
that can be recalled, plotted and devel- 
oped along the old familiar lines, the 
play is not one that will excite comment. 
Gladys Leslie has one of those simple 
"little girl" roles which put no great 
strain upon the ability. Her light beauty 
and mannerisms are thus free to engage 
the admiration of those who care for 
her style. There is little else in the 
picture to excite that emotion. Toward 
the end of the thing there are substitles 
setting forth certain speeches in dialect 
bv a colored "Mammy" who seems real. 
These are good. The settings are satis- 
factory, the acting of the cast passes 
acceptably, but they are handicapped 
somewhat by lack of worth-while things 
to do. Altogether, the picture is one 
which may be played as a program pub- 
lication without seriously disappointing. 

SYNOPSIS: Dulcie Culpepper lives 
with her grandfather, a southern gentle- 
man whose plantation is buried beneath 
many a mortgage. A quarrel of long 
standing has estranged his son, Dulcie's 
uncle, who now lives in the north and is 
wealthy. A will calculated to mend the 
breach stipulates that Dulcie must live 
six months with her uncle and attempt 
to bring about peace, receiving five thou- 
sand dollars at the end of that time, 
whether or not she is successful. Uncle 
John has a step-son with whom Dulcie 
falls in love, but his mother objects. 
When John threatens to leave all his 
money to Dulcie, having been won over 
to her side, his wife encourages the 
match, thinking to secure the money for 
her son by way of marriage. The quar- 
rel is finally made up and the mating 
permitted to continue, a pleasant ending 
for all concerned coming about naturally. 



Madlaine Traverse in 

GAMBLING IN SOULS 

Five Part Drama; Fox. 
Directed bv Harry Millarde. 
Published March 9. 

OPINION: The mature talent of Mad- 
laine Traverse is perfectly suited to the 
role she is given in this straight and 
rather heavy drama. Revenge is not al- 
ways productive of the best results when 
made the motivating impulse in a photo- 
play, but in this case it has been coupled 
with mother love and the result is an 
interest doubly strong and of finer qual- 
ity. The mechanics of the production 
are about evenly divided. The scenerio 
might have been prepared with more care 
and the action might have been made 
to move with more uniform speed. But 
the settings are lavish and authentic and 
photographed attractively. Every scene 
a serious one, there is no relief to the 
strain of application, but the story is 
one that many will find interesting. The 
picture will not establish a precedent 
for the producer, hut it will maintain 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



the standing that his pictures have at- 
tained. 

SYNOPSIS: When Thomas Philborn 
ruins her hsuband in the market and 
causes him to suicide, Marcine Dunning 
vows vengeance. Failing to gain at- 
mittance to Philborn's office, she goes 
to an old friend, who operates a gambling 
house and presides over the roulette 
wheel, knowing that Philborn's son 
comes there to play. By means of a 
magnetic ring she wins his money and 
taunts him to steal bonds from his 
father's safe. When Philborn comes to 
plead for the return of the bonds to save 
his boy from prison she reveals her 
identity and her revenge is complete. It 
then develops that her daughter has mar- 
ried the boy and she gambles herself 
against the bonds held by the house, wins 
them, returns them, forgives, and mar- 
ries the man who has made her revenge 
possible. 



Anita Stewart in 

FROM HEADQUARTERS 

Five Part Drama; Vitagraph. 
Directed by Ralph Ince. 
Published March 10. 

OPINION: Despite the fact that this 
production is obviously a three reel fea- 
ture stretched into five reels by devoting 
an unusual amount of space to subtitles 
and repetitions it is a drama of unusual 
strength and will prove satisfactory to 
the majority of theatre goers. 

Anita Stewart is given full opportunity 
to display her emotional ability and takes 
advantage of it. The success of the play 
depends almost entirely upon her. While 
she has appeared in pictures more pleas- 
ing from many viewpoints, she has never 
performed more creditably to herself 
than in this Vitagraph special. 

Anders Randolf and Earle Williams, 
the only two others appearing in leading 
parts, give Miss Stewart capable sup- 
port. 

In one particular, the picture is a 
pleasant surprise. It is free from sug- 
gestiveness, despite the fact that its cen- 
tral theme is a man's trifling with a 
woman's affections. 

SYNOPSIS: Rose Peters, daughter of 
Detective Sergeant Peters, accepts a po- 
sition as stenographer for William 
Brown. He amuses himself by making 
love to her and then turns from her to 
another stenographer in his office. In 
anger, she stabs him with a paper knife 
and flees to her home, believing she has 
murdered him. Her father is assigned 
to the case and establishes her guilt. As 
he is struggling between his sense of 
duty and love of his daughter, unde- 
termined as to whether to return a true 
report, a telephone message comes that 
Brown is not dead and requests the 
investigation to be dropped. After re- 
covering from his wound, Brown finds 
he was in love with Rose Peters, wins 
the forgiveness of the girl and her father, 
and marries her. 



Marguerite Clark in 

THREE MEN AND A GIRL 

Five-part comedy-drama; Paramount. 
Directed by Marshall Neilan. 
Published March 16. 

OPINION: "Three Men and a Girl" 
makes its principal appeal through the 
winsome charm of Miss Clark. Taken 
from Edward Childs Carpenter's stage 
play, "The Three Bears," which enjoyed 




TEXAS GCIXAX, 
The female "Bill Hart," appearing in 
Frolimnii Amusement Corp. two- 
reel western dramas. 



a Broadway run, it presented certain 
difficulties to the scenarioist and the di- 
rector by reason of the absence of the 
sprightly dialogue which put the play 
over. The only punch in the play comes 
in the first reel, where Sylvia throws her 
bridal bouquet into the face of her 
astonished fiance and runs away to the 
Adirondack mountains on her wedding 
day. Richard Barthelmess, Percy Mar- 
mont and Jerome Patrick are the three 
women-haters, who vow to eschew the 
society of all women for all time, only to 
fall victims to the smiles of Miss Clark. 
The scenes around Loon Lake, N. Y., 
are pleasing to the eye and artistically 
photographed. 

SYNOPSIS: Sylvia Weston, at the 
behest of her aunt, agrees to marry an 
old man of wealth. At Hymen's altar, 
however, she revolts and runs away to 
a lodge she owns in the mountains. 
Here she comes upon a lawyer, a physi- 
cian and a violinist, who have renounced 
womenkind because of their fickleness, 
and is forced to leave the house for the 
caretaker's hut, because they had pre- 
viously rented it from Sylvia's agent. A 
dead-line is established between the two 
houses, but as the days pass each of the 
'three bears" declare the others are at 
fault for the barrier, and finally Kent, 
the youngest, plights his troth and the 
others acquiesce reluctantly in the love 
romance. 



Buy Novel For Hamilton 

Metro Pictures Corporation has pur- 
chased the picture rights to "After His 
Own Heart" a popular novel by Ben 
Ames Williams. The novel originally 
appeared in serial form in the All-Story 
Weeklv during the month of January. 
Hale Hamilton will star in it. 



Rechristen Picture 

The next John Emerson-Anita Loos 
Production for Paramount has been re- 
christened "Oh, You Women!" the 
former title of the production having 
been "When the Boys Come Home." 



Dalton Sells Rights to 

His "Beyond the Law" 

Emmett Dalton, sole survivor of the 
Dalton Brothers, has returned to New 
York after a tour of the southern ter- 
ritory with his production "Beyond the 
Law." Besides the account of tremen- 
dous business at the houses, in many of 
which he appeared personally, Dalton 
reports two sales of territorial rights on 
the picture. 

New York state and northern New 
Jersey have been bought by Nathan 
Hirsh, president of the new Aywon Film 
Corporation. Mr. Hirsh has arranged 
with Dalton a side-deal involving spe- 
cial publicity and exploitation, and it 
has been decided that in some theatres 
Dalton will make personal appearances. 

Dalton announces also the sale of all 
southern territory to the First National 
of Richmond, Va. This sale, he states, 
was made on the strength of the box 
office receipts of the theatres throughout 
the territory where he played "Beyond 
the Law" himself. 



"For Better, For Worse" 

DeMille's New Artcraft 

Cecil B. DeMille this week satisfied 
the curiosity which has been widely man- 
ifested concerning the theme and title of 
his next Artcarft picture, on which work 
is well under way at the Lasky Holly- 
wood studio. 

"For Better, for Worse," is the title, 
the story having been written by Edgar 
Selwyn and scenarized by William C. 
DeMille. Alvin Wyckoff is the photog- 
rapher. As the title suggests, the play 
hinges upon a marriage, but the picture 
is not a discussion of marriage problems, 
it being totally different in this respect 
from Mr. DeMille's previous production, 
"Don't Change Your Husband." The 
problems arising from marriage as an in- 
stitution are not touched upon at all in 
the play. 

"A Taste of Life" New 

Edith Roberts Film 

"A Taste of Life" is the permanent 
title given the latest Edith Roberts Uni- 
versal film. One of the last stories 
written by Paul West, who recently died 
in Paris, the Roberts' play was pro- 
duced under the tentative title "Wher, 
Cherries Are Ripe." Jack Dillon pro- 
duced the film and in support of Miss 
Roberts are "Smiling" Billy Mason 
George Hernandez, May Emory anc 
Harry. Todd. "A Taste of Life" i: 
scheduled for March 3 . 



New World Photoplay 

Is Not a War Picture 

At the Port Lee studio of World Pic 
tures work is in progress on the all 
story feature, "The Price of Doubt," ii 
which Montagu Love, June Elvidge 
Evelyn Greeley, George MacQuarrie 
Jack Drumier and Johnnie Hines wil 
be starred. This photoplay is not i, 
war picture. The scenario was writtei 
by Wallace Clifton and Harry O. Hoyl 
under the direction of Charles Sarvei 
scenario editor of World Pictures. De 
Henderson is directing. 



36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Heraldgrams 

lillllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll./. R. JllllIIlUllIlllillUllHJIIIIIIIliniHIIIIllllllIIllllllHIIIimtitUllIIlllllIII^ 

Sol Lesser paid $150,000 for "Yankee Doodle" the other 
day. Can't be said, however, he got it for a song. 



McAdoo says he's not a star; just a legal pilot. Still, he's 
getting a star's salary. 



The Gentry Film Corporation is all "het up" over its coal 
picture, "The Key to Power," which the Educational Films 
Corporation was handling. They want $25,000. Some coal bill. 



And now the reformers want to abolish chewing gum. 
There's where they get in bad with the telephone girls. We'd 
like to see one try to get a number after that goes through. 



Somehow this sounds familiar: "The exhibitors are going 
'to have the most equitable distributing proposition they have 
lever had." — Bennie Schulberg. 



About the only guy left who hasn't pulled that "it was 
a frame-up" fight stuff is one Bill Hohenzollern. Oh, well, 
give him four or five years to think it over and maybe he will. 



Somebody's always taking the joy out of life. The owners 
of the Longacre building, New York, have ordered the actors 
.to keep moving and not loiter in the big hallway. Many of 
the stenographers in the building have quit their jobs since 
the order went into effect. 



Ford has invented a $250 auto. Now, if some one comes 
along with a $250 up-keep, we're all set. 



One of our Constant Readers complains that he broke a 
leg last week rolling off of a couch after reading that "Better 
'Ole" joke and wants to know what we're going to do about 
it. As a testimonial, it's worth about thirty cents — if we had 
the thirty. 



Paris expects to be an oasis for thirsty Americans after 
July 1, if the U. S. goes dry, says a news item. It's going to 
be a long wait between conferences if the film magnates go 
out to wet their whistles at noon, ain't it? 



FAMILIAR HEADLINES 

Forms Own Company. 

Will Make Eight Pictures a Year. 

Star Plays a Dual Role. 

Most Important Co-operative Move in History of Industry. 
Writers of International Prominence Will Furnish Plots. 
Denies Rumor of Affiliation. 
Will Not Join "Big Four." 



McAdoo probably heard that Raymond Hitchcock was 
going after government ownership of railroads and decided 
to duck out while the ducking was good. 'Member what 
Hitchy said about Bryan and Billy Sunday. 



That pugilist who was sent to Leavenworth for a post 
graduate course, for making lead dimes, got the wrong hunch 
about making money easy. He should have horned into the 
film game. 



George Washington Grant of Cleveland, owner of a string 
of motion picture theatres in London, Eng., paid $400,000 last 
week for an interest in the Boston Nationals. If the Braves 
don't finish first this season he'll wish he'd stuck those 
400,000 smackers into more picture houses. 



Fig leaves for wearing apparel will be about one's limit 
if somebody doesn't flag that peace congress bunch. They've 
forgotten all about the war and are now discussing a thirteen- 
month calendar. Twelve gas bills a year is about enough 
for one salary. 



■j Boston doctor has discovered it is dangerous to kiss 
blondes. And yet there's a lota guys who will go right ahead 
without looking up the 'phone of the nearest' hospital. 

Many an exhibitor will be glad to put those four stars 
in his service flag— if he can get 'em on the percentage basis. 
And our star reporter says that's the latest dope from the 
w. k. west coast. 




Pays for 
Itself 
Pays the 
Rent 

Pays a Profk 

Make 
Money 

From Waste Space in Your 
Theatre Lobby 

Here's a machine you'll find an ornament to your 
lobby — one that will prove a drawing card — be- 
sides making money for you. 

Takes up less than five square feet of floor space 
— 26 x 32 inches exactly. Needs hardly any atten- 
tion — operates itself as well as paying for itself. 

$600 to $3,120 yearly income — Picture Theatres, 
Ball Rooms, Skating Rinks, Amusement Parks, Car- 
nivals, Summer Resorts. 

LtirK) 

Com Madxb 

Here's the machine that gives the people what they 
want. Its fascinating mechanism attracts notice — its 
coaxing fragrance brings trade for blocks — its distinct 
flavor makes steady customers. 

Everybody loves pop corn, everybody wants the Butter- 
Kist kind — and everybody has the money to pay for it. An 
average of 90 bags a day means about $1,000 a year profit. 

The Coupon Brings the Book — A Small 
Deposit Brings the Machine 

Buy your machine out of the profits it makes. Our 
Easy Payment Plan makes it possible. 

Don't let anything stop you. Fill in and mail the coupon 
now. Be first in your neighborhood to seize this op- 
portunity. 

Valuable fEs* 





This coupon has 
started many a show 
man on the road to 
new profits. 

Each read an "ad" 
like this and had the 
horse-sense to know 
it costs nothing but 
a postage stamp to 
investigate. 

Holcomb & Hoke Mfg. Co. 
102 Van Burcn St. 
Indianapolis, Ind. i : 



r 

\ For Proofs, Photos, Prices » 



HOLCOMB & HOKE MFG. CO. 
102 V. in Burcn St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Without obligation, send me your 
free Butter-Kist book— ''America's New 
Industry" — with photos, sales records 
and estimate of how much I can make 
with your machine. 



Name t 

* 

Business t 

t 

Address ... J 



37 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Norma Talmadge Film 
Corporation Enlarges 

Its New York Studio 

The Norma Talmadge Film Corpora- 
tion has just purchased the six-story red 
brick building at 324 East 48th Street, 
New York City, adjoining the Norma 
Talmadge Studios at 318 East 48th, and 
work will shortly be started to convert 
this flat-house building into a new wing 
of the studios. When the renovations 
are completed, the Norma Talmadge 
Studios will have a frontage of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five feet, which means 
that the Select star is to own the largest 
of any of the downtown motion picture 
studios in New York City. This pur- 
chase is another move on Joseph M. 
Schenck's part which is quite in accord 
with his determined policy to give Miss 
Talmadge even bigger pictures and bet- 
ter productions than ever. 

When the new wing of the Norma Tal- 
madge Studios shall have been com- 
pleted, it is planned to transfer the 
offices to that section, so that the execu- 
tive offices, director's rooms, scenario 
and title writers, press department, and 
stenographers' quarters, will all be con- 
veniently located within the same build- 
ing. 



BOBBY'S HOME 



Hiram Abrams Enters 

State Rights Market 

Hiram Abrams has secured George 
Beban's latest production, "Hearts of 
Men," which is the first production 
Beban has ever offered to independent 
buyers. This is the last picture that 
will ever be offered to the trade by Mr. 
Abrams on a state rights basis, as he is 
soon to devote his efforts to the general 
managership of the United Artists' Dis- 
tributing Corporation. 

George Beban's former pictures have 
been released by Paramount, and this 
first departure on the part of the star 
from program releasing indicates he will 
in the future distribute his pictures 
through independent exchanges. 

Sol Lesser, it is announced, has pur- 
chased the rights to the Pacific Coast 
states. 



Peggy Hyland Begins 

New Film at Hollywood 

Under the direction of Lynn F. Rey- 
nolds, Peggy Hyland has just begun 
another William Fox Excel Picture at 
Hollywood. This is the second Hyland 
picture which Mr. Reynolds has directed, 
the other being "The Unkissed Bride" 
which has its setting in the Ozark Moun- 
tains of Missouri. 

The new picture bears the temporary 
title "Miss Adventure." The story was 
written by J. Anthony Roach, and in her 
supporting company Miss Hyland has 
Ed. Burns, Frank Brownlee, J. Dwiggins, 
George Webb and Rockwell Mason. 



Vote on Sunday Question 

LINCOLN, ILL.— With 605 names on 
the petition requesting that the ques- 
tion of Sunday theatres be submitted to 
the people here in April, it is now cer- 
tain that the proposition will be on the 
ballot. 



TheChristie Comedy Star, Bobby 
Vernon, Back from War Soon 
to Appear in "Bobby Comes 
Marching Home" 




Fox Film Corporation 

Hiring All Service Men 

In compliance with the William Fox 
policy of taking back all men of the 
Fox Film Corporation who left the or- 
ganization to enter the army, two more 
Fox employes returned to the employ 
of William Fox this week. 

Leon Bamberger, formerly head of the 
contract department, who entered the 
army last September and was sent to 
Camp Greene, S. C, has been honorably 
discharged and is once more in the Fox 
fold. 

Another to return is Sergeant M. C. 
Felder, formerly of the Fox Film Cor- 
poration's New York Exchange, who en- 
listed in September, 1917. He was sent 
to Camp Upton, where he was placed 
in charge of- motion picture entertain- 
ment at the camp theatre. Later he was 
transferred to the photographic division, 
48th Service Company, Signal Corps, 
where he served as personnel officer. 
Discharged last month, Sergeant Felder 
is now back at the New York exchange. 



Schwalbe Is Honored 

A testimonial dinner to Harry L. 
Schwalbe, secretary-treasurer of First 
National Exhibitors' Circuit, as an evi- 
dence of appreciation for his loyalty to 
the Circuit and his allegiance to his 
associates in it, was given at the Hotel 
Astor recently by a number of the 
franchise owners and employees. 

38 



W. H. Productions Dispose 
Of All Rights to "Mickey" 

The rights to "Mickey," Mack Sen-j 
nett's seven-reel superproduction, have 
now been disposed of for the' entirei 
world. 

In the United States the territories 
are controlled by the following ex- 
changes: Magnet Film Exchange, New--! 
York City, for Greater New York; 
Gardiner Syndicate, Buffalo, N. Y., for 
New York State north of Westchester. \ 
County; Boston Photoplay Corporation, 
Boston, Mass., for New England; Su- ' 
preme Photoplay Productions, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., for Pennsylvania, Ohio and 
West Virginia; Sidney B. Lust, Wash- 
ington, D. C, for Maryland, Dela., Dis- 
trict of Columbia and Virginia; Mr. S. ; 
J. Samuels for Georgia, Florida, Ala-- 
bama, Tennessee. North and South Car- ' 
olina; Kentucky to Big Feature Film 
Company; Mickey Film Corporation of 
Chicago for Illinois; Wisconsin Film 
Corporation of Milwaukee for the State 
of Wisconsin; J. Horwitz Productions 
for Michigan; Leon Victor of Kansas 
City for Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and! 
Nebraska; De Luxe Feature Film Com- 
pany of Seattle for Washington, Ore- 
gon, Idaho, Montana. Minnesota. North 
and South Dakota, Texas, Oklahoma, 
Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi; 
Midwest Greater Features Company for 
Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and New 
Mexico, and Sol. Lesser, All Star Fea- 
tures Distributors, San Francisco, for 
California and Nevada. 



Would End Delays in 

Return of Film by Mail 

At a meeting of the Transportation 
Committee of the National Association 
of the Motion Picture Industry held at 
the Association offices in New York City 
last Friday morning, it was decided to 
make a strenuous attempt to have unr! 
delivered shipments of film returned to 
the exchanges postage collect. 

According to the present law and the 
rules and regulations of the post office 
department, if a film shipment is uncalled 
for or cannot be delivered, the post- 
masters are not permitted to return it 
to the exchanges until the postage has 
been forwarded. This causes an enor- 
mous delay and the loss of a great deal 
of money as the film is frequently lying 
idle in the post office for several days. 



College Play Author 

Directs Alice Brady 

Select Pictures Corporation announces 
that Kenneth B. Webb has been engaged 
to direct Alice Brady in a forthcoming 
Select Picture, the one which will follow 
her latest attraction, "The World to Live 
In," which is being distributed as a Feb- 
ruary production. The title of the pic- 
ture has not been announced. 

Miss Brady's new director is the 
author and stage director of several very 
well known Columbia University comic 
operas, including "The Dream Girl," 
"The Forbidden City," "Leap Year 
Land," "The Mountaineers," and "The 
Best Sellers." 



A PERSONALITY PROGRAM 



Of the mass of programs, newspaper clippings, heralds, pluggers, etc., brought in with the daily mail none are more 
striking in their power to impress than the little folder put out by Charles H. Ryan, manager of the Garfield theatre, Chi- 
cago, and reproduced below. 

Here is a practical application of the "individuality idea" advocated in this department last week. And it has, to our 
knowledge, two years of history to bespeak the genuine worth of the theory. 

Ryan's program is not a work of art, as that term is commonly interpreted. It is printed upon heavy salmon-colored 
stock and measures A}^ by S J / 2 inches. There are no cuts used in its make-up. It is durable, readable, convenient yet 
sufficient. 

it is always in good shape, always a truly 
"ready" reference. 

Can those things be said of the pre- 
tentious, showy, manicolored programs 
affected by the man who is. willing to 
spend money for advertising and thinks 
that the way to get the best is to get 
the most expensive? 

Can these things be said of the minia- 
ture magazines published as house or- 
gans by some of the larger theatres in 
the country? 

In the Garfield's neighborhood the 
little red folder 



All these things make for economy, 
which is always a point to be considered, 
yet they are not to be considered as 
desirable for that fact alone. 

There is especially noticeable economy 
of words. 

Economy of words is one of the most 
valuable assets an ad can possess, what- 
ever the article advertised. 

"Eventually— Why Not Now?" 

''A Case of Good Judgment." 

"It Chases Dirt." 

"Mild? Sure. Yet They Satisfy." 

The firms that buy the space against 
which these brief lines are thrown in a 
national cam- 
paign certainly 
do not consider 
'monetary econ- 
omy alone in 
their advertising 
plans. The space 
that they use to 
back up a single 
Exhibition of 
their favorite line 
:would accom- 
modate a history 
I of their product 
from its birth in 
the mind of the 
loriginator to the 
present, plus a 
forecast as ex- 
pensive as desir- 
able. 

Still there is 
economy of 
words. 

And the prod- 
ucts afe known 
the world over 

land inseparably linked up with these 
lines. 

; The Garfield program does not go as 
( far as that. It contains a bit of infor- 
mation about every picture listed as an 
attraction of the week. It gives such 
'details as admission prices, matinee and 
evening, adult and juvenile. The short 
subjects are listed. Everything that 
jcould possibly occur to the inquisitive 
iprospective customer is there for him to 
lcar.n. 

I But there isn't a wasted word in the 
whole composition. 

J Note also, the phraseology in which 

);the matter is written. 

/. 



No stilted composition here. No long 
descriptions. No superlatives. No 
statement that cannot stand the test of 
attendance. 



\ 





Just snappy, clean, American English. 

It doesn't take too long to read it. 
Therefore it is read. 

It doesn't take much room to keep it. 

The star, the play, the outstanding 
point of the production. The day, the 
price, the added attractions. Therefore, 
it is kept. 

It is not easily destroyed. Therefore 

39 



is an established 
institution. It ar- 
rives in the mail 
every week. It 
always looks the 
same. It always 
tells just so much 
about the pro- 
grams of that 
week, no more 
and no less. 

Neighborhood 
patronage quick- 
ly learns the 
quality of the va- 
r i o u s programs 
offered by thea- 
tres in that 
•neighbo r h o o d . 
They quickly 
learn that the 
poorest pic t u r e 
on their favorite 
program is bet- 
ter than the best 
on another. At 
least they form such beliefs. And the 
weekly queries they voice are not. "What 
kind of an actress is So-and-so?" or, 
"What kind of pictures does the This-or- 
that Company turn out?" 

They ask, "What is the idea of So- 
and-so's play this time?" and that is 
the information Ryan gives them. 

Altogether, Ryan's program is an ob- 
ject of interest. His patronage is in- 
terested in it. His competitors are in- 
terested in it. It is an "old timer'* in 
the field, and none of the younger gen- 
eration of program schemes have as 
yet surpassed it. 

The program itself, and more es- 
pecially the principles which underlie 




EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



its designing and composition, should 
be examined by every exhibitor who 
advertises. 



REAL SHOWMANSHIP 



Harry Hull Burford, manager of the 
Bijou theatre, La Crosse, Wis., put on 
a celebration not long ago which has 
a double value as an example of show- 
manship. 

La Crosse, a city of thirty thousand 
population, is possessed of seven mo- 
tion picture theatres. Obviously, there 
is keen competition. In a city of that 
size the isolation of the neighborhood 
theatre is not to be depended upon to 
keep a certain portion of the population 
true to any one house. Neither is it 
possible to put over a day by day policy 
involving flagrant advertising and in- 
ferior pictures. 

The rheatre that is successful must 
give value received for the admission 
charged, and it must compete with the 
opposition on merit alone. 

The policy of each theatre is known . 
to every person in town, and by that 
policy is the theatre judged. 

Burford discovered one day that it 
would soon be ten years since he "set 
up shop" at the Bijou. Looking back, 
he saw the many changes that had taken 
place in the industry in that time. He 
also saw that picture prices had changed 
considerably, that expenses generally 
had gone up and up and up, but never 
down. 

And he was still selling tickets for 
ten cents each, just as he had on the 
opening day. The facts seemed not to 
harmonize. Still, a change of price in 
a town of that size is fraught with 
danger. A few cents makes a great 
difference when the man across the 
street doesn't change with you. 

* * * 

The result of his cogitation was an in- 
novation. 

He bought "Tarzan of the Apes." He 
paid more for it ^han he had ever paid 
for a picture in the history of the house. 
At the same time he contracted for 
"The Romance of Tarzan," the follow- 
up picture. 

He bought space with a free hand and 
built his copy upon the "Tenth Anniver- 
sary" idea. 

"Tarzan of the Apes," because of the 
unique nature of the story, presented 
unusual opportunities for advertising. 
Burford took full advantage of these 
and ran a series of ads culminating in 
a half-page spread which was a master- 
piece. 

The people came. They taxed the 
five hundred seat capacity of the Bijou 
to the limit. La Crosse came to see, 
paused to admire and went away to 
remember. 

The picture was of a new variety to 
them. The manner of presentation, the 
atmosphere of the house, was new. 

Incidentally, but so well had Burford 
managed it was only incidentally, the 
price was new. 



La Crosse liked the innovation. And 
in liking the whole they liked the de- 
tails. The change in price and policy 
was a factor. 

Burford does not charge ten cents 
any more. But it is not likely that ten 
persons in La Crosse really realize the 
change. 

At least, they continue to come as 
often as before. 

By thus combining his anniversary 
celebration and his change of policy, he 
put over the latter under cover of the 
former. 

That is showmanship. 



Suit Manufacturer 

Uses Press Book to 

Advertise His Wares 

The practical value of a suggestion to 
exhibitors for local advertising on "Vir- 
tuous Wives," first of the Anita Stew- 
art productions to be distributed by 
First National Exhibitors' Circuit, which 
is made in the press sheet for that re- 
lease, is given in an experience reported 
by Harry Weiss, manager of the Central 
Film Company of Chicago as the result 
of a recent trip to St. Louis. 

Mr. Weiss carried with him a sales- 
man's manual for "Virtuous Wives," in 
which are a number of stills from the 
picture, together with a series of star 
photographs of Miss Stewart, showing 
her in various costumes that lead the 
current fashions. In visiting with an 
exhibitor, Mr. Weiss was introduced to 
a representative of a large ladies' suit 
manufacturing company, to whom he 
showed the manual as an example of 
how film salesmen are equipped to vis- 
ualize their wares. The clothing sales- 
man immediately requested a copy of 
that part of the manual which includes 
the photos of Miss Stewart. He ex- 
plained that he wanted it to show to his 
customers and prospec'is and to enable 
him to point out to them the popularity 
of the models with a motion picture 
star. 

Mr. Weiss explained that it is sug- 
gested to exhibitors that they use this 
set of photos of Miss Stewart for dis- 
play in the windows of the leading local 
\adies' furnishings stores, getting the 
dealers to show, at the same time, mod- 
els from stock which are similar to those 
worn by Miss Stewart in the stills. In 
this way local feminine interest can be 
aroused in the costuming of the pro- 
duction. The clothing salesman voiced 
his intention to strongly urge every re- 
tailer he calls on to take advantage of 
this possibility for co-operatinve adver- 
tising to the benefit of his store and to 
the theatre as well. 

"The big fellows in other lines of busi- 
ness appreciate the value of seemingly 
small opportunities such as this for do- 
ing something a little bit novel and 
unique." said Air. Weiss, "so why 
shouldn't it have just as much value and 
importance to the exhibitors?" 



Texas Exhibitor Plans 

Two Modern Theatres 

E. H. Hulsey of Dallas, Texas, and 
one of the best known exhibitors in the 
United States is in New York. 

Mr. Hulsey contemplates erecting two 
new theatres, one at Dallas, and another 
at Houston, Texas. He is a First Na- 
tional Exhibitors Circuit franchise 
holder. 



Shoe Shop Go-Operates 
With Theatre Manager; 

Result — Big Houses 

C. W. Taylor, branch manager of 
Select Pictures' Omaha exchange, 
brought to the attention of the home 
office recently an example of co-opera- 
tion between tradesman and exhibitor 
that is worth passing along to other 
exhibitors who read this paper. 

The point of co-operation in question 
concerns Constance Talmadge's recent 
picture, "Mrs. Leffingwell's Boots," 
which was billed at the Strand theatre in 
Omaha. Realizing the many possibilities 
of getting this attraction over to the pub- 
lic, Manager Stolte of the Strand got in 
touch with the proprietor of Omaha's 
most exclusive shoe shop and arranged 
a deal whereby he placed a pair of em- 
broidered slippers in his show window, 
supplemented by pictures of Constance 
Talmadge, with a sign reading: "These 
are the boots — see the play at the Strand 
this week." 

On the other hand Manager Stolte ar- 
ranged a table in his lobby on which 
were shown a pair of slippers borrowed 
from the shoe shop. In this manner 
both the theatre manager and the propri- 
etor of the shoe shop got a fair amount 
of free advertising. 



Sign Important Contract 

One of the most important recent 
deals engineered by the Film Market, 
Inc., was the placing of a long term 
contract with Sres, Gonzalo Varela S. 
en C, leading film importers and ex- 
change men of Mexico, for the exclusive 
agency throughout Mexico, Guatemala 
and San Salvador of the Precision Ma- 
chine Company's Simplex Projectors and 
parts. The contracts calls for Simplex 
Service Stations to be established 
throughout the three republics. 



Film Goodwin Success 

Earle Williams is embarking on a 
screen version of the late Nat C. Good- 
win's famous starring vehicle, "The 
Usurper," for Vitagraph. 



"Peggy" Rights Sold 

The S. A. Lynch Enterprises has sold 
the rights for "Peggy," covering the ter- 
ritories of Kentucky and Ohio, to Mr. 
Burt Barliett, representing the Star Fea- 
ture Film Service. 



Pathe Secures Gray 

George Arthur Gray, magazine writer 
and reviewer, and recently on the ed 
itorial staff of the Dramatic Mirror, ha 
joined the Pathe organization as assist 
ant manager of serial publicity. Sever" 
other additions have been made, neces 
sitating larger quarters for the advertis 
ing and publicity departments. 



Theatre Resembles Church 

DAVENPORT, IA.— The new Vande 
Veer Park Theatre, to be erected by H 
E. Winters and Dr. W. A. Stoecker 
will closely resemble a church. It wil 
cost $40,000 and will seat 700 people. 



40 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



The St ar vs. The St ory 

A DIGEST OF CASH DRAWER DECISIONS BASED 
UPON THE CECIL B. DeMILLE PRODUCTIONS 

The reports beginning on this page are selected as representative of a nation-wide response by exhibitors 
upon questionnaires designed to determine the actual box office values of the Cecil V. DeMille Specials and the 
principle which they represent. 

DeMille Special Productions rely for their strength upon the excellence of their stories and the way that story 
is told. The star is a secondary consideration. 

DeMille's effort is directly in line with the theory that has been advanced by every exhibitor that has had to 
turn his profit over to a star whose name has placed him or her in a position to demand it. That means just 
about every exhibitor in the business. 

In this effort to ascertain the real check-book value of that theory in application Exhibitors Herald and 
Motography has exerted absolutely no influence in either direction. The answers are the results of actual expe- 
rience. They are authentic. 

They tell an important story. 



Summary 

In answer to the first question, "Do 
your patrons like the DeMille pictures?" 
four-fifths of the exhibitors reply in the 
affirmative. It would be hard to find a 
class of pictures that would elicit a more 
favorable response. The pictures must 
be pleasing. The second query brings 
out the reasons. 

"If liked, what are the chief points 
of popularity?" 

Excellence of production and direction 
seems to be the most popular answer. 
The story comes second, quality and 
uniformity of casts third and one man 
mentions photography as the strongest 
point. 

It is significant that the work of a 
single actor or actress is not mentioned 
in one of the reports. 

"Is the absence of a big star name a 
handicap to these pictures?" That was 
the most important question of all. 

Two Favor Star 

It is a telling indication of the general 
dissatisfaction with the star system that 
a careful search of the whole mass of 
answers reveals but two affirmative. Two 
men, out of the whole field, believe that 
the picture depends upon the star. 

Are the two right? Or is the over- 
whelming majority right? 

The field was evenly divided upon the 
last question. 

"Does the. name, DeMille, carry these 
pictures with your patrons?" 

In the light of the first three answers 
it would not be strange if the producer's 
name were given credit for the success 
of the pictures. But the giving of such 
credit would reduce the scheme advo- 
cated to a mere matter of substitu- 
tion. % 

The equal division of answers shows 
that the question is not a definitely set- 
tled one in the mind of the exhibitor. 

Read the reports and make your own 
decision. 

MAJESTIC THEATRE, LEX- 
INGTON, NEB.— Played "Till I 
Come Back to You." Patrons di- 
vided. Some said great. Others 
said too much kid idea to story. 
The story, not the star, is the chief 
point of popularity. The absence 



of a big star name is no handicap, 
but De Mille's name does not carry 
the pictures. 

O. H.' SCHLEUSENER, SU- 
PERBA THEATRE, ALHAM- 
BRA, CAL. — The story and direc- 
tor make the De Mille pictures 
favorites with our patrons. The 
name of the director is as good as 
that of any star in this locality. 

SAYWARD AND WILLEY, CO- 
LONIAL THEATRE, ROCHES- 
TER, N. H.— De Mille is the most 
consistent producer producing for 
Famous Players. The chief reason 
for the popularity of the pictures 
is the fact that they are different 
from others. The absence of the 




Cecil It. Uc Mille 

star name is no handicap, but the 
producer's name does not carry the 
pictures. We Enow we can depend 
upon the pictures, so we go the 
limit on the advertising. Did our 
biggest Saturday business on 
"Don't Change Your Husband," 
but it's the advertising. 

J. T. HATCH, WONDERLAND 
THEATRE, KAUFMAN, TEX.— 
The De Mille pictures arc all good. 
Our patrons like them for their 
stories. The director's name is as 
good as that of any star. 

41 



H. H. WILSON, SHERMAN 
THEATRE, SULLIVAN, IND.— 
My patrons like the De Mille pic- 
tures fairly well because they are 
clean. The absence of a star's 
name is no handicap, nor is the 
producer's name sufficient to carry 
the pictures. Advertise the picture. 

E. O. KEEFE, REGENT THEA- 
TRE, BILLINGS, MONT.— De 
Mille's productions are liked by 
our patrons because of their grip- 
ping stories, beautiful sets and ex- 
cellent casts. The absence of a 
big star's name is no handicap and 
De Mille's name has carried the 
plays lately. He is one of the best 
directors in the game. 

WILL F. KRAHN, LORIN 
THEATRE, BERKELEY, CAL. 
— We find that our patrons like 
the De Mille productions because 
of their general all-around excel- 
lence. The absence of the big star 
name seems no handicap. The title 
is what many of our patrons are 
guided by. Author or director does 
not matter. 

J. B. KOPPEL, RIVIERA THEA- 
TRE, CHICAGO, ILL.— Our pat- 
rons like the De Mille pictures 
very much, chiefly because they 
are so well directed. The name of 
the producer serves as well as 
would that of a star. "Don't 
Change Your Husband" is one of 
the best pictures made. If we had 
fewer pictures and more like "The 
Squaw Man" the whole business 
would profit. 

R. T. MEGIBBON, REGENT 
TH EATRE, CLEVELAND, 
MISS. — In our case the De Mille 
specials owe their popularity to 
their general excellence. De Mille's 
name carries the pictures; the lack 
of a big star name is no handicap. 
I advertise De Mille and the usual 
excellent quality of his productions. 
Types and characterizations always 
good. 

M. H. CAREY, MAIESTIC 
THEATRE, WTLMAR, MINN.— 
My patrons like the De Mille pic- 
tures very much because they are 
always built upon good subject 
matter. The lack of a star's name 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



is not made up for by that of the 
director. 

STAR THEATRE, GILSON- 
BURG, O— Our patrons like the 
De Mille productions because they 
are always good pictures. Lack of 
a star's name is no handicap. The 
producer's name carries with the 
public. 

R. J. RELF, STAR THEATRE, 
DECORAH, IA.— The De Mille 
pictures are liked by our patrons 
when the subject matter appeals. 
Their popularity is chiefly due to 
the well directed stories told. We 
find the absence of a star's name 
a handicap which the name of the 
producer does not overcome. Have 
never featured a producer. 

A. S. PICKER, REX THEATRE, 
IRONWOOD, MICH.— I advocate 
production and producer. The De 
Mille pictures are liked because of 
these points. The name of the 
producer serves as well as would 
that of a star. 

C. E. ZINK, ALHAMBRA THEA- 
TRE, KNIGHTSTOWN, IND.— 
The De Mille pictures are just 
fairly well liked by our patrons. 
The absence of a star's name is a 
handicap and the producer's name 
does not carry witii the public. 

H. M. THOMAS, RIALTO 
THEATRE, OMAHA, NEB.— My 
patrons like the De Mille pictures 
very much. They are the best 
made pictures today. The absence 
of a big star name is no handicap, 
the name of the producer carrying 
the pictures with the public. I 
think the series is great. 

JACK TRUITT, S ED ALIA 
THEATRE, SEDALIA, MO.— 
My patrons are about evenly di- 
vided on the subject of De Mille 
Special Productions. The absence 
of a star's name seems to be a 
handicap not 'overcome by the 
name of the producer. I consider 
the title a more important business- 
getting factor than the name of the 
director. The box office value of 
the series is fair, but as to enter- 
tainment value, they are not for 
the masses. 

STEVE FARRAR, ORPHEUM 
THEATRE, HARRISBURG, ILL. 
— The casts in these pictures could 
not be improved upon, and they 
are almost perfect pictures from 
every angle. The people like them 
because of the perfect casts. The 
name of the producer does not 
draw, but the title makes up. 

F. R. SMITH, BIJOU THEATRE, 
FOND DU LAC, WIS— Because 
real stories and productions are 
not sacrificed for a star, my pat- 
rons like the De Mille Specials 
very much. The name of the pro- 
ducer suffices. Stars are not neces- 
sary. Give us more pictures like 
these and forget the stars. Better 
box office attractions than any star 
we have. 

CHARLES H. RYAN, GAR- 
FIELD THEATRE, CHICAGO, 
ILL.— I find that the box office 
value depends upon the titles and 
the popularity of the story, like 
"The Squaw Man." The entertain- 
ment value is very good. My pat- 
rons like the De Mille Specials be- 
cause of the sincerity and the per- 
fect detail in which they are worked 



out. The casts are also a valuable 
asset. The name of the producer 
absolutely does not carry the pic- 
ture with my patrons. About "Class 
C" rating should be paid for these 
pictures, instead of the "Class A" 
rating which we have to pay. De 
Mille's name means no more to our 
box office receipts than does the 
author of the story, and you know 
how much that counts. 



Short Programs Popular 

Manager J. E. Burke of the Crystal 
theatre, Okemah, Okla., has built up his 
weak business days with novelty pro- 
grams, he advises. Mr. Burke states in 
a letter to the Universal exchange, Okla- 
homa City, "I consider 'The Lure of the 
Circus' with a two-reel Western and a 
Nestor or Lyons-Moran comedy a first 
class program to offer if you want to 
build up an off day. This I have done. 
We are constantly receiving compliments 
on Universal productions we show regu- 
larly and these novelty programs have 
created much favorable comment." 

L. W. Brophy of the Yale theater, 
Muskogee, Okla., is another Southern 
exhibitor who has had success with short 
reel subjects. 



Washburn Rube Again 

Convinced by its reports from ex- 
hibitors that the public wants to see 
Bryant Washburn in small-town roles, 
the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation 
has started another Paramount pro- 
duction in which Washburn will be seen 
in that type of characterization. The 
new picture is titled "The Village Cut- 
Up," taken from a story which was pub- 
lished serially in the Pictorial Review. 



Under- Water Sets Will 

Feature Macdon Comedy 

"Neptune's Step-Daughter" is the title 
of the first two-part Macdon Comedy 
which was written and directed by Frank 
P. Donovan and stars Gertrude Selby, 
former Sennett and Sunshine Comedy 
star. 

The comedy is the first to be produced 
entirely under water, with spectacular 
sets and specially constructed properties 
designed by William B. MacNulty with 
Albert Fowler, late technical and art di- 
rector for Clara Kimball Young, acting 
in the s,ame capacity for the Macdon 
Comedies. The picture is said to offer 
something new in the line of farce 
comedy. The Macdon Comedies will 
make twenty-six two-reel farce comedies 
a year. 



New Studio to Open 

SANTA CRUZ. CAL.— Mr. and Mrs. 
J. L. French, H. J. Mitchell and Harold 
McAlpin have arrived here from New 
York for the purpose of locating a stu- 
dio here. Ted Howland, formerly of 
Vitagraph, will be director. The com- 
pany will produce comedies. 



Find Stolen Films 

CLEVELAND, O.— Managerial ambi- 
tions of a sixteen year old employe of a 
down town film company were nipped in 
the bud when Detective Woodring inter- 
rupted a motion picture show which the 
lad was staging. Five hundred dollars 
worth of films were found in his posses- 
sion. 



Leases Minneapolis House 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— Lease of 
the Shubert theatre to James V. Bryson' 
well known motion picture man, has been 
announced by L. N. Scott and the Shubert 
corporation. Mr. Bryson announces that 
he will play only big feature pictures. 




Olive Thomas stars in tills feature direeted by Frank Borzage. Norman Kerry appears 

in her support. 



42 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



"What the Picture Did For Me" 

VERDICTS ON FILMS IN LANGUAGE OF EXHIBITOR 

Copyright, 1919 



The criticisms contained in this department of Exhibitors Herald and Motography are truthful statements relative 
to the actual box office value of the pictures. If the picture you wish to know about is not included, write Exhibitors 
Herald and Motography and the information will be sent you promptly. Using blank form on last page of department, 
write us your experience with the pictures you are showing. Address Exhibitors Herald and Motography, 417 South 
Dearborn street, Chicago, III. 



American-Pathe 

The Amazing Impostor, with Mary 
Miles Minter. — A fair program offer- 
ing. — S. A. Hayman, Lyda theatre, 
Grand Island, Neb. — Down town pat- 
ronage. 

The Mantle of Charity, with Mar- 
guerita Fisher. — This is a very fine 
light comedy and your patrons will like 
it. — Guy W. Johnson, Mystic theatre, 
Marmarth, N. D. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

Mqney Isn't Everything, with Mar- 
guerita Fisher. — A dandy light comedy 
drama. Good business to good house. — 
W. H. Ingraham, Rex theatre, Fairfax, 
Okla. — High class patronage. 

When a Man Rides Alone, with Wil- 
liam Russell. — Very good. Star good 
drawing card. — L. F. Keiler, Arcade 
theatre, Paducah, Ky.— General patron- 
age. 

The Amazing Impostor, with Mary 
Miles Minter. — Good subject. Well 
worked out. — Fred Busman, Electric 
theatre, St. Joseph, Mo. — Mixed patron- 
age. 

Wives and Other Wives, with Mary 
Miles Minter. — The kind of picture that 
will please any audience. Exceptionally 
good. — Guy W. Johnson, Mystic the- 
atre, Marmarth, N. D. — Middle class 
patronage. 

Artcraft 

Mr. Fix It, with Douglas Fairbanks. — 
Capacity business. Did not hear the 
usual pleasing comments. — A. D. Stanch- 
field, Rae theatre, Ann Arbor, Mich- 
Mixed patronage. 

Wolves of the Rail, with William S. 
Hart. — Drew well and pleased. Better 
than most of the Harts. — H. G. Thorpe, 
New Grand theatre, Crosby, Minn. — 
Mining town. 

Shark Monroe, with William S. Hart. 
— Pleased better than some of star's 
western plays. Photography beautiful. 
— A. D. Stanchfield, Rae theatre, Ann 
Arbor, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

He Comes Up Smiling, with Douglas 
Fairbanks. — Usual Fairbanks picture that 
drew fairly well. — J. Henkle Henry, Em- 
pire theatre, Winchester, Va. 

Missing, J. Stuart Blackton production. 
— One of the very best pictures we have 
had in a year. We got many fine com- 
I ments on it. Worth advanced prices. — 
, H. P. Thompson, Liberty theatre, Par- 
| deeville, Wis. — Neighborhood patronage. 

A. Doll's House, with Elsie Ferguson. 
I — Not a drawing card. Drama liked by 
' some. Others wanted action. Indif- 
ferent to theme. — Majestic theatre, Lex- 
ington, Neb. — Small town patronage. 



Rose of the World, with Elsie Fergu- 
son. — Picture fair. Star at her best. Did 
not draw well here. — J. T. Snushall, 
Colonial theatre, Big Rapids, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The Silent Man, with William S. Hart. 
— Fine. Should appeal to any class. 
Business good. — W. H. Ingraham, Rex 
theatre, Fairfax, Okla.— High class pat- 
ronage. 

Little Women, special production. — 
Picture very pleasing. Good for family 




A scene from "A Wild Goose Chase," star- 
ring Hazel Daley. (Triangle.) 



houses. — D. C. Burgum, Garden theatre, 
Des Moines, Iowa. — Down town patron- 
age. 

He Comes Up Smiling, with Douglas 
Fairbanks. — Not Fairbanks' best but 
drew good business and pleased. — Re- 
gent theatre, Cleveland, Miss. — General 
patronage. 

Blue Blazes Rawden, with William S. 
Hart. — Fair. Too many bar scenes. — 
Chas. Dale, Topic theatre, Fairfax, Minn. 

Private Peat, with Private Harold 
Peat. — Played a Sennett Western comedy 
with this and it went over well to good 
business. — Regent theatre, Cleveland, 
Miss. — General patronage. 

The Great Love, a Griffith production. 
— A wonderful picture with good draw- 
ing power. Play up producer. — James J. 
Palmer, Palace theatre, Harrington, 
N. J. — Mixed patronage. 

43 



Private Peat, with Private Harold 
Peat. — The only big thing about this is 
the rental price. No acting. Less plot. 
— P. R. Matson, Crystal theatre, Flan- 
dreau, S. D. 

Bluebird 

That Devil Bateese, with Monroe Salis- 
bury. — Remarkable. Pleased all. If you 
like Northwest stories book it. — C. E. 
Leininger, Grand theatre, East Pales- 
tine, O. — General patronage. 

She Hired a Husband, with Priscilla 
Dean. — Our Saturday crowd liked this 
one. Story won't strain anybody's in- 
tellect. — R. L. Hensen, Bijou theatre, 
Carrollton, 111. 

Beans, with Edith Roberts. — A very 
good program picture. Good story. 
Good comedy drama. — C. E. Leininger, 
Grand theatre, East Palestine, O. — Gen 
eral patronage. 

All Night, with Carmel Myers. — Excel- 
lent. Heard more favorable comment 
on this than was heard on some big 
specials. — R. L. Hensen, Bijou theatre, 
Carrollton, 111. 

Exhibitors Mutual 

The Eleventh Commandment, with 
Lucille Lee Stewart.- — A fine picture for 
box office. — J. Day, Palace theatre, Des 
Moines, la. — Down town patronage. 

Up Romance Road, with William Rus- 
sell. — -Can't hand it much. — E. L. Franck, 
Oasis theatre, Ajo, Ariz. — Border min- 
ing town. 

A Hoosier Romance, with Colleen 
Moore. — Here is a real picture. Some- 
thing that appeals to all. Book it and 
boost it. — C. E. Zink, Alhambra the- 
atre, Knightstown, Ind. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

In Bad, with William Russell. — Very 
good. — Clay H. Powers, Strand theatre, 
Dunsmuir, Cal. — General patronage. 

The Long Lane's Turning, with Henry 
B. Walthall.— Best Walthall I have 
played in some time. — A. L. Picker, Rex 
theatre, Ironwood, Mich. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

First National 

Tarzan of the Apes, with Elmo Lin- 
coln. — A wonderful picture. Pleased 
all.— D. B. Follett, Star theatre, Gibson- 
burg, O. — Middle class patronage. 

Tarzan of the Apes, with Elmo Lin- 
coln. — Good. Don't fail to pet this one. 
— Geo. W. Summer, Dixie theatre, Clay 
Center, Neb. — Small town patronage. 

Empty Pockets, with Bert Lytell.— 
Very good. Pleased my patrons.— D. B. 
Follett, Star theatre. Gibsonburg, O. 
Middle class patronage. 



4 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



The Romance of Tarzan, with Elmo 
Lincoln. — Played this one day and made 
as much as I did with Tarzan of the 
Apes in two. Had I known what I do 
now I would have played both the same 
night in a pretentious manner at 50c 
and pleased my patrons better, saving 
the extra day's expense. — J. Henkle 
Henry, Empire theatre, Winchester, Va. 

A Dog's Life, with Charlie Chaplin. — 
A good comedy. — D. B. Follett, Star 
theatre, Gibsonburg, O. — Middle class 
patronage. 

The Romance of Tarzan, with Elmo 
Lincoln.— Splendid. Good business. 
Pleased everybody. On the historical 
order. Sure to please. — C. E. Zink. 
Alhambra theatre, Knightstown, Ind. — 
Mixed patronage. 

Italy's Flaming Front, topical. — The 
best war picture that I have ever seen. — ■ 
D. B. Follett, Star theatre, Gibsonburg, 
O. — Middle class patronage. 

The Romance of Tarzan, with Elmo 
Lincoln. — The best out to get the busi- 
ness as a followup for Tarzan of the 
Apes. — Geo. W. Summer, Dixie theatre, 
Clay Center, Neb. — Small town patron- 
age. 

Fox 

On the Jump, with George Walsh. — 
Star at his best. Fine support. Drawing 
power good. — J. T. Snushall, Colonial 
theatre, Big Rapids, Mich. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

Under Two Flags, with Thera Bara. — 
Very good reissue. Broke all Wednes- 
day records. — C. E. Leininger, Grand 
theatre, East Palestine, O. — General pat- 
ronage. 

Mr. Logan, U. S. A. — Good picture. 
Star well liked here. — A. Hammerly, 
Lyric theatre, Hamilton, O. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

The She Devil, with Theda Bara.— If 
your patrons like Theda Bara this should 
get the money. It is well produced and 
it pleased the majority. — Regent theatre, 
Cleveland, Miss. — General patronage. 

Queen of the Sea, with Annette Kel- 
lermann. — Cannot call it great or cannot 
knock it. — Roland B. Riggs, Liberty 
theatre, Cheboygan, Mich. — High class 
patronage. 

The Forbidden Path, with Theda Bara. 
— Good picture. Fair business. — A. Ham- 
merly, Lyric theatre, Hamilton, O. — 
Mixed patronage. 

Marriages Are Made, with Peggy Hy- 
land. — Very good picture. Photography 
fine. Well liked by all.— J. T. Snushall, 
Colonial theatre, Big Rapids, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The She Devil, with Theda Bara.— 
Drew well but not the kind we lfke to 
see Theda in. — S. A. Hayman, Lyda 
theatre. Grand Island, Neb. — Down town 
patronage. 

The Broken Law, with William Far- 
num. — If you want a picture that will 
send your patrons out pleased, book it. 
— C. E. Leininger, Grand theatre, East 
Palestine, O. — General patronage. 

I'll Say So, with George Walsh.— It 
gets by on speed and pep alone. Aver- 
age business. — Regent theatre, Cleve- 
land, Miss. — General patronage. 

The Broken Law, with William Far- 
num. — Not as good as his late releases. 
— S. A. Hayman, Lyda theatre, Grand 
Island, Neb. — Down town patronage. 

Fighting Blood, with William Farnum. 
— Great picture. One of the best fights 



I ever saw. — C. E. Leininger, Grand the- 
ater, East Palestine, O. — General patron- 
age. 

The Strange Woman, with Gladys 
Brockwell. — Excellent. Good title but 
did not draw. Star not known here. — 
Regent theatre, Cleveland, Miss. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

Western Blood, with Tom Mix. — Good 
picture. Star fine. This picture has lots 
of pep. — Princess Elwood theatre, El- 
wood, Ind. — General patronage. 

The Man Hunter, with William Far- 
num. — Excellent. Big. A typical Far- 
num picture. — Regent theatre, Cleveland, 
Miss. — General patronage. 

The Woman Who Gave, with Evelyn 
Nesbit. — This is without any exception 
the best picture she has ever made and 
I can truly recommend this picture. — 
Roland B. Riggs, Liberty theatre, Che- 
boygan, Mich. — High class patronage. 

Goldwyn 

A Perfect Lady, with Madge Kennedy. 
■ — -One of the most delightful pictures 
I've ever presented. 100 per cent pure 
enjoyment. — R. L. Hensen, Bijou the- 
atre, Carrolltown, 111. 

The Turn of the Wheel, with Geraldine 
Farrar. — Acting fine. Settings good. 
Story fair. Patron's interest in picture 
lacking. — C. M. Kellogg, Homestake the- 
atre, Lead, S. D. — Mixed patronage. 

Polly of the Circus, with Mae Marsh. 
— This is an old one but they don't make 
them better now. We'll say it is a regu- 
lar feature and if you play it boost it. — 
H. P. Thompson, Liberty theatre, Par- 
deeville, Wis. — Neighborhood patronage. 

A Perfect 36, with Mabel Normand. — 
One of Normand's best. Pleased packed 
houses. — A. S. Widaman, Centennial the- 
atre, Warsaw, Ind. 

Friend Husband, with Madge Ken- 
nedy. — Exceptionally clever production 
throughout. The comedy situations fine. 
Give us more comedy and see the box 
office show better results for all. — C. M. 
Kellogg, Homestake theatre, Lead, S. D. 
— Mixed patronage. 

Joan of Plattsburg, with Mabel Nor- 
mand. — Not as good as some of her 
others, but she usually draws well. — Ben 
L. Morris, Olympic theatre, Bellaire, O. 
— General patronage. 

The Venus Model, with Mabel Nor- 
mand. — Pleased a fair sized audience. — 
A. C. Klug, Empress theatre, Zumbrota, 
Minn. — Rural patronage. 

The Kingdom of Youth, with Madge 
Kennedy. — Extra good. Say, this pic- 
ture pleased our patrons immensely. — 
C. A. Rollins, Wigwam theatre, Sheffield, 
111. — General patronage. 

Day Dreams, with Madge Kennedy. — 
One of Goldwyn's poorest pictures. 
Not up to standard. — Leo F. Keiler, Ar- 
cade theatre, Paducah, Ky. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

Just for Tonight, with Tom Moore. — 
Fine settings and photography. Our 
patrons like star. — C. A. Rollins, Wig- 
wam theatre, Sheffield, 111. — General 
patronage. 

The Racing Strain, with Mae Marsh. 
— An excellent picture. Boost it. — F. E. 
Heller, Strand theatre, Anderson, Ind. — 
High class patronage. 

The Hell Cat, with Geraldine Farrar. 
— A slow moving western that doesn't 
give the star much chance to act. Scene 
in bedroom rather risque. Might be of- 



fensive to some. — R. L. Hensen, Bijou 
theatre, Carrollton, 111.. 

The Service Star, with Madge Ken- 
nedy. — Good picture but not business. — 
A. Hammerly, Lyric theatre, Hamilton, 
O. — Mixed patronage. 

The Beloved Traitor, with Mae Marsh. 
— Liked by most all. They said so. 
Title caused some to look for war stuff. 
I advertised, however, that it was not. — 
Majestic theatre, Lexington, Neb. — 
Small town patronage. 

Laughing Bill Hyde, with Will Rogers. 
— Great picture. Pleased them all. Much 
favorable comment from patrons. — C. A. 
Rollins, Wigwam theatre, Sheffield, 111. 
— General patronage. 

Kleine General 

The Fibbers, with Bryant Washburn. 
— Fair. These do not go well for us. 
All are about the same class. — Clay H. 
Powers, Strand theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. 
— General patronage. 

Men of the Desert, with Jack Gardner. 
—They didn't care for it. — E. L. Franck r 
Oasis theatre, Ajo, Ariz. — Border min- 
ing camp. 

Metro 

Lend Me Your Name, with Harold 
Lockwood. — Good. Drew big crowd. 
Pleased all. — L. A. Hasse, Majestic, the- 
atre, Mauston, Wis. 

The Trail to Yesterday, with Bert 
Lytell. — Fine. Book it. — J. M. Bailey, 
Gem theatre, Waverly, Kans. 

Pay Day, with Mr. and Mrs. Sidney 
Drew. — Poorest Metro I have shown. — 
L. A. Hasse, Majestic theatre, Mauston, 
Wis. 

Hitting the High Spots, with Bert 
Lytell. — A good clean comedy drama. 
This star is getting over here better all 
the time. — A. S. Widaman, Centennial 
theatre, Warsaw, Ind. 

His Bonded Wife, with Emmy Weh- 
len. — Fine program offering. — S. A. 
Hayman, Lyda theatre, Grand Island, 
Neb. — Down town patronage. • 

The Gold Cure, with Viola Dana.— 
Was a pleasure to show this. Every- 
body commented on it. Excellent busi- 
ness. People still laughing over Viola 
Dana's comedy. — Harry L. Kelling, 
Modesto theatre, Modesto, Cal. 

Paramount 

Little Miss Optimist, with Vivian Mar- 
tin. — We advertised Tom Moore and' 
packed them in on this. Some one over- 
looked a good one when they passed' 
Tom over. — Ben L. Morris, Olympic 
theatre, Bellaire, O. — General patronage. 

Castles for Two, with Marie. — Fine 
Play. Star at her best. Picture a little 
too dark. — J. T. Snushall, Colonial the- 
ater, Big Rapids, Mich. 

The Call of the East, with Sessue Hay- 
akawa. — Star pleased well. — Ben L. 
Morris, Olympic theatre, Bellaire, O. — 
General patronage. 

Out of the Shadow, with Pauline Fred- 
erick. — Paramount killed her. Goldwyn 
is the victim. — J. T. Hatch, Wonderland 
theatre, Kaufman, Tex. — Neighborhood 
patronage. 

Bab's Matinee Idol, with Marguerite 
Clark. — Just a good program picture. 
Not so good as Bab's Diary or Burglar 
but will get by. — H. P. Thompson. Lib- 
erty theatre, Pardeeville, Wis. — Neigh- 
borhood patronage. 

The Mystery Girl, with Ethel Clayton.. 



44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



AN EPISODE FROM "THE LIGHTNING RAIDER" 



Wu Fang, the crafty individual at the table, realizes others are in the room. A scene 
from "The Baited Trap," tenth episode of Pearl White's Pathe serial. 




— I consider this the best picture this 
star has appeared in since she has been 
with Paramount. — J. T. Hatch, Wonder- 
land theatre, Kaufman, Tex. — Neighbor- 
hood patronage. 

Let's Get a Divorce, with Billie Burke 
— Very good. Star is pleasing and story 
is very good. — Clay H. Powers, Strand 
Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — General pa- 
tronage. 

Less Than Kin, with Wallace Reid — 
This is a feature that will please all 
classes. — G. A. Duncan, Lyric Theatre, 
Carlisle, Ky. — Good patronage. 

The Cook of Canyon Camp, with 
George Beban — Enjoyed by all. Fine 
picture. Draws well. — J. T. Marshall, 
Colonial Theatre, Big Rapids, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

Huck and Tom, with Jack Pickford — 
Good kid picture. — Clay H. Powers, 
Strand Theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

The Law of the North, with Charles 
Ray — Although the part taken by Ray 
in this production would have been more 
adaptable to W. S. Hart, it gave good 
satisfaction and brought us a splendid 
business. — P. R. Matson, Crystal Thea- 
tre, Flandreau, S. D. — General patron- 
age. 

Jack and Jill, with Jack Pickford— A 
high' class comedy drama. Pleased 
everyone. — W. A. Forsyth, Temple 
Theatre, Standish, Mich. — Small town 
patronage. 

Believe Me, Xantippe, with Wallace 
Reid. — Good picture that drew and 
pleased well. — Clay H. Powers, Strand 
theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — General patron- 
age. 

The Kaiser's Shadow, with Dorothy 
Dalton,— A good German spy picture. 
If your patrons like war or spy pictures 
this is a dandy. — Clay H. Powers, Strand 
theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — General pat- 
ronage. 

Flare-Up Sal, with Dorothy Dalton. — 
Too many rough bar room scenes. — 
Chas. Dale, Topic theatre, Fairfax, Minn. 

The Hired Man, with Charles Ray. — 
Star new here but pleased and drew. 
Splendid picture. — W. H. Ingraham, Rex 
theatre, Fairfax, Okla. — High class pat- 
ronage. 

The Mating of Marcella, with Dorothy 
Dalton. — Women especially liked this 
because of gowns. Men enjoyed the 
story. Has the life of city wealth well 
shown. — Majestic theatre, Lexington, 
Neb. — Small town patronage. 

The Source, with Wallace Reid. — This 
star always draws. Picture very good. 
Business great. — Roland B. Riggs, Lib- 
erty theatre, Cheboygan, Mich. — High 
class patronage. 

Rimrock Jones, with Wallace Reid. — 
Satisfactory story of a lucky prospector. 
No adverse comments. — E. L. Franck, 
Oasis theatre, Ajo, Ariz. — Border min- 
ing Camp. 

Come On In, with Shirley Mason.— 
Satisfactory picture. Drew light busi- 
ness. Star not known. — Regent theatre, 
Cleveland, Miss. — General patronage. 

The Secret Game, with Sessue Haya- 
kawa. — They liked this one. — E. L. 
Franck, Oasis theatre, Ajo, Ariz. — Bor- 
der mining camp. • 

Too Many Millions, with Wallace Reid. 
— It will delight any class audience. A 
good, safe bet. — C. A. Krause, Empress 
theatre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best class of 
patronage. 



Tyrant Fear, with Dorothy Dalton. — ■ 
Very clever picture and will please them 
all. — Roland B. Riggs, Liberty theatre, 
Cheboygan, Mich. — High class patron- 
age. 

The Gypsy Trail, with Bryant Wash- 
burn. — Nothing big about this but drew 
well and seemed to satisfy. — P. R. Mat- 
son, Crystal theatre, Flandreau, S. D. 

String Beans, with Charles Ray. — Not 
as good as Ray's best in rube parts but 
good just the same. — C. A. Krause, Em- 
press theatre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best 
class of patronage. 

Battling Jane, with Dorothy Gish. — 
This picture went over big and pleased 
immensely. — Roland B. Riggs, Liberty 
theatre, Cheboygan, Mich. — High class 
patronage. 

Such a Little Pirate, with Lila Lee. — 
Did not prove much of a drawing card. 
Picture fair. — James J. Palmer, Palace 
theatre, Harrington, N. J. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

In Pursuit of Polly, with Billie Burke. 
— Pleased a large audience. Billie Burke 
always gets us a big business. — P. R. 
Matson, Crystal theatre, Flandreau, 
S. D. 

The Hungry Heart, with Pauline Fred- 
erick. — About 4,500 feet of "foolum" and 
500 feet of star. The only pleasant fea- 
ture connected with it was very light 
business. Cut this one. — W. J. Kerr, 
Star theatre, Southport, Pa. — Small town 
patronage. 

Select 

The Marionettes, with Clara Kimball 
Young. — One of the best Young pictures 
ever played. All pleased. — H. G. Thorpe, 
New Grand theatre, Crosby, Minn. — Min- 
ing town. 

The Son of a Gun, with G. M. Ander- 
son. — A dandy picture that went big, and 
the prices are right on Sherry's Service. 
— William Thatcher, Salinas, Kans. 

Magda, with Clara Kimball Young. — 
Very satisfactory story and drew well 



two days. — Ben L. Morris, Olympic 
theatre, Bellaire, O. — General patronage. 

The Whirlpool, with Alice Brady. — 
Alice Brady has strong drawing power 
here. Good picture. — J. T. Hatch, Won- 
derland theatre, Kaufman, Tex. — Neigh- 
borhood patronage. 

The Forbidden City, with Norma Tal- 
madge. — The best Norma has done yet, 
and that's saying something. — A. S. 
Widaman, Centennial theatre, Warsaw, 
Ind. 

The Claw, with Clara Kimball Young. 
— A good picture, far above the average 
program picture. Splendid business. 
Capacity. — Clay H. Powers, Strand the- 
atre, Dunsmuir, Cal. — General patron- 
age. 

Cecilia of the Pink Roses, with Marion 
Davies. — Wonderful. You can't go wrong 
on this. — Chas. Dale, Topic theatre. Fair- 
fax, Minn. 

The Whirlpool, with Alice Brady. — 
Fine picture. Star good. Support fair. 
— J. T. Snushall, Colonial theatre, Big 
Rapids, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Honeymoon, with Constance Tal- 
madge. — Well liked here, as we have not 
shown ver}' many of this star. Every- 
body does not know her well but her 
next picture will draw better. — Clay H. 
Powers, Strand theatre, Dunsmuir, Cal. 
— General patronage. 

Who Cares, with Constance Talmadge. 
— Good attendance for three days. — D. 
C. Brugum, Garden theatre, Des 
Moines, la. — Downtown patronage. 

The Foolish Virgin, with Clara Kim- 
ball Young. — Good. — Chas. Dale, Topic 
theatre, Fairfax, Minn. 

Poppy, with Norma Talmadge. — Very 
good. Many favorable comments. Large 
house on a slow day. — E. L. Franck, 
Oasis theatre, Ajo, Ariz. — Border min- 
ing camp. 

The Moth, with Norma Talmadge. — 
Fine picture. Was liked better than the 
special we had on the previous day. — 
Mrs. J. M. Gardner, Arc theatre, Delphi, 
Ind. — Small town patronage. 



45 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




HALE HAMILTON 
Is making good in Metro pictures. This 
is a scene from "That's Good." . 

Triangle 

Alias Mary Brown, with Casson Fer- 
guson. — Was well received by our pa- 
trons. Did fair business. — Mrs. J. M. 
Gardner, Arc theatre, Delphi, Ind. — 
Small town patronage. 

Mystic Faces, with Jack Abbe. — Very 
draggy story with a poor plot. Let it 
alone. — H. G. Thorpe, New Grand the- 
atre, Crosby, Minn. — Mining town. 

The Silent Rider, with Roy Stewart.— 
Good western. Star well liked here. — A. 
Hammerly, Lyric theatre, Hamilton, O. 
— Mixed patronage. 

Who Killed Walton, with J. Barney 
Sherry. — A good picture. Triangle are 
sure putting out the pictures. — -Loeffel- 
holz Bros., Auditorium theatre, Cuba 
City, Wis. — Middle class patronage. 

By Proxy, with Roy Stewart. — A good 
western with comedy mixed in. A Red 
Saunders story. — H. G. Thorpe, New 
Grand theatre, Crosby, Minn. — Mining 
town. 

Truthful Tulliver, with William S. 
Hart. — Some picture. One of the best 
Harts I ever ran. Book it. — C. E. Lein- 
inger, Grand theatre, East Palestine, O. 
— General patronage. 

The Pretender, with William Des- 
mond. — Audience well pleased. Good 
comedy and western picture. — Louis G. 
Sewing, Crown theatre, Calumet, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The Devil's Double, with William S. 
Hart. — Went good. William Hart al- 
ways goes good. These reissues are in 
good shape and Triangle's prices are 
right. I do well with Triangle. — William 
Thatcher, Salinas, Kans. 

I Love You, with Alma Rubens. — 
Splendid picture. Everybody well 
pleased. Lots of comments. — L. A. 
Hasse, Majestic theatre, Mauston, Wis. 

The Law of the Great Northwest, with 
Margerv Wilson. — A good, pleasing pic- 
ture. Good photography. — C. E. Lein- 
inger, Grand theatre, East Palestine, O. 
— General patronage. 



The Pretender, with William Des- 
mond. — Here is a picture full of pep 
and punch. Extra good. Book it and 
push it. — A. J. Hill, Glen theatre, Chi- 
cago, 111. — Middle class patronage. 

The Price of Applause, with Jack Liv- 
ingston. — A good war story, but these 
are getting tiresome. — H. G. Thorpe, 
New Grand theatre, Crosby, Minn. — 
Mixed patronage. 

Untamed, with Roy Stewart. — Not up 
to the standard with Stewart but got by. 
— William Thatcher, Salinas, Kans. 

The Golden Fleece, with Joe Bennett. 
— One of the best well-balanced pictures 
from every standpoint. Good business. 
— Mrs. J. M. Gardner, Arc theatre, 
Delphi, Ind. — Small town patronage. 

Wife or Country, with Gloria Swan- 
son. A fairly good plot with some more 
spy mellor. — H. G. Thorpe, New Grand 
theatre, Crosby, Minn. — Mixed patron- 
age. 

Flirting with Fate, with Douglas Fair- 
hanks. — Might have been a good picture 
when new but too much gone. — C. E. 
Leininger, Grand theatre, East Palestine, 
O. — General patronage. 

Universal 

Smashing Through, with Herbert 
Rawlinson. — Very good. Has unusual 
stuntb. — E. L. Franck, Oasis theatre, 
Ajo, Ariz. — Border mining town. 

Vanity Pool, with Mary MacLaren. — 
Had this on stormy day and drew a 
blank. Would call it fair picture, only 
Mary MacLaren has no drawing power 
here.— J. B. Stine, Gem theatre, Clinton, 
Ind. — Mining town. 

Danger, Go Slow, with Mae Murray. 
— Good three ways — title, star and pro- 
duction. Good business. — Regent thea- 
tre, Cleveland, Miss. — General patronage. 

She Hired a Husband, with Priscilla 
Dean. — A knockout. Dean's work is 
different and she's a comer. The title 
gets them in and the picture pleases 
them. — -J. B. Stine, Gem theatre, Clin- 
ton, Ind. — Mining town. 

The Two SouJ Woman, with Priscilla 
Dean. — Good, with good advertising pos- 
sibilities and pleases all when they see 
it. — Ben L. Morris, Olympic theatre, 
Bellaire, O. — General patronage. 

A Woman's Fool, with Harry Carey. 
— Great. This star draws as good as 
Hart. Big business. — A. L. Picker, Rex 
theatre, Ironwood, Mich. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

Vitagraph 

The Desired Woman, with Harry 
Morey. — A very good story. Very appro- 
priate for a Sunday showing. — H. G. 
Thorpe, New Grand theatre, CVosby, 
Minn. — Mining town. 

By the World Forgot, with Hedda 
Nova. — This picture should be the world 
forgot. It's too bad it was ever remem- 
bered. — Mrs. J. M. Gardner, Arc theatre, 
Delphi, Ind. — Small town patronage. 

Over the Top, with Guy Empey. — 
Played two days to good business. Is a 
good drawing card. — H. G. Thorpe, New 
Grand theatre, Crosby, Minn. — Mixed 
patronage. 

A Mother's Sin, with Earle Williams. 
— Very good picture. — Brockhouse & 
Weeks, Electric theatre, Arenzville, 111. 

An American Live Wire, with Earle 
Williams. — Not much of a story to this 



one. — H. G. Thorpe, New Grand theatre, 
Crosby, Minn. — Mining town. 

All Man, with Harry Morey. — A fine 
picture. Best Morey picture we have 
had. Good drawing card. — Mrs. J. M. 
Gardner, Arc theatre, Delphi, Ind. — 
Small town patronage. 

The Wild Strain, with Alfred Whit- 
man. — Just an ordinary story which will 
get by. Whitman is better in westerns. — 
H. G. Thorpe, New Grand theatre, 
Crosby, Minn. — Mining town. 

A Bachelor's Children, with Harry 
Morey. — A splendid picture from start 
to finish. Everyone was well pleased. — < 
Brockhouse and Weeks, Electric theatre, 
Arenzville, 111. — Rural patronage. 

Love Watches, with Corinne Griffith. — 
Not much to this picture. Displeased 
our audience. — Lewis W. Brisco, Prin- 
cess Elwood theatre, Elwood, Ind. — 
General patronage. 

The Dawn of Understanding, with 

Bessie Love. — A very good picture. Fine 
box office value. — A. J. Hill, Glen the- 
atre, Chicago, 111. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

To the Highest Bidder, with Alice 
Joyce. — Something that would please a 
mixed crowd. Well directed. Star good 
here. — W. T. Hayes, Dreamland the- 
atre, Providence, Ky. — Mixed patronage. 

The Seal of Silence, with Earle Wil- 
liams. — Very fine. Good drawing card if 
conditions had not been against us. — 
Mrs. J. M. Gardner, Arc theatre, Delphi, 
Ind. — Small town patronage. 

World 

The Interloper, with Kitty Gordon. — 
Pleased good business. Star grows in 
popularity. Better than her earlier pic- 
tures. — A. D. Stanchfield, Rae theatre, 
Ann Arbor, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

^HiiuiimiiimiitiiiimiM i iiitiinit iiiiiimiiitmiiimi inn 11 mi mi Hiring 

j Coal Miner Acquires 
Fortune in Peanuts; 
Is Now an Exhibitor j 

PITTSBURGH, KANS.— An ex- j 

| ample of thrift, even under handi- j 

| cap, is suggested in the announce- | 

I ment that Teddy Hoffman, for years | 

| a vendor of peanuts at Pittsburgh | 

| street corners, had purchased the | 

| Palace theatre and would soon open | 

I it as a motion picture house. 

Hoffman was dwarfed at birth and | 

| while he is now 31 years old, he is I 

| less than four feet in height and § 

1 weighs less than 90 pounds. He has | 

I had to make his way in life, how- | 

| ever, since his youth. 

Eight years ago he worked in the | 

1 mines and while he couldn't shovel | 

| as much coal as the other miners, | 

| he managed to shovel a little each f 

1 day and save a little money. One { 

1 day he purchased a small peanut | 

1 wagon, and some time later became f 

| Pittsburgh's "peanut king" by own- | 

1 ing four wagons and having the § 

| local peanut-vending business pretty | 

| well cornered. He owns his own f 

I home which he bought since getting | 

1 into the peanut business and he is 1 

| going to spend considerable money j 

| remodeling the theatre, which he will j 

| open about March 7. 

^iiiiniinhiiiiiimiiiiiiitonHiiiMiiiiiimiiihtiiiiMiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiipiitiiinmiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiui.; 



46 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



What Is the Picture's 

Box Office Value? 



Is the film you are running in- your 
theatre a money maker? Pass the 
word on ! Does the picture draw the 
crowds? Tell the exhibitors in the 
other states. They want to book the 
same pictures. Tell them in Exhibi- 
tors Herald and Motography's 
"What the Picture Did for Me" 
department. 

Your box office is the test of 
popularity. Fill in the blank NOW 
and send to Exhibitors Herald and 
Motography, 417 South Dearborn 
street, Chicago. 

Title 

Star 

Producer 



To Him that Hath, with Montagu 
Love. — Very acceptable. Clean. Story 
that our patrons enjoyed. — J. J. Har- 
wood, National theatre, Cleveland, O. — 
Better class patronage. 

Wings of Victory, Official Govern- 
ment. — Best airplane pictures ever 
shown here. Revelation as to progress 
in air work.— W. D. Martin, Badger the- 
ater, Neillsville, Wis. 

Joan of the Woods, with June Elvidge. 
— Miss Elvidge is very good, but she is 
cast in too many types of plays. — B. H. 
Sink, Pastime theatre, Areenville, O. — 
High class patronage. 

The Golden Wall, with Carlyle Black- 
well. — Good production. Play very well 
laid. — Joyland theatre, Ozark, Ark. — 
Mixed patronage. 

Joan of the Weeds, with June Elvidge. 
—Pleased big business. — A. D. Stanch- 
field, Rae theatre, Ann Arbor, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

Specials and States Rights 

Staking His Life, with William S. 
Hart. — Good, but we have run others 
with more pep. — Loeffelholz Bros., Audi- 
torium theatre, Cuba City, Wis. — Middle 
class patronage. 

Wild Honey, with Doris Kenyon. — 
Dandy picture. Went big, business fair. 
A picture that will please all. — William 
Thatcher, Salina, Kans. 

Staking His Life, with William S. 
Hart. — Fine picture. Scenery perfect. 
Patrons well pleased. — L. A. Hasse, Ma- 
jestic theatre, Mauston, Wis. 

The Spreading Evil, with James Keane. 
— Not the questionable picture as one 
would suppose. After having local cen- 
sor board review same we got fine busi- 
ness at a 25c scale. Played same one 
day on sharing basis. — J. Henkle Henry, 
Empire theatre, Winchester, Va. 

Carmen of the Klondike, with Clara 
Williams. — Very good picture. Won- 
derful fight scene. — A. Bartell, Juneau 
theatre, Milwaukee, Wis. — Neighbor- 
hood patronage. 

Her Fighting Chance, with Jane Grey. 
— Never saw star in pictures before. 
Good picture but no cast. — J. T. Hatch, 
Wonderful theatre, Kaufman, Tex. — 
Neighborhood patronage. 

Mickey, with Mabel Normand. — Three 
days' engagement to a holdout every 
night. House seats 1,200 people. Busi- 
ness absolutely remarkable. Playing 
return engagement. — A. Bartell, Juneau 
theatre, Milwaukee, Wis. — Neighborhood 
patronage. 

Hearts of the World, a Griffith produc- 
tion. — In a class by itself. Capacity at 
a dollar top. — E. L. Franck, Oasis the- 
atre, Ajo, Ariz. — Border mining camp. 

Mickey, with Mabel Normand. — 
Played repeat after three houses to turn 
away business. Playing return date. — 
Rainbow theatre, Milwaukee, Wis. — 
Neighborhood patronage. 

Wanted for Murder, with Elaine Ham- 
merstein. — Very good advertising from 
title. Pleased all, although they are get- 
ting tired of war films. — H. G. Thorpe, 
New Grand theatre, Crosby, Minn. — 
Mining town. 

The Great White Trail, with Doris 
Kenyon. — Personally thought it was 
poor, but the house liked it, so I have no 
kick coming. — E. L. Franck, Oasis the- 
atre, Ajo, Ariz. — Border mining camp. 



Series and Serials 

The Fight for Millions (Vitagraph) — 
If you want a real serial book it. — Pic- 
torium theatre, Dennison, Ohio. 

Hands Up, with Ruth Roland (Pathe) 
— Broke all records for serials. Am re- 
peating it to big business. — Paul Zerilla, 
Grand Theatre, Memphis, Tenn. 

Lure of the Circus, with Eddie Polo 
(Universal) — One of the most interest- 
ing we have shown. A money getter. — 
J. S. Welsh, Star theatre, Shreveport, 
La. — Colored patronage. 

The Lure of the Circus (Universal). — 
Broke all records. Could not accommo- 
date the people. — Lewis Brisco, Princess 
theatre, Elwood, Ind. — General patron- 
age. 

Hands Up, with Ruth Roland (Pathe). 
Going big. Strong drawing power. Lots 
of "pep." — W. T. Hayes, Dreamland 
theatre, Providence, Ky. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

A Fight for Millions, with William 
Duncan (Vitagraph). — Very good and 
business is increasing right along. — -Gem 
theatre, Peoria, 111. — Middle class neigh- 
borhood. 

Hands Up (Pathe). — This is worth 
while. Made us money. — Anton Gilles, 
Grand theatre, Breckenridge, Minn. — All 
class patronage. 

Allied War Review (Pathe).— These 
pictures are fine, but rental is too high 
for small town. — A. R. Bird, Opera 
House, Arlington, la. 

A Fight for Millions, with William 
Duncan (Vitagraph). — Fell off 50 per 
cent, but "flu" is the cause. — Lewis 
Brisco, Princess theatre, Elwood, Ind. 
— General patronage. 

Hands Up, with Ruth Roland (Pathe) 
— Everybody delighted. Nothing but 
praise. Best serial yet. — Princess the- 
atre, Elwood, Ind. 

The Fighting Trail, with William Dun- 
can (Vitagraph). — If you want to run 
a serial, book this. It's great. — A. R. 
Bird, Opera House, Arlington, la. 

The Lure of the Circus, with Eddie 
Polo (Universal). — Biggest drawing se- 
rial of them all. Advertise it big and it 
will go over big. Thrilling action and 
good story. Eddie Polo a favorite here. 
Charged 5 and 10 cents. — J. B. Stine, 
Gem theatre, Clinton, Ind. — Mining 
town. 

Hands Up, with Ruth Roland— Still 
holding its own. The best serial we 
have had. — Loeffholz Bros., Auditorium 
Theatre, Cuba City, Wis. — Middle class 
patronage. 

The Iron Test, with Antonio Moreno 
— My best day is serial day, and I run 
good pictures all the time, too. This 
serial is holding up fine. — Mrs. Lon Ba- 
con, Pastime Theatre, Itasca, Tex. — 
Small town patronage. 

Hands Up, with Ruth Roland (Pathe) 
— Best serial I have ever shown. Capac- 
ity business. Wish it were twenty epi- 
sodes. — P. L. Begnaud, Lee theatre, 
Breaux Bridge, La. — Family patronage. 

The Lightning Raider, with Pearl 
White — A sure-fire hit and the best serial 
I ever played. — A. S. Widaman, Centen- 
nial Theatre, Warsau, Ind. 

Hands Up, with Ruth Roland— Best 
Western serial we ever ran. Book it. 
A sure money-getter. — Ludke Sisters, 
Columbia Theatre, Keno, Wis. 



Weather 

How Advertised. 

Competition 

Admission Prices 
Remarks 



Name of Theatre^ 

Transient or Neighborhood Patron- 
age 

Title 

Star 

Producer 

Weather 

How Advertised 

Competition 

Admission Prices 

Remarks 



City and State 
Sent in by . . . . 



47 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



About as Popular 
As Smallpox — 

The Omaha Chamber of 
Commerce, Omaha Hotel 
Men's association, Omaha 
Manufacturers' association and 
the Omaha Clearing House are 
on record as opposed House 
Roll 355, which provides cen- 
sorship over motion pictures 
in Nebraska. The general 
opinion of the members of the 
association was that the bill, 
aimed at the motion picture 
industry, is radical and oppres- 
sive. 



Fourth-Glass Packages 

Must Be Clear of Marks 

WASHINGTON, D. C— When you 
ship motion picture films and other 
fourth-class matter through the mails be 
sure that the cartons, boxes and other 
containers do not bear any cancelled 
postage, special delivery or revenue 
stamps. These must be removed. The 
Postoffice Department has instructed 
postmasters not to accept such packages. 
Postmasters already have been instructed 
to see that old sWdress labels or tags are 
removed from reused containers. 



Mygatt Joins Hodkinson 

Gerald Mygatt, recently discharged 
from the army, has joined the W. W. 
Hodkinson corporation as director of 
advertising and publicity. Before enlist- 
ing in the Regular Army early in the 
war as a private and advancing to the 
rank of Captain, Mr. Mygatt was promo- 
tion manager for Good Housekeeping 
Magazine and Leslie's Weekly. 



New Cleveland Theatre 

CLEVELAND, OHIO.— The west 
side market house district in the vicinity 
of W. 25th street and Lorain avenue is 
scheduled to have a new motion picture 
theatre, costing approximately $150,000. 
It will be known as the Rialto. 



Find Wild Locations 

Two of Paramount's new pictures are 
being screened in the "wilds.'' Near 
Tucson "Hearts and Horsethieves," star- 
ring Lila Lee, is being made. "The Val- 
ley of the Giants," starring Wallace 
Reid, is being filmed in northern Califor- 
nia. 



Complete Holmes Comedy 

With "Taxi," a comedy starring Tay- 
lor Holmes, completed, Director Law- 
rence Windom has started work on 
"Upside Down," the comedian's next 
picture, a screen adaptation of George 
Agnew Chamberlain's Harper's Maga- 
zine story, "Lovely Reason." 



Fire Damages Theatre 

GARY, IND.— Fifteen minutes after 
the Eagle Theatre had been emptied of 
its evening crowd a fire broke out which 
resulted in $1,100 damages. 



Neal Hart Returns 
To Screen Through 
Independent Market 

Neal Hart, the Westerner, who will 
be remembered by exhibitors and fans 
for his work in "The Border Wolves," 
"Love's Lariat," and "The Lion's 
Claws," and numerous other subjects, 
returns again to the screen, this time 
through the medium of the independent 
market, having placed his attraction with 
the Arrow Film Corporation for distri- 
bution. 

Hart's present vehicle, which will in- 
troduce his return again to the screen is 
being produced under the working title 
of "Love's Round Up," but this title will 
likely be changed before the picture 
reaches the buyers. 

It is expected that the picture will be 
ready for state rights buyers by April 
1, and immediately upon its completion 
Hart will again leave for the cattle coun- 
try in Wyoming to produce another big 
story he has just secured. 




Neal Hart 



"My reason for placing my pictures on 
the Independent Market through Arrow 
is that the tendency of the Independent 
producer seems to be leaning to the 
state right market rather than the sale 
of the negative outright," stated Mr. 
Hart. "By encouraging the state right 
man a good market is insured for the 
producer of special attractions." 

The Export & Import Company has 
already contracted for the foreign rights 
on the first Neal Hart picture and the 
Eastern Feature Film Company of Bos- 
ton has purchased the New England 
rights. 



Mutual Trade Showing 

The Exhibitors Mutual Distributing 
Corporation have arranged to hold a 
weekly exhibition of current pictures for 
the benefit of the trade and press and 
will stage a picture every Monday after- 
noon in Wurlitzer Hall, 120 West 41st 
Street, New York. All exhibitors are 
invited to these showings. 



Parsons May Conduct 
His Comedy Company 
On Trip Around World 

William H. ("Smiling Bill") Parsons, 
president of the National Film Corpora- 
tion of America and star in and creator 
of Capitol Comedies, proposes to take his 
comedy company on a picture-making 
tour of the world, visiting every country 
that makes more than a spot on the map 
and making a CapitoL Comedy in each. 

Mr. Parsons has under consideration 
a suggestion that the locale of the 
comedy to be made in Holland be Ame- 
rongen, where William Hohenzollern is 
a guest. Smiling Bill thinks a comedy 
with Scowling Bill at the business end 
of a slapstick ought to be a great hit in 
the civilized countries of the world and 
expresses the belief that even the Ger- 
man Bolsheviki might find a laugh or 
two in it. 

Parsons is quite serious about his pro- 
posed world tour. He believes it would 
be made a unique cinema record of com- 
edy manners and customs in other coun- 
tries. 



Harrisburg House Sold 

HARRISBURG, PA. — The Stanley 
Booking Corporation of Philadelphia, 
which owns a string of theatres in the 
state, has purchased the Victoria The- 
atre here and will take possession May 4. 
James A. George will be retained as 
manager. 



Pictures in Schools 

SYRACUSE, N. Y.— The next big in- 
novation in the school system of this 
city will be the installation of motion 
picture machines and the use of them 
generally in the study courses of prac- 
tically all of the classes. 



Brunet Has Anniversary 

Paul Brunet, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of Pathe, completed his 
first year as the directing genius for 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., March 7. Em- 
ployes of the home office presented him 
with a handsome Tiffany silver cigar and 
cigaret humidor as a reminder. 



K. & B. Paint Offices 

The Kessel and Baumann offices in 
the Longacre building, New York, have 
just been refurnished and re-decorated. 
Ad. Kessel, always having an eye to 
beauty, has spared no expense in making 
his offices, not only the most comfort- 
able, but among the most sumptuous in 
the city. 



Ince Signs De Grasse 

Joseph DeGrasse, motion picture di- 
rector, whose screen career dates back 
to 1909, has been engaged by Thomas 
H. Ince and is now directing Dorothy 
Dalton in her new picture, which, writ- 
ten by John Lynch and scenarioized by 
C. Gardner Sullivan, is as yet untitled. 



Lewises in Hawaii 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Lewis are now in 
the Hawaiian and Phillipine Islands. 



48 




CA N7i D MNWFI LM N EWS 



Ottawa Manager Uses 
Horse Race to Boost 
"The Master Mystery" 

Manager Archie Laurie of the Strand 
Theatre, Ottawa, put over a neat stunt 
on the occasion of the presentation of 
the first episode of "The Master Mys- 
tery." Laurie seized the opportunity to 
secure considerable publicity by reason 
of the fact that a horse named "H.ou- 
dini" won a race at New Orleans on the 
first day of the run, Monday, March 10. 
The horse was a 10 to 1 shot, which 
fact made the boost more interesting. 
He got into touch with the sporting ed- 
itor of The Ottaiva Journal, who readily 
consented to feature the winning of this 
horse in the report of the races. The 
newspaperman also referred to the horse 
as "The Master Mystery" and then used 
a portion of his comment column to tell 
how a local race track devotee had 
cleaned up a pile of money by noting 
that Houdini was being featured at the 
local theatre on the same date as the 
horse was scheduled to run at Jefferson 
Park track down South. As a result of 
this publicity, all the sport followers 
around town were talking about the 
hunch which the Strand Theatre had 
provided. 

Laurie clipped the race report and the 
sport comment from the paper and 
placed them in a large frame in the the- 
atre lobby. 



SHIPMAN-CURWOOD CO. 
SEEKING LOCATIONS 

A number of prominent men of Cal- 
gary, Alberta, including several members 
of Parliament, have subscribed to stock 
in the new Canadian Photoplays, Lim- 
ited, of Calgary, the authorized capital- 
ization of which is $250,000. The new 
company has entered into an agreement 
with the Shipman-Curwood Company to 
produce the stories of James Oliver 
Curwood and Director David Hartford 
is already seeking locations at Lesser 
Slave Lake for the first release, "Wapi, 
the Walrus," which is booked to be pre- 
sented at the Grand Theatre, Calgary, 
on June 5. 

Nell Shipman, the leading actress of 
the new company, is already on the 
ground and made personal appearances 
at the Regent Theatre, Calgary, for one 
week. One of her pictures, "God's 
Country and the Woman," plaved to 
packed houses at the Regent Theatre 
during one whole week. The company 
proposes to sell the U. S. and foreign 
rights to its releases on a profit-sharing 
basis, but will retain exclusive control of 
the Canadian rights. 




Soi'ne from "Miss Dulcie from Dixie," with 
Gladys Leslie. (Vitagraph.) 

Busy Publicity Man 

Turns Out 80 Ads 

Walter Greene, Toronto publicity 
manager for Messrs. Jule and J. J. Allen, 
the Canadian theatrical and exchange 
men, recently put in the busiest week of 
his life. For the Toronto newspapers 
alone he wrote no less than eighty dif- 
ferent advertisements and reading no- 
tices. This work included an advertis- 
ing campaign for the special English 
picture, "The Inter-Allied Boxing Tour- 
nament," consisting of views of the 
military and naval bouts at Albert Hall, 
London. The Aliens had secured the 
Canadian rights to these pictures and 
the first Canadian run was at Massey 
Hall, Toronto, during the week of 
March 10. 

Greene also wrote the advertisements 
and readers for the Allen Theatre, the 
new Allen-Bloor theatre, which opened 
on March 10, and for the projected Allen 
St. Clair Theatre. He also looked after 
several details in connection with adver- 
tising for the Allen Royal Theatre. 

Eight hundred convalescent soldiers 
from various military hospitals in To- 
ronto were the guests of the Aliens at 
the opening performance of the "Boxing 
Tournament" feature. This picture at- 
tracted wide attention. 



Amusement Tax Stands 

Hon. Mr. McGarry, provincial treas- 
urer for Ontario, has intimated that 
there is no intention of abolishing the 
amusement ticket tax for the present. 
He explained that the tax was not a 
war measure and that the revenue would 
be needed by the province for some time 
to come. 



Exhibitors Pleased 
Over Lifting of Ban 
Governing Children 
Broad -Minded Measure Pro- 
vides Separate Classifi- 
cation for Films 

Hon. Walter Mitchell, provincial sec- 
retary for Quebec, sprang a pleasant sur- 
prise on exhibitors of the province when 
he put through a measure providing for 
a separate classification by the censors 
of Quebec of all pictures suitable for 
children and also giving the exhibitors 
the privilege of permitting the admis- 
sion of all children without guardians or 
parents to theatres where such pictures 
are being shown. 

Mr. Mitchell introduced this measure 
in place of a promised bill which had 
for its purpose the total exclusion of 
children from all moving picture the- 
atres at all times and under all circum- 
stances. It is understood that he had 
considered such a move at the request 
of the moral reformers, but in place of 
following their wishes he adopted a far 
more broad-minded policy. 

Raise Age Limit 

Another clause of the new law raises 
the age limit for children attending the 
moving picture theatres unattended from 
15 to 16 years when pictures other than 
those for children are on the bill. 

Instructions for the Quebec Board of 
Censors are included in the measure for 
labeling of all pictures which are con- 
sidered suitable for children. The way 
is paved for special children's shows 
and it is the first time in Canada that 
such have been legalized. The pro- 
grams for the children's performances 
will have to be announced as such and 
penalties are provided for exhibitors who 
present other than children's pictures at 
these shows. 

Children's Subjects 

Considerable leeway is promised in 
the selection of subjects for the children. 
Tt is understood that educationals. 
scenics, comedies, patriotic releases, 
topical weeklies, certain dramas as well 
as official government pictures, will be 
passed for presentation at these special 
shows. 

Hon. Mr. Mitchell explained in the 
House that it was recognized that there 
was much of an educational nature for 
children at the moving picture theatres. 



The Oakwood Theatre, the large subur- 
ban Toronto house, holds matinees on 
two days of the week. Wednesday and 
Saturday. At each afternoon perform- 
ance special pictures are presented to 
attract the children. At the mid week 
show the theatre has been presenting 
"Boy Scouts to the Rescue." At the 
Saturday matinee the added picture is 
" The Lure of the Circus" serial. 



The Same Policy In New Form-Independent And Dependable Reviews 



49 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



A. M. Wilbur Honored 

A. M. Wilbur, manager of the Vita- 
graph exchange at Winnipeg, was 
elected president of the Manitoba Asso- 
ciation of Film Exchange Managers at 
the annual meeting of the association 
on Monday, March 10. J. A. Wilson, 
manager of the local Universal office, 
was selected for the office of vice-presi- 
dent, and W. S. Jones, representing the 
First National Exhibitors' Circuit at 
Winnipeg, was re-elected to the post of 
secretary-treasurer. 

j CANADIAN BRIEFS 

The premises of the Specialty Film 
Import, Limited, at Toronto, were 
threatened by fire on March 8, when two 
lower floors of the building at 56 King 
street West, Toronto, were swept by 
flames. The fire did not reach the Spe- 
cialty offices or vault, however. The 
Specialty company is the Canadian 
Pathe distributor. 

Carl H. Pierce, special representative 
of the Famous Players-Lasky Company, 
was a visitor in Ottawa, the Canadian 
capital, and Toronto, the Ontario cap- 
ital, around March 10. He visited a 
number of exchanges and theatres and 
investigated conditions generally. 

The Manitoba legislature, at its ses- 
sion on March 11, received a bill to 
amend the Amusements Taxation Act, 
which has for its purpose the abolition 
of the theatre seat tax, thereby depriv- 
ing the province of from $12,000 to $15,- 
000 annually. The bill was given its sec- 
ond reading. 

Jule and J. J. Allen of Toronto have 
acquired the Canadian rights to "The 
Unpardonable Sin." 



Grace Darmond Joins 

Wallace Reid's Cast 

Grace Darmond, who appeared in 
many Vitagraph pictures opposite Earl 
Williams, will be included in the cast 
supporting Wallace Reid in "The Valley 
of the Giants," according to announce- 
ment from Paramount. 

Kay Laurel of Zeigfeld's Follies will 
also appear in the picture. The story 
originally appeared in The Red Book. 
The picture will not be published for 
some time. 



To Write For Tom Mix 

Richard Schayer, scenario writer and 
well known New York and Chicago 
newspaper man, has been assigned by 
Fox as a special scenario writer for Tom 
Mix. It will be Schayer's duty not only 
to write scenarios for Mix, but also to 
convert into scenario form many of the 
most dramatic incidents in Mix's career. 



Another Hart Ready 

William S. Hart has finished work on 
"The Money Corral," his new Artcraft 
picture, a western. 



I Universal Buys 

Bayard Veiller 

Story for Dean | 

Substantiating its recent state- | 

| ment that during 1919 it would pro- | 

| vide its stars with the best stories 1 

I possible to obtain, Universal has | 

| secured a vehicle for Priscilla 1 

f Dean, written by Bavard Veiller. 1 

I The title of the Veiller story has j 

1 not as yet been made public, but } 

\ it is known that the action of the j 

| drama develops around a maie and § 

| female crook who find trying to | 

I live an honest life more difficult I 

f than they expected it would be. 

Bayard Veiller is known as one f 

i of the most successful playwrights f 

1 of the past decade, his "Within the j 

| Law" and "Thirteenth Chair" prov- } 

| ing among the biggest stage hits { 

| in recent years. Mr. Veiller, j 

1 though the author of several stage | 

I plays, has not heretofore written I 

| directly for the cinema, and the f 

| story Universal has obtained for I 

| Miss Dean's next vehicle is the | 

| first Mr. Veiller has submitted to I 

| film producers direct. 

Miss Dean, now at work on a | 

| new drama tentatively entitled 1 

| "Raggedy Ann," at Universal City, | 

| under the direction of Tod Brown- | 

J ing, will begin work on the Veiller 1 

1 film-play within a few weeks, it is 1 

1 expected. Who will direct Miss 1 

I Dean in the Veiller drama, or who I 

| will be in her supporting cast, are 1 

| details as yet undecided. 



Rob St. Louis Exhibitor 

ST. LOUIS, MO.— John James, man- 
ager of motion picture theatres at 2110 
and 2351 Market street, was held up and 
robbed of a suit case containing $320, the 
receipts of his theatres. 



Hamilton as Haberdasher 

Hale Hamilton plays the role of a 
small town haberdasher in "That's 
Good," his newest starring vehicle, now 
under production at the new Metro stu- 
dios in Hollywood, with Harry L. Frank- 
lin directing. 



Expect-Exhibitors to 

Meet Revenue Lost by 
National Prohibition 

CLEVELAND, O.— "Putting more 
teeth in the Ohio film censorship law" 
might be the title of a little drama con- 
cerning the introduction in the state 
senate of an amendment to the present 
law, whereby all posters and slides are 
to be censored, and giving the censors 
powers to employ assistants. 

The amendment was introduced by 
Senator Bebee of Mt. Gilead, and it 
caused an uproar among the folks of 
the film industry in Cleveland. Imme- 
diately a special meeting of all exchanges 
was called and vigorous opposition was 
developed. Home offices were notified 
and an exchange manager was sent to 
Columbus to lobby against the bill. 

The purpose of the amendment, ac- 
cording to politicians, is to raise addi- 
tional revenue as one of the means of 
offsetting the loss that will occur when 
the state goes dry. A charge of 50 
cents for each slide is provided and 25 
cents for each poster censored. 

The newspapers also devoted consid- 
erable space in condemnation of the idea, 
one paper saying: 

"We suppose if we call up a theatre 
and ask the manager to put a slide on 
the screen calling our doctor, we will 
have to suffer and die while the manager 
sends the slide to Columbus to get it 
censored." 

From information at hand, when the 
exchange men held their meeting, there 
was no evidence that the members of 
the censor board instigated the amend- 
ment, although they recently asked for 
substantial increases in salaries. 



Farnum as Man Hunter 

Declared to be one of the bigest and 
strongest pictures yet produced for Wil- 
liam Farnum, "The Man Hunter," has 
been published as a William Fox Stan- 
dard Picture. It is described as a story 
of hypocrisy and the sea. and is said to 
give the star a role which displays his 
acting ability at its best. 



New Comedies in April 

Some time in April, Vitagraph will in- 
augurate its new Larry Semon comedy 
service. The comedies will be published 
once a month and will be directed by 
the star himself. 



16 Pictures in 18 Months 

Edward Burns, who plays the leading 
role • in Ashley Miller's production, 
"Made in America" for distribution by 
the W. W. Hodkinson Corporation, has 
been in moving pictures just eighteen 
months and in that time has made six- 
teen pictures. Mr. Burns has had no 
previous stage experience. 



Kerrigan Breaks Record 

Carlos E. Moore, representative for 
the W. W. Hodkinson Corporation in 
Pittsburgh, reports that "The Drifters," 
starring J. Warren Kerrigan, the J. D. 
Hampton star, broke all house records 
at the Lyric Theatre, where it played 
first run for two days. 



John J. Murray, owner of the Opera 
House, Warren, Ohio, has just installed 
new equipment in his booth, purchasing 
Powers 6-B from the Cleveland branch 
of the U. T. E. 



The Alhambra Theatre, Cleveland, has 
booked Universal's new serial, "The Red 
Glove." It is a first run house, 1.500 
seats, and catering to a high class trade. 



A. J. Paul, of the Royal Theatre, Ga- 
lion, Ohio, has purchased from the 
Cleveland U. T. E. complete new Powers 
equipment and will make several other 
improvements about the theatre. 



Edwin S. Porter, president of the Sim- 
plex, was in Cleveland last week, arrang- 
ing for the installation, through the 
Argus Theatre Supply Division, of com- 
plete and up-to-date Simplex equipment 
in the new Euclid Theatre. 



50 




CHICAGO TRADE EVENTS 




Floyd Brockell and Clyde Elliott 

Open New Exchange in Chicago 

Organize the Greater Stars Productions, Inc. — 
Will Handle George Beban's New Feature 



Information of considerable interest 
in motion picture circles and particu- 
larly in the Chicago territory is con- 
tained in the announcement of the 
organization of the Greater Stars Pro- 
ductions, Inc. Its managers will be Floyd 
Brockell and Clyde Elliott, both well 
known in Chicago and national film 
circles, and the company's first feature 
will be Hiram Abram's new George 
Beban special production, "Hearts of 
Men." 

Mr. Brockell and Mr. Elliott will open 
temporary offices in the Consumers 
building, April 1, and from there will dis- 
tribute the Beban picture and other pro- 
ductions featuring stars of like magni- 
tude. 

Mr. Brockell for three years was man- 
ager of the Chicago branch of Para- 
mount-Artcraft and is leaving the man- 
agement of Seattle office of Goldwyn to 
join Elliott in the new venture. Elliott, 
who for two years was sales manager 
of the Paramount-Artcraft offices, Chi- 
cago, is leaving a post as special ;epre- 
sentative on the Pacific Coast for Select. 

The new organization will operate on 



Jones-Linick-Schaefer 

Houses Book Cannibals 

Jones, Linick & Schaefer of Chicago 
have booked Martin Johnson's "Canni- 
bals of the South Seas" and will open it 
at the Randolph Theatre for an indefi- 
nite run, to begin shortly. One' of the 
biggest advertising campaigns that ever 
accompanied the showing of any pic- 
ture in Chicago has been arranged. Sup- 
plementing an unusual newspaper adver- 
tising campaign, more than 200 twenty- 
four sheet stands will be scattered 
throughout the city. 

The Randolph is the newest and finest 
of the Jones, Linick & Schaefer string 
of motion picture houses and is located 
in Randolph, near State street. 

"Cannibals of the South Seas" have 
not been shown publicly in Chicago as 
yet. In fact, they have been seen here 
but once, on the occasion when Martin 
Tohnson was the guest of the Hamilton 
Club. 



Fielder in Chicago 

E. C. Fielder, former Cleveland man- 
ager for Hodkinson, has come to Chi- 
cago to manage the Chicago office for 
"W. W." He entered the film business 
in Cleveland several years ago, going 
with World as a salesman. When Hod- 
kinson opened a Cleveland office a year 
ago, Fielder was picked to take charge. 
He made good. His promotion is the 
sequel. 



the state rights, basis, both of its man- 
agers believing the trend of the ex- 
change business is rapidly swinging in 
that direction. They believe exhibitors 
should enjoy the privilege of booking big 
stars and productions without having to 
contract for mediocre subjects to get 
them and that their connections and 
knowledge of the film business will 
enable them to keep their patrons sup- 
plied with the very best pictures featur- 
ing only stars whose reputations and 
drawing power are of proven box office 
value. 

Their first offering, the world rights 
to which have been acquired by Hiram 
Abrams, Messrs. Brockell and Elliott 
assert is the best thing George Beban 
has ever done. He has been working 
on it for seven months. The photoplay 
represents the actor's own efforts, money 
and time, he having produced it him- 
self as an experiment after retiring from 
the Lasky galaxy of luminaries. 

Both Elliott and Brockell have many 
exhibitor friends in the Chicago terri- 
tory and judging from past achieve- 
ments thej' should soon have one of the 
most prosperous exchanges in Chicago. 



Little Mary is Better 

Little Mary McAllister, who formerly 
played jifvenile roles with the Essanay 
company, has just recovered from a seri- 
ous attack of bronchial pneumonia. 




Censors Bar Title 

But Film Draws Big 

Harry Miller, manager of the 
Alcazar Theatre, demonstrated that 
he could put over a picture with- 
out advertising its title last week. 
Through an order of the Chicago 
censorship board, Mr. Miller was 
not allowed to display the title of 
Theda Bara's latest Fox produc- 
tion, "When Men Desire," either 
upon the screen or in the lobby of 
his theatre. Hence he placed a 
placard across the front of his 
house reading: "The Chicago Board 
of Censors will not allow the title 
of this latest Theda Bara produc- 
tion to be advertised," and packed 
them in. Mr. Miller also used the 
same announcement in his ads. 



Exhibitors Mutual 

Manager to Entertain 

Max Levey, manager of the Exhibitors 
Mutual Exchange is preparing an 
elaborate reception for Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin Johnson next Tuesday afternoon. 
Mr. Johnson and his wife will stop off 
in Chicago on their way back to the 
South Seas, to view the final installment 
of his Cannibal pictures, which opens at 
the Randolph theatre March 23. 

A luncheon for Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, 
members of the trade press and repre- 
sentatives of the daily newspapers is 
being arranged by Mr. Levey for Tues- 
day noon. 



Figure Seven Is Lucky 

One for R. C. Cropper 

R. C. Cropper, manager of the Bee 
Hive Exchange, has adopted the number 
"7" as his lucky one. He has seven let- 
ters in his name and is now exploiting 
"The Lucky Seven." His campaign 
started March 7 and he had signed up 
seven exhibitors before 7 p. m. The 
first exhibitors booked the features for 
seven weeks. 



Screen vs. Stage Plays 

Chicagoians are enjoying the novel ex- 
perience of seeing two screen plays being 
produced simultaneously upon the speak- 
ing stage. "The Better 'Ole," which 
opened a week's engagement at the Rose 
Theatre on Madison street, is opposition 
to the musical production at the Illinois 
Theatre, and "Scandal," which is draw- 
ing large crowds at the Garrick Theatre, 
has opposition upon the screen at the 
Star Theatre. 



E. C. I'IKI.Dl'.U. 
\\ ho haa been made Chicago manager for 
IIk- HoilkhiKuii Corp. 



Chicago Cadets in Film 

The first high school boys to get army 
uniforms are shown in pictures from Chi- 
cago by International News Weekly. 
They are from Lane Technical high 
school. 



51 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



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I CHICAGO NOTES ] 

By J. S. MacH 

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Again we face the handsome Pat Dil- 
lon. He is now affiliated with the local 
Pathe branch. And lest we forget, have 
you all been up there recently. Makes a 
chap believe spring is now with us with 
so many cute girlies flying about there. 

So Jack Chadkin climbs aboard the 
"wagon" July 1. What's the number of 
the year this is to take place. Nix Jack, 
watch your vote in April — we need 'em 
all. 

Phil Solomon is off fillums for life, so 
quoteth rumor. Still he is plying mighty 
hard with that Prudential "life" gossip 
the trade are listening to around about 
the Consumers building. 

A recent notice sent to all local ex- 
changes within the Loop, that they must 
vacate present locations by April 30, 
1920, did not even cause a stir. The big 
question is: "Where do we go from 
here ?" 

Another epochal move in filmdom has 
been recorded. That famous team, Ap- 
pelbaum & Kahn, have just completed 
arrangements announcing the greatest 
film "pick-up" service ever attempted. 
How many customers? Steady. Time 
is a .miracle worker. Besides, after 
slanting this, A. & K. will be sitting 
pretty as long as they care to become 
identified with their history-making ven- 
ture. 

Who is that shirt that is seen buzzing 
about the Bee Hive? Nix, Eddie, that is 
the big brother of Billy West and it is 
duly protected by copyright. 

So Louis Marks of the Marshall 
Square went and did it. Yep, the fur is 
off the collar and it looks like a full 
grown Bennie. Bravo,' Louis. Real re- 
construction we'd mutter. 

It looks as though Chick Evans, the 
golf champ, will soon hunt another ath- 
letic pastime. They say R. C. Seery has 
been discovered playing "cow pasture 
billiards" and that his brassie shots de- 
note positive direction. Another live 
lead for dealers in remade golf balls. 

Guess spring is really here. George 
Moore of the Orpheum is taking down 
the storm doors and Sig. "ACE" Fauler 
is all dolled up in his new light sartorial 
ideas. 

R. C. Cropper, manager of the local 
Bee Hive, just returned from his Broad- 
way trip with a flock of honey, 'tis whis- 
pered. 

Hayes & Orr of the Amalgamated 
Film Service solved a difficult problem. 
A recent visitor after gazing about their 
shipping department (Ahem) remarked: 
"It must take a heap of money to main- 
tain a film exchange." Not at all, just 
rent any vacant office and press the but- 
ton and old Sam Instill will deliver with 
gobs of illumination. For at least a few 
months, anyway. 

George E. Luxton, special representa- 



tive for the Rialto Theatre Supply Com- 
pany of Minneapolis, Minn., passed 
through the city enroute for gay Man- 
hattan with a trunk full of live wire mer- 
chandise seeking wide awake eastern 
representation. He hinted big things in 
the near future for his company, so let's 
keep our eyes on this rapidly growing 
concern. 

Talking about advertising possibilities 
via the screen for local neighborhood 
merchants. Just take a slant at those 
Rothacker Film Mfg. Company offer- 
ings. We have seen film features that 
would have to go some to even keep up 
with them. Looks like Watty has an- 
other gold mine under cover. 

Those Vod-A-Vil Movies of H. A. 
Spanuth's seem to have caught on, if 
that newly acquired Chalmers talks any. 
H. A. says nothing, but smiles a whole 
lot. 

Yes sir, the State-Lake Theatre opened 
March 17 with the film production of 
Exhibitors-Mutual "What Every Woman 
Wants." 

Society note: Willie "Shakespeare" 
Hirschberger warbled "Where the River 
Shannon Flows" before one of the local 
Clan N'Gaels gatherings on Paddy's Day 
Watch your step, Bill. 

W. Van Gelder, Pathe salesman for 
the past six years, and W. S. Altand, for- 
merly with Doll Van, have been added to 
the staff of salesmen working under F. J. 
Flaherty at the Film Clearing House. 

William E. Parr has taken over the old 
Harmony Theatre, 43rd street and Vin- 
cennes avenue, and renamed it the 
"Parr." He is installing a new ventila- 
tion system and making other exten- 
sive repairs and will open up about 
April 10. 



Burton Holmes to Film 

Europe During Summer 

Burton Holmes, traveler and lecturer 
and creator of the Paramount-Holmes 
travelogues, who has been delivering a 
series of lectures on "The Yanks" at 
Orchestra Hall, will go to Europe dur- 
ing the coming summer to obtain mate- 
rial for a sequel to his current series. 

His next season's series will show Eu- 
rope in the remaking, the pictures and 
lectures dealing with liberated Belgium 
and Flanders, the occupied Rhineland, 
"Italia Redenta" and vanished Russia. 



Exhibitor in Record 

Thomas C. McGlaskey, proprietor of 
the Liberty Theatre, Bloomfield Ky., a 
town of 400 inhabitants, took in $500 in 
one day with the Hearts of the World. 
His house seats 230. He charged $1 for 
matinee and evening and 75 cents for a 
morning performance He advertised 
the picture with the aid of a sixteen- 
page publicity bulletin written by H. G. 
Dollman, vice-president of Doll-Van. 

52 



Lubliner and Trinz to 

Play "The Carter Case" 

Harry Grossman, of Oliver Films, 
Inc., announces that Celebrated Players 
Film Corporation of Chicago have 
booked "The Carter Case" for the en- 
tire circuit of theatres controlled by 
Lubliner & Trinz. Mr. Grossman states 
that this booking followed immediately 
behind the initial showing of several 
episodes by the Celebrated Players Film 
Corporation in Chicago. 

Bookings for "The Carter Case" are 
now being made at a rapid rate through- 
out the country; enthusiastic reports 
from the various exchanges are being 
received daily at fhe offices of Oliver 
Films, Inc. 



Congratulates Rothacker 

George Fischer, manager of Saxe's 
Alhambra Theatre at Milwaukee, has 
written the following letter to the Roth- 
acker Film Manufacturing Company: 
"After screening 'A Midnight Romance' 
we have concluded that First National 
has again secured another winner, Anita 
Stewart as well as Louis B. Mayer are 
again to be congratulated on producing 
another assured success. In my long 
experience as a theatre manager I have 
seen many costly productions ruined by 
poor developing or laboratory work. 
You are certainly also to be congratu- 
lated on the high standard you have set, 
especially in printing, toning and clear- 
cut, all around work that you have done 
on 'A Midnight Romance.' " 



Names Theatre "Select" 

G. K. Hanks, owner of the Princess 
Theatre at Andrews, S. C, who has met 
with a series of successes with Select 
pictures, has decided to rename his play- 
house "Select." 



While in Kansas City Make Your 
Home at the 

Westgate Hotel 

200 Rooms 200 Baths 
Rates $1.50 and Up— "Mostly $1.50" 



Circu- 
lating 
Ice 
Water 
In Every 
Room 

Every 
Room 

Has 
Private 

Bath 



Popular 
Priced 
Restau- 
rant 




Absolutely Fireproof 

Westgate Hotel 

At the Junction 
On Main and Delaware at Ninth 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



ENDAR-0FPROGRAMPUBLICATIG 



AMERICAN FILM COMPANY 

(Available at Pathe Exchanges.) 

"Eves of Julia Deep," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Money Isn't Everything," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Hobbs in a Hurry," five reels, with William Russell. 
"Mantle of Charity," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Rosemary Climbs the Heights," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"All the World to Nothing," five reels, with William Russell. 
"Wives and Other Wives," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Fair Enough," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"When a Man Rides Alone," five reels, with William Russell. 
"The Amazing Imposter," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Molly of the Follies," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Where the West Begins," five reels, with William Russell. 

EXHIBITORS' MUTUAL DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

Nov. 17 — "The Daredevil," five reels, with Gail Kane. 

Dec. — Martin Johnson's "Cannibals of the South Seas," five reels. 

Dec. — Affiliated, "The Girl of My Dreams," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 

Dec. —"And a Still Small Voice," five reels, with Henry B. Walthall. 

Tan. — "All of a Sudden Norma, five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 

Jan. — "Life's a Funny Proposition," five reels, with Wm. Desmond. 

Jan. — "Bonds of Honor," five reels, with Sessue Hayakawa. 

Jan. — "Hoop-La," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 

Jan. — "The Eleventh Commandment," five reels, with Lucille Lee Stewart. 

Feb. — "Trick of Fate/' five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 

Feb. — "Long Lane's Turning," five reels, with Henry B. Walthall. 

Feb. — "The Prodigal Liar," five reels, with William Desmond. 

Feb. — "What Every Woman Wants," five reels, with All Star Cast. 

Feb. — Martin Johnson's "Cannibals of South Seas," final installment, five 
reels. 

Mar. — "A Heart in Pawn," five reels, with Sessue Hayakawa. 

Mar. — "The Lamb and the Lion," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
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Oct. 
Nov. 

Dec. 
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an. 

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Oct. 
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STRAND COMEDIES 

'Keep Smiling," one reel. 
The Girl in the Box," one reel. 
The Tale of a Hat," one reel. 
'Are Brunettes False"? one reel. 
'Just Home Made," one reel. 
"Dan Cupid, M. D.," one reel 



17—' 
84— 
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'Beans for Two," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
They Did and They Didn't, two reels, with Elinor Field. 
"Accidental Heroes," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
'Some Mother," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
"Easy Payments," one reel. 

'How to Be Happy Though Married," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
'Merely Marrying Mary," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
'Almost a Hero," one reel, with Elinor Feild. 
'Their Baby," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
"The Wigwam System," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
'The Door Between," one reel. 
'His Wife's Birthday," one reel. 
'The Way of a Maid," one reel. 

OUT-DOOR SUBJECTS 

'A Tropic Melting Pot," one reel. 
'Black Feet and Flat Heads," one reel. 
'Bad Men and Good Scenery," one reel. 
"Peaks, Parks and Pines," one reel. 
"A Maori Romance," one reel. 
'Vacation Land," one reel. 
"High and Hungry," one reel. 
Teetotalers, Tea and Totum Poles," one reel. 
"Geesers and Geysers," one reel. 
"Bulls and Bears." 
"Western Stuff." 
'Doing the Dells." 
'A Bit of God's Country." 
'Out Wyoming Way." 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

ARTCRAFT PICTURES 

'The Border Wireless," five reels, with Wm. S. Hart. 
'My Cousin," five reels, with Enrico Caruso. 
"Under the Greenwood Tree," five reels with Elsie Ferguson. 
"Arizona," five reels, with Douglas Fairbanks. 
"Greatest Thing in Life," Griffith Special. 
"Squaw Man," six reels, all star cast. 
"Branding Broadway," five reels, with William S. Hart 
'Out of the Shadow," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 
'Under the Top," five reels, with Fred Stone. 
"His Parisian Wife," five reels, with Elsie Ferguson. 
'Here Comes the Bride," five reels, with John Barrymore. 
The Romance of Happy Valley," Griffith Special. 
"Don't Change Your Husband, DeMille. 
"Breed of Men," five reels, with William S. Hart. 
'Alias Mike Moran," five reels, with Wallace Reid. 
'Johnny Get Your Gun," five reels, with Fred Stone. 
'The Marriage Price," five reels, with Elsie Ferguson. 
'The Poppy Girl's Husband," five reels, with W. S. Hart. 
'The Girl Who Stayed at Home," five reels. (D. W. Griflith.) 

PARAMOUNT 

"The Man from Funeral Range," five reels, with Wallace Reid. 
"Such a Little Pirate," five reels, with Lila Lee. 
"When Do We Eat?" five reels, with Enid Bennett. 
'The Gypsy Trail," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 
The Make-Brli eve Wife," five reels, with Billie Burke. 
"Woman's Weapons," five reels, with Ethel Dayton. 
"A Daughter of Old South," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 
"Mirandy Smiles," five reels, with Vivian Martin. 
"Fuss and Feathers," five reels, with Enid Bennett 



Dec. 8 — 'Too Many Millions," five reels, with Wallace Reid. 

Dec 15 — "Good-Bye, Bill," five reels, with Shirley Mason. 

Dec 22 — "String Beans," five reels, with Charles Ray. 

Dec 22 — 'The Mystery Girl," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 

Dec 22 — "Quicksand, five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 

Dec. 29 — "Little Miss Hoover." five reels, with Marguerite Clark. 

Dec 29 — 'The Hope Chest," five reels, with Dorothy Giah. 

Dec. 29 — "The Way of a Man with a Maid," five reels, with Bryant Waak- 
burn. 

Jan. 6— "Out of the Shadow," five reels, with Pauline Frdeerick. 

Jan. 6— "Jane Goes a-Wooing." five reels, with Vivian Martin. 

Jan. 12 — "The Secret Garden, five reels, with Lila Lee. 

Jan. 19 — 'The Du»>." five reels, with Wallace Reid. 

Jan. 26 — "Venus in the East," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 

Feb. 2 — "Hard Boiled," five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 

Feb. 2 — "Happy Though Married," five reels, with Enid Bennett 

Feb. 9 — "Mrs. Wiggs of Cabbage Patch," five reels, with Margaret Clark. 

Feb. 9 — "Two Brides," five reels, with Lina Cavalieri. 

Feb. 9 — "The Girl Dodger," five reels, with Charles Ray. 

Feb. 16 — "Boots," five reels, with Dorothy Gish. 

Feb. 16 — "You Never Saw Such a Girl," five reels, with Vivian Martin. 

Feb. 23 — "Maggie Pepper," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 

Feb. 23 — "Paid in Full," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 

Feb. 23 — "The Winning Girl," five reels, with Shirley Mason. 

Mar. 2 — "Good Gracious, Annabelle," five reels, with Billie Burke. 

Mar. 2 — "Puppy Love," five reels, with Lila Lee. 

Mar. 9 — "The Poor Boob," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 

Mar. 16 — "Three Men and a Girl," five reels with Marguerite Clark. 

Mar. 16 — "Extravagance," five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 

Mar. 23 — "Partners Three," five reels, with Enid Bennett. 

Mar. 23 — "The Sheriff's Son," five reels, with Charles Ray. 

Mar. 30 — "The Malefactor," five reels, with John Barrymore. 

Mar. 30 — "Little Comrade," five reels, with Vivian Martin. 

Mar. 30 — "Peppy Polly," five reels, with Dorothy Gish. 

PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT SPECIALS 
Dec. 1 — "Sporting Life," seven reels. 

Jan. 5 — "Little Women," seven reels. > 

Feb. 16 — "False Faces," five reels. 

TWO-REEL COMEDIES 

Dec 28 — Flagg, "Perfectly Fiendish Flannagan." / J 

Jan. 12— Sennett. "Never Too Old." / , . „ 

Jan. 19 — Flagg, Impropaganda." / s 

Jan. 26 — Sennett, "Cupid's Day Out." 

Feb. 2 — Stagg, "One Every Minute." 

Feb. 2 — Drews, "Romance and Rings." / 

Feb. 16 — Arbuckle, "Pullman Porter." 

Feb. 9 — Sennett, "Rip & Stitch, Tailors." 

Feb. 23 — Sennett, "East Lynn with Variations." 

Mar. 2 — Arbuckle, "Love." 

Mar. 9 — Sennett, "The Village Smithy." 

Mar. 16 — Drew, "Once a Mason." 

Mar. 23— Sennett, "Reilly's Wash Day." 

Mar. 30 — Flagg, "Beresford of Barboons." 

FOX FILM CORPORATION ] 

BIG, TIMELY PICTURES 

"The Prussian Cur." All star cast, eight parts. 
"The Land of the Free." All star cast, seven parts. 
"Queen of the Sea." Five parts, with Annette Kellerman. 
"Why I Should Not Marry." All star cast, five parts. 

PRODUCTIONS EXTRAORDINARY 

"Cleopatra." Eight parts, with Theda Bara. 
"Les Miserables." Eight parts, with William Farnum. 
"Salome." Eight parts, with Theda Bara. 

STANDARD PICTURES 

Dec. 1 — "The She-Devil," five reels, with Theda Bara. 

Dec. 16 — "I Want to Forget," five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 

Dec. 29 — "For Freedom," five reels, with William Farnum. 

Jan. 12 — "The Light," five reels, with Theda Bara. 

Jan. 26 — "Woman! Woman I" five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit 

Feb. 9 — "Every Mother's Son," five reels, All Star Cast 

Feb. 23 — "The Man Hunter," five reels, with William Farnum. 

Mar. 9 — "When Men Desire," five reels, with Theda Bara. 

Mar. 23 — "Thou Shalt Not," five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 

Apr. 20 — "Wolves of the Night," five reels, with William Farnum. 

May 4 — "The Siren's Song," five reels, with Theda Bara. 

VICTORY PICTURES 

Dec 8 — "The Strange Woman," five reels, with Gladys BroekweD. 

Dec. 22— "I'll Say So." five reels, with George Walsh. 

Jan. 5 — "Treat 'Em Rough," five reels, with Tom Mix. 

Jan. 19 — "The Call of the Soul," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 

Feb. 2 — "Luck and Pluck," five reels, with George Walsh. 

Feb. 18 — "Hell Roarin* Reform," five reels, with Tom Mix. 

Mar. 2 — "The Forbidden Room," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 

Mar. 16 — "Never Say Quit," five reels, with George Walsh. 

Mar. 30 — "Fighting for Gold," five reels, with Tom Mix. 

Apr. 13 — "Pitfalls of New York," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 

Apr. 27 — "Help! Help! Police! five reels, with George Walsh. 

EXCEL I'M Tl It ES 

Dec. 1 — "Buchanan's Wife," five reels, with Virginia Pearson. 

Dec. 16— "Caught in the Act," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 

Dec. 29 — "The Danger Zone," five reels, with Madlaine Traverse. 

Jan. 26 — "The Girl with No Regrets," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 
Feb. 9 — "The Love Auction," five reels, with Virginia Pearson. 

Feb. 23 — "Smiles," five reels, with Jane and Katherine Lee. 
Mar. 9 — "Gambling in Souls," five reels, with Madlaine Traverse. 

Mar. 23 — "The Rebellious Bride," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 
Apr. 6 — "Married in Haste," five reels, with Albert Ray. 



53 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



FOX EXTRAVAGANZAS 

Nor. 17— "Fan Fan." 

Nov. 26 — "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieve*." 

THE GREAT NINE SERIES 

Dee. 29 — William Farnum in "Fighting Blood." 
Jan. 6— Theda Bara in "The Serpent." 

Jan. 12 — "Regeneration." 

Jan. 19 — William Farnum in "The Broken Law." 

Jan. 26 — Theda Bara in "Under Two Flags." 

Feb. 2 — "Infidelity" (Dr. Rameau). 

Feb. 9 — Valeska Suratt in "The Soul of Broadway." 

Feb. 16 — Theda Bara in "The Darling of Paris." 

Feb. 23 — William Farnum in "Hoodman Blind." 

WILLIAM FOX SUNSHINE AND TOM MIX COMEDIES 

Dec. 15— "The Fatal Marriage." 

Dec. 29— "The Son of a Hun." 

Jan. 12 — Tom Mix in "Hearts and Saddles." 

Jan. 26— "Oh, What a Knight." 

Feb. 9 — Tom Mix in "A Roman Cowboy." 

Feb. 23— "A Lady Bellhop's Secret." 

Mar. 23 — "Money Talks." 

Feb. 23 — "His Musical Sneeze," two reels. 

Mar. 9 — "Six-Cylinder Love," two reels, with Tom Mix. 

Apr. 6 — "Tom and Jerry," two reels, with Tom Mix. 

Apr. 20 — "The House of Terrible Scandal," two reels. 

May 4 — "A Lady Bell-Hop's Secret," two reels. 

MUTT AND JEFF ANIMATED CARTOONS 

Dec. 22— "The Draft Board." 

Dec. 29— "Throwing the Bull." 
an. 6 — "The Lion Tamer." 

an. 12 — "Here and There." 

Jan. 19 — "The Hula Cabaret." 

Jan. 26 — "Doggone Tough Luck." 
Feb. 2 — "Landing an Heiress." 
Feb. 9. — "The Bearded Lady." 

Feb. 16— "5.000 Miles on a Gallon of Gas." 

Feb. 23— "The Pousse Cafe." 
Mar. 2 — "Fireman, Save My Child." 
Mar. 9 — "Wild Waves and Angry Women." 

Mar. 16 — "William Hohenzollern, Sausage-Maker." 

Mar. 23 — "Out and In Again," half reel. 

Mar. 30 — -"A Cow's Husband," half reel. 
Apr. 6 — "Mutt, the Mutt Trainer," half reel. 



GENERAL FILM COMPANY, INC. 

BROADWAY STAR FEATURE 

"Tobin's Palm," two reels. 

"The Rose of Wolfville," two reels 

"A Ramble in Aphasia," two reels. 

BLUE RIDGE DRAMAS — Ned Finley 

"The Raiders of Sunset Gap," two reels. 
"O'Garry Rides Alone," two reels. 
"The Man from Nowhere," two reels. 

ESS AN AY-CHAPLIN COMEDIES 

"A Night in the Show," two reels. 
"Shanghaied," two reels. 
"The Bank." two reels. 
"Police," two reels. 

CRYSTAL FILM COMEDY 

'The Lady Detective and His Wedding Day," split reel. 
"Troubled Waters,' one reel. 

"Her Necklace and His Hoodoo Day," split reel. 

CLOVER COMEDIES 

"From Caterpillar to Butterfly," one reel. 
"A Widow's Camouflage," one reel. 
"Love's Lucky Day," one reel. 
"Oh I the Women," one reel. 

DUPLEX FILMS, INC. 

"Shame," seven reels. 

EBONY COMEDIES 

"When You Hit, Hit Hard," one reel. 
"A Black and Tan Mix-Up," one reel. 

ESSANAY COMEDIES 

"Snakeville's New Sheriff," one reel. 
"Sophie's Birthday Party," one reel. 

EXPORT AND IMPORT FILM CORP. 
• Why — the Bolsheviki," five reels. 

HANOVER FILM COMPANY' 

"Camille," six reels. 

"The Marvelous Maeiste," six reels. 

"Monster of Fate.'" 

HIGHGRADE FILM ENTERPRISES, Inc. 

"Billie in Society," two reels. 
"Bunco Billy," two reels." 
"Billy in Harness," two reels 
"Bombs and Bull," two reels. 

COSMOFOTOFILM 

"Hypocrites," six reels. 
"I Believe," six reels. 

AUTHOR'S PHOTOPLAYS, INC. 
"Her Moment," seven reels, drama. 



INTERSTATE FILM COMPANY 
•The Last Raid of Zeppelin L-81." 

FORT PITT THEATRE 
The Italian Battlefront," eight reels. 

OAKDALE PRODUCTIONS 

"No Children Wanted," five reels. 
"Miss Mischief Maker," five reels. 
"Little Miss Grown-Up," five reels. 
"The Midnight Burglar," five reels. 
"Wanted, a Brother," five reels 
'The Locked Heart," five reels. 

OFFICIAL WAR PICTURES 
Committee Public Information 
"Our Bridge of Ships," two reels. 

Committee Public Information 
**♦">»» a Fox Farm," one reel. 

RANCHO SERIES 
(All Two-Reel Dramas.) 

'Jn the shadow of the Rockies." 
"Where the Sun Sets Red." 

AMERICAN RED CROSS 

"Rebuilding Broken Lives," one reel. 
"Victorious Serbia," one reel. 
"First Aid on the Piave," one reel. 
'The Helping Hand of Sicily," one reel. 

RAINBOW COMEDIES 

"How She Hated Men," one reel. 
"The Camouflage Baby, one reel. 
"The Pipe of Peace," one reel. 
'"Hooverizing," one reel. 

SCRANTONIA PHOTOPLAY CORPORATION 

'Parson Pepp," one reel. 

'Fang's Fate and Fortune," one reel. 

AMERICAN FEATURE FILM CORPORATION 
"Hearts of Love " six reels, with Edna Mayo. 

MAXWELL PRODUCTIONS 
"The Married Virgin," seven reels. 



GOLDWYN PICTURES CORPORATION 

GOLDWYN STAR PRODUCTIONS 

Sept. 2 — "The Turn of a Wheel," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Sept. 9 — "Peck's Bad Girl," five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Sept. 16 — "X ust for Tonight," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Sept. 23 — "The Kingdom of Youth," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Sept. 80 — "Laughing Bill Hyde," with Will Rogers. 

Oct. 7 — "Hidden Fires," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Nov. 17— "Thirty a Week," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Nov. 24 — "A Perfect 86,". five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Dec. 1 — 'The Hell Cat," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Dec. 8 — "A Perfect Lady," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Dec. 15 — 'Too Fat to Fight ; " six reels, with Frank Mclntrye. 

Dec. 22 — "The Racing Strain," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Dec. 29 — "Go West, Young Man," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Jan. 12 — "Day Dreams." five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Jan. 26 — "Shadows," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Feb. 2 — "The Bondage of Barbara," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Feb. 16 — "Sis Hopkins," five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Feb. 23 — "The Woman on the Index," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 

Mar. 9 — "The Brand." seven reels (Rex Beach SoeciaH 

Mar. 16 — "A Man and His Money," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Mar. 30 — "Daughter of Mine," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Apr. 6 — "Spotlight Sadie," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Apr. 13 — "One Week of Life," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 

GOLDWYN SPECIALS 

"For the Freedom of the World," seven reels. 
"The Manx-Man," seven reels. 

"Heart of the Sunset," seven reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson 
"Blue Blood " six reels. 

"Honor's Cross," six reels, with Howard Heckman. 
"Social Ambition," seven reels. 

"For the Freedom of the East" (Betzwood), six reels. 
"The Border Legion," six reels. 

FORD EDUCATIONAL WEEKLY 

an. 18— "What Uncle Sam Will Do for Two Cents." 
an. 20— "The Truth About the Liberty Motor." 
an. 27— "Hang It All!" 
Feb. 8 — "Carrying Old Glory to the Seven Seas." 
Feb. 10 — "Canada's Mountain of Tears." 
Feb. 17— "Where 'The Spirit That Won' Was Born." 
Feb. 24— "Rough Stuff." 

CAPITOL COMEDIES 

Nov. 17 — "A Pair of Pink Pajamas," two reels. 

Dec. 1 — "Proposing Bill," two reels. 

Dec. 15 — 'The Jelly Fish," two reels. 

Dec. 29 — "Poor Innocent," two reels. 

Jan. 12 — "You Know What I Mean," two reels. 

Jan. 26 — "The Big Idea." 

Feb. 7 — "Have Another." 

Feb. 23 — "A Master of Music." 

Mar. 9 — "The New Breakfast Food." 

Mar. 23 — "The Potum of Swat." 

Apr. 6 — "The Midnight Alarm." 

54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



BENNISON STAR SERIES 

"Oh, Johnny," five reels, with Louis Benhison. 

"Sandy Burke of the U-Bar U," five reels, with Louis Bennison. 
"Speedy Meade," five reels, with Louis Bennison. 
"High Pockets, five reels, with Louis Bennison. 

W. W. HODKINSON CORPORATION 

(Available Through Pathe Exchanges.) 



Dec 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Tan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Apr. 

Apr. 



30 — "The Challenge Accepted," 
6 — "The Drifters," five reels, 
20 — "The Law That Divides," 
27 — "Fighting Through," six r 
10 — "Come Again Smith," five 
16 — "Made in America, first 
23 — "The Love Hunger," five 
9 — "The Forfeit," five reels, 
23— "The End of the Game,' 



five reels, with Zena Keefe. 
with J. Warren Kerrigan, 
five reels, with Kathleen Clifford, 
eels, with E. K. Lincoln, 
reels, with J_. Warren Kerrigan, 
episode of eight one-reel series, 
reels, with Lillian Walker, 
with House Peters and Jane Miller. 
' five reels, with J. Warren Kerrigan. 



METRO PICTURE CORPORATION 

2 — "The Testing of Mildren Vane," fiv ereels, with May Allison. 
9 — "Hitting the High Spots," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

18 — "Sylvia on a Spree, five reels, with Emmy Wehlan. 

28 — "The Poor Rich Man," five reels, with Francis X. Bushman. 

30 — "Her Inspiration," five reels, with May Allison. 

6 — "The Gold Cure," five reels, with Viola Dana. 

13 — "The Spender," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

20 — "The Divorcee," five reels, with Ethel Barrymore. 
27 — "In for Thirty Days," five reels, with May Allison. 

3 — "Faith," five reels, with Bert Lytell. , 

10 — "As the Sun Went Down," five reels, with Edith Storey. 
17 — "Johnny on the Spot," five reels, with Hale Hamilton. 
24 — "Peggy Does Her Darndest," five reels, with May Allison. 

3 — "Satan Junior," five reels, with Viola Dana. 
10 — "Blind Man's Eyes," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 
17 — "The Way of the Strong," five reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson. 
24 — "That's Good," five reels, with Hale Hamilton. 

31 — "Jeanne of the Gutter." five reels, with Viola Dana. 

7 — "The Island of Intrigue," five reels, with Mary Allison. 

14 — "Out of the Depths, ' five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

SCREEN CLASSICS, INC., SPECIALS 



"Draft 268," seven reels, with Mabel Taliaferro. 

"Blue Jeans," seven reels, with Viola Dana. 

"Lest We Forget," eight reels, with Rita Jolivet. 

"The Legion of Death," seven reels, with Edith Storey. 

"My Own United States," eight reels, with Arnold Daly. 

"The Million Dollar Dollies," five reels, with the Dolly Sisters. 

"To Hell With the Kaiser." seven reels. 

"Pals First," six reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

"The Great Victory, Wilson or the Kaiser, the Fall of the Hohenzollerns,' 
seven reels. 

"Why Germany Must Pay," six reels, All Star Cast. 
"The Great Romance," six reels, with Harold Lockwood. 
"Shadows of Suspicion," five reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

NAZIMOVA PRODUCTIONS 

"Revelation," seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Toys of Fate," seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Eye for Eye" seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Out of the rog," seven reels, with Nazimova. 



Sept. 8- 
Dec. 1- 
Mar. 2- 
Apr. 27— 



Sept. 22- 



No 
Dec. 



17- 
15- 



Jan. 12 — 
Feb. 9— 
Mar. 9— 

Apr. 6 — ' 



PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

PATHE SPECIAL FEATURES 

-"Her Man," six reels, with Elaine Hammerstein. 
-"Infatuation," six reels, with Gaby Deslys. 
-"Common Clay," seven reels, with Fannie Ward. 
"The TJnknown Love," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli and E. K. 
Lincoln. 

EXTRA SELECTED STAR PHOTOPLAYS 

-"A Japanese Nightingale," five reels, with Fannie Ward. 
-"The Bells," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
-"The Narrow Path," five reels, with Fannie Ward. 
'The Midnight Stage," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
'Todd of the Times," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
-"Carolyn of the Corners," five reels, with Bessie Love. 
"The Silver Girl," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 

PATHE PROGRAM FEATURES 

-"The Border Raiders," five reels, with Betty Compson and George 
Larkin. 

-"Milady o' the Beanstalk," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne. 
-"Dolly's Vacation," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne. 
-"A Vagabond of France," four reels, with Henri Krauss. 
-"The Old Maid's Baby," five reels, with Marie Osborne. 
-"Go Get 'Em Garringer," five reels, with Helene Chadwick. 

PERFECTION PICTURES 
Jan. 7 — Kleine, "Quo Vadis," eight reels. 

Jan. 10 — Selig, "Brown of Harvard," six reels, with Tom Moore and Haze) 
Daly. 

Feh. 1 — Essanay, "Men Who Have Made Love to Me," six reels, with Mary 
MacLane. 

Essanay, "Ruggles of Red Gap," six reels, with Taylor HcJines. 

Jan. 21 — Edison, "The Unbeliever," seven reels, with Raymond McKee. 

Essanay, "A Pair of Sixes," six reels, with Taylor Holmes. 

Essanay, "The Curse of Iku," seven reels, with Frank Borzage. 

Edison, "The Wall Invisible." six reels, with Shirley Mason. 



SELECT PICTURES CORPORATION 

— "Her Great Chance," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

— "Road Through the Dark," five reels, with Clara Kimball Young. 

— "The Heart of Wetona,' five reels, with Norma Talmadge. 

— "In the Hollow of Her Hand," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

— "A Lady's Name," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

— "Code of the Yukon," five reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 



Oct. 5- 

Dec. 1- 

Dec. 29- 

Jan. 26- 

Feb. 23- 

Mar. 23 



lov. 
■Jov. 
>ec. 
)ec. 
3ec. 
5ec. 



Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 



"Who Cares," five reels, 
"Cheating Cheaters," five 
"The Indestructible Wife 
"Romance and Arabella," 
"The Belle of New York, 
"Children of Banishment, 
"The World to Live In,' 
"The Probation Wife," si 
"Experimental Marriage,' 
"Marie. Ltd.," five reels, 



with Constance Talmadge. 
reels, with Clara Kimball Young. 
" five reels, with Alice Brady, 
five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 
' five reels, with Marion Davies. 
' five reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 
' five reels, with Alice Brady, 
x reels, with Norma Talmadge. 
' five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 
with Alice Brady. 



SPECIALS 



"The One Woman," with All-star cast. 

"The Cavell Case," with Julia Arthur. 

"The Midnight Patrol," an Ince Production. 

"Ruling Passions," with Julia Dean and Edwin Arden. 

"The Hidden Truth," six reels, with Anna Case. 

"Over There," six reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson and Charles Richman. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec 
Dec 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



18—' 

17— ' 

1 — ' 
24 — ' 

8— ' 

15— ' 

22— ' 

29— ' 
26— 

2— ' 

9— ' 

18— ' 

23— ' 
2—' 
9—' 

16— ' 
23—' 

30— ' 



7 — 
14— 

18—' 

26 — ' 
86—' 

9— 
16— 
28—' 
30—' 
80—' 

6— 
13— 
20 — 

27— ' 
3—' 

10—' 
17—' 
24—' 



TRIANGLE FILM CORPORATION 

'Tony America," five reels, with Francis McDonald. 
'The Pretender," five reels, with William Desmond. 
'Reckoning Day," five reels, with Belle Bennett. 
'Love's Pay Day," five reels, with Rosemary Theby. 
'Deuce Duncan," five reels, with William Desmond. 
'The Silent Rider," five reels, with Roy Stewart. 
'Irish Eyes, " five reels, with Pauline tSarke. 
'Crown Jewels," five reels, with Claire Anderson. 
'Wife or Country," five reels, with Gloria Swanson. 
"Unto the End," five reels, with Crane Wilbur. 
'Restless Souls," five reels, with Alma Rubens. 
'Secret Marriage," five reels, with Mary MacLaren. 
'Child of M'sieu," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne 
'Breezy Jim," five reels, with Crane Wilbur. 
'Wild Goose Chase," five reels, with Hazel Daly. 
'The Railroader," five reels, with George Fawcette. 
'It's a Bear" (specail), five reels, with Taylor Holmes. 
'The Little Rowdy," five reels, with Hazel Daly. 
'Toton" (special), five reels, with Olive Thomas. 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. COMPANY 

BLUEBIRD PHOTOPLAYS 

'The Lure of Luxury," five reels, with Ruth Clifford.' 
'Together," five reels, with Violet Mersereau. 
'Hugon, the Mighty," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 
'Dealing with Daphne," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 
'All Night." five reels, with Cartnel Myers. 
"Set Free,' five reels, with Edith Roberts. 
'The Cabaret Girl," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 
'The Light of Victory," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 
'The Sea Flower," five reels, with Juanita Hansen. 
'The Cabaret Girl," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 
"The Natures Girl," five reels, with Violet Mesereau. 
"The Craving," five reels, with Francis Ford. 
"The Game's Up," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 
'Who Will Marry Me?" five reels, with Carmel Meyers. 
"Sue of the South," five reels, with Edith Roberts. 
'Millionaire Pirate," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 
'Sealed Envelope," five reels, with Fritzi Brunette. 
'The Little White Savage," five reels, Carmel Meyers. 

BLUEBIRD SPECIALS 



"Eagle's Wings," five reels, war drama. 

"Even as You and I," five reels, with Lois Weber. 

"Come Through," seven reels, with Herbert Rawlinson. 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 



28—' 

5— 
12— 

18—' 
2 — ' 
16—' 
80— 

13—' 
27—' 
10—' 

24—' 
10— 
17— 
24— 
31 — 



UNIVERSAL FEATURES 

'Modern Love," five reels, with Mae Murray. 
The Talk of the Town." six reels, with Dorothy Phillips. 
"Fighting for Freedom. 

'Three Mounted Men," five reels, with Harry Carey. 
'Kiss or Kill," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 
'Vanity Pool," five reels, with Mary Maclaren. 
'Wild Cat of Paris," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 
"Danger, Go Slow, five reels, with Mae Murray. 
'After the War," five reels, with Grace Cunard. 
'Roped," five reels, with Harry Carey. 
Creaking Stairs," five reels, with Mary MacLaren. 
'The Wicked Darling," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 
'The Scarlet Shadow," six reels, with Mae Murray. 
'Light of Victory," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 
'A Fight for Love," six reels, Special, with Harry Carey. 
'A Silk Lined Burglar," six reels, with Priscilla Dean. 



VITAGRAPH 



"By the World Forgot," five reels, with Hedda Nova. 

"The Girl of Today," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

"A Diplomatic Mission," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

"The Mating," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

"The King of Diamonds," five reels, with Harry Morey. 

"Everybody's Girl," five reels, with Alice Joyce. 

"Miss Ambition," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

"The Dawn of Understanding," five reels, with Bessie Love. 

"The Man Who Wouldn't Tell," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

"The Beloved Imposter," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

"Hoarded Assets," five reels, with Harry Morey. 

"The Captain's Captain," five reels, with Alice Jovce. 

"The Adventure Shop," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

Jan. 27 — "The Enchanted Barn, five reels, with Bessie Love. 

Feb. 8 — "The Highest Trump," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

Feb. 10 — "Fortune's Child." five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

Feb. 17 — "Silent Strength," five reels, with Harry Morey. 

Feb. 24 — "The Lion and the Mouse" (special — Alice Joyce). 

Mar. 8 — "The Girl Problem," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

Mar. 10 — "The Wishing Ring Man." five reels, with Bessie Love 

Mar. 10 — "From Headquarters," Special, five reels, with Anita Stewart. 

Mar. 17 — "A Gentleman of Quality," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

Mar. 24 — "Miss Duloic from Dixie," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

Mar. 31 — "Fighting Destiny," five reels, with Harry T. Morey. 

Apr. 7 — "The Cambric Mask," five reels, with Alice Joyce. 

Apr. 14 — "The Unknown Quantity," five reels, with Corinne Gri. .th. 

Apr. 21 — "A Yankee Princess," five reels, with Bessie Love. 



55 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



WORLD FILM CORPORATION 

Oct. 7— "The Appearance of Evil," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

Oct. 14 — "The Road to France," five reels, with Carlyle Blackwelt 
Dec 2 — "Hitting the Trail," five reels, with Carlyle Blackwell. 
Dec. 9 — "The Man of Bronze," five reels, with Lewis S. Stone. 

Dec 16 — "The Zero Horn," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

Nov. 18 — "Just Sylvia," five reels, with Barbara Castleton. 

Nov. 26 — "The Grough." five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Dec 28— "The Love Net," five reels, with Madge Evans. 

Dec. SO — "The Sea Waif," five reels, with Louise Huff. 

an. 6 — "What Love Forgives," five reels, with Barbara Castleton. 

an. 6— "Under Four Flags," five reels. 

an. 18 — "Love in a Hurry," five reels, with Carlyle Blackwell. 

an. 20 — "The Bluffer," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

an. 87 — "Heart of Gold," five reels, with Louise Huff. 
Feb. 3 — "The Roughneck," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Feb. 10 — "Mandarin's Gold," five reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Feb. 17 — "Courage for Two." five reels, with Carlyle Blackwell. 

Feb. 24 — "The Moral Deadline," five reels, with Frank Mayo. 

Mar. 8 — "Crook of Dreams," five reels, with Louis Huff. 

Mar. 10 — "The Unveiling Hand," five reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Mar. 17 — "The Hand Invisible, five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Mar. 24 — "Hit or Miss," five reels, with Carlyle Blackwell. 

Mar. 31 — "Love Defender," five reels, with Madge Evans. 
Apr. 7 — "The Little Intruder," five reels, with Johnny Hines. 



Apr. 14 — "The Scar," five reels, with Irving Cummings. 

Apr. 21 — "The Quickening Flame," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

UNITED PICTDRB THEATRES 

Jan. 5 — "The Light of Western Stars," seven reels, with Dustin Faraom. 

Jan. 26 — "Adele," six reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Feb. 23 — "A Man in the Open," five reels, with Dustin Farnum. 
— "Her Code of Honor," five reels, with Florence Reed. 

SERIALS 

Wharton, "The Eagle's Eye" 

Pathe, "The House of Hate." 

Vitagraph, "The Woman in the Web." 

Universal, "The Lion's Claws." 

Vitagraph, "A Fight for Millions." 

Universal, "The Brass Bullet." 

Gaumont, "The Hand of Vengeance" 

Pathe, "Hands Up." 

Pathe, "Wolves of Kulture." 

Universal, "The Lure of the Circus." 

Francis Ford. "The Silent Mystery." 

Vitagraph, "The Man of Might," William Duncan. 

Pathe, ''The Lightning Raider," Pearl White. 

Universal, "The Red Glove," Marie Walcamp. 

Pathe, "Terror of the Range," with George Larkin. 

Oliver, "The Carter Case," with Herbert Rawlinson. 




THE OPEN MARKET 



STATE RIGHTS ISSUES 



SPECIAL, PRODUCTIONS 




ARROW FILM CORPORATION 

"The Deemster," nine reels, with Derwent Hall Caine. 

"Too Accidental Honeymoon," sue reels, with Robert Warwick. 

"The Million-Dollar Mystery," six reels. 

"My Husband's Friend," five reels. 

"Perfect Model," re-issue of "Inspiration," five reels. 

"Finger of Justice," six reels. 

"Sunset Princess." 

ATLANTA DISTRIBUTING CO. 

"Nine-Tenths of the Law." six reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 
"The Devil's Playground, seven reels. 

REX REACH PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Barrier," ten reels. 

REAR STATE FILM COMPANY 
"The Vigilantes," seven reels. 

DAVID BERNSTEIN 

"Redemption," with Evelyn Nesblt Thaw. 



"The Pale Pack Train," one reel. 
"Nature — Hot and Cold," one reel. 
"Men Met in the Mountains," one reel. 
"Before Breakfast," one reel. 



Jan. 31 — "Bringing the Boys Back Home," one reel. 

Feb. 1 — "Photoplay Magazine Screen Supplement," one reel. 

Feb. 3 — "Indian Life," one reel. 

Feb. 10 — "An Indian Love Story," one reel. 

Feb. 17 — "A Day With Caranza," one reel. 

Feb. 24 — "What Is a Mexican," one reel. 

Mar. 3 — "The Washington Air Patrol," one reel. 

EFFANGB FILM COMPANY 
"The Marriage Bond," five reels, with Nat Goodwin. 

EMERALD MOTION PICTURE CORPORATION 
"A Slacker's Heart," five reels. 

ENLIGHTENMENT PHOTOPLAY CORPORATION 

"Enlighten Thy Daughter," seven reels. 



CARDINAL FILM CORPORATION 
"Joan the Woman," eleven reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 



ESSAY HARRIS FEATURE FILM COMPANY 

'Alice in Wonderland," six reels. 



CHRISTIE FILM COMPANY 



EUGENIC FILM COMPANY 



Jan. 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



-"Five Hundred or Bust." 
Tan. 16— "Oh, Baby." 
Jan. 23- — "Good Gracious, Bobby." 
Jan. 30— "You Couldn't Blame Her." 
Feb. 6 — "For Love or Money." 
13 — "Salvation Sue." 
20 — "Four of a Kind." 
27 — "Welcome Home." 
Bobby Comes Marching Home." 
"BTides for Two." 
"Oh, What a Night." 
"Hard Luck." 
"Marrying Molly." 

CLUNE PRODUCTIONS 

"Ramona," eight reels. 

"The Eyes of the World," seven reels. 

COMMONWEALTH PICTURES CORPORATION 

"The Frozen Warning," five reels, with Charlotte 
"Spanuth's Original Vod-A-Vil Movies." 



"Birth," six reels. 



"The Curse of Eve,' 



CORONA CINEMA COMPANY 
seven reels, with Enid Markey. 



CREATIVE FILM CORPORATION 
"The Girl Who ©idn't Think," six reels. 

CREST PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Chosen Prince," eight reels. 
"The Grain of Dust," six reels, with Lillian Walker. 
"A Romance of the Air," five reels, with Lieut. Bert Hall. 

EDUCATIONAL FILMS CORPORATION 
(Robert C. Bruce Scenics) 
"The Wolf of the Tetons," one reel. 
"Nature — Rest and Motion," one reel. 
"Horizon Hunters," one reel. 
"The High Horse," one reel. 



EXPORT ft IMPORT FILM COMPANY 

"Humility." 

"Ivan the Terrible," six reels. 
"Loyal tjr." 

"Robespierre," seven reels. 
"Tyranny of the Romanoffs." 

FELIX F. FEIST 

"Stolen Orders," eight reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS' CIRCUIT, INC. 

"Tarzan of the Apes," six reels, with Elmo Lincoln. 
"Fall of the Romanoffs," eight reels, with Nance O'Neill. 
"Empty Pockets." seven reels. 
"The Passing of the Third Floor Back," with Sir Johnston Forbes-Roberta** 
"A Dog's Life," two reels, with Charlie Chaplin. 
Ambassador Gerard's "My Four Years in Germany." 
"The Life Mask," five reels, with Mmc Petrova. 
"The Light Within," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 
"Daughter of Destiny," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 
"Tempered Steel," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 
"Italy's Flaming Front." Italian official war film. 
"Pershing's Crusaders. 

"Romance of Tarzan," six reels, with Elmo Lincoln. 
"Shoulder Arms," three reels, with Charles Chaplin. 
"The Panther Woman," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 
"Virtuous Wives," six reels, with Anita Stewart. 
"Our Teddy," seven reels. 
"Sunnyside," two reels, with Charles Chaplin. 

FOUR SQUARE PICTURES 

"Madame Sherry/' five reels, with Gertrude McCoy. 
"The Submarine Eye," seven reels. 
"Should She Obey," seven reels, with Alice Wilson. 
"The Great White Trail," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 
"One Hour," six reels, with Zena Keefe. 
"The Cast-Off," five reels, with Bessie. Barriscale. 
"Men." 

"A Woman's Experience," seven reels, with Mary Boland. 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



FRATERNITY FILMS, INC. 

"The Devil's Playground," with Vera Michelena. 
"The Witching Hour," six reels, with Jack Sherrill. 
"Conquest of Canaan," five reels. 

FRIEDMAN ENTERPRISES. INC. 
"A Mormon Maid," six reels, with Mae Murray. 

FROHMAN AMUSEMENT CORPORATION 

"God's Man," nine reels, with H. B. Warner. 
"My Own United States," with Arnold Daly. 
"Once to Every Man," six reels, with Jack Sherrill. 

HARRY G ARSON 
"The Hushed Hour," five reels, with Blanche Sweet. 
"The Unpardonable Sin," eight reels, with Blanche Sweet. 

GENERAL ENTERPRISES 

"The Liar," six reels, with Jane Gail. 

"Mother," six reels, with Elizabeth Risdon. 

"The Warrior," seven reels, with Maciste. 

"Crucible of Life," seven reels, with Grace Darmond. 

GRAPHIC FILM COMPANY 

"The Woman and the Beast," five reels. 
"Moral Suicide," seven reels, with Leah Baird. 
"When Men Betray," six reels, with Gail Kane. 

D. W. GRIFFITH 

"The Birth of a Nation," nine reels, with H. B. Walthall. 
"Intolerance," nine reels, with Mae Marsh. 

"Hearts of the World," with Dorothy Gish, Lillian Gish and Robert Harrost 
HOPP HAD LEY 

"The Vow." 

HANOVER FILM COMPANY 
"Maciste," six reels. „ 

HARPER FILM CORPORATION 

""Civilization," ten reels. 

HAWK FILM CORPORATION 
"Monster of Fate," five reels. 

HERALD FILM CORPORATION 
"Around the World in 80 Days," six reels. 

HTLLER AND WILK 

"Raffles," six reels, with John Barrymore. 
"The Battle of Gettysburg." 
"Wrath of the Gods." 
"Woman," eight reels. 

"The Silent Mystery," 15-part serial, with Francis Ford. 

HISTORIC FEATURE FILMS 

A»r. »0— "Chriatus." 

THOS. H. INCE 
•The Bargain," six reels, with W. S. Hart. 



IVAN FILM PRODUCTIONS 

"Babbling Tongues." five reels, with Grace Valentine. 
"Married in Name Only," six reels, with Milton Sills. 
"Human Clay," with Mollie King. 

"Sins of Ambition," with Wilfred Lucas and Barbara Castleton. 
"Life or Honor," seven reels, with Leah Baird. 



JEWEL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

"The Doctor and the Woman," five reels, with Mildred Harris. 
"For Husbands Only," five reels, with Mildred Harris. 
"The Geezer of Berlin.v 
"pie Sinking of the Lusitania." 
"Crashing Through to Berlin," seven parts. 



JESTER COMEDIES 
One two-reel comedy a month, with Twede Dan. 

JAMES KEANE 
"The Spreading Evil," seven reels. 

LEA-HELL COMPANY 
"Modern Mother Goose," five reels. 
"Snow White," four reels. 

MACAULEY PHOTOPLAYS, INC. 
"Whom the Gods Would Destroy." 

MASTER DRAMA FEATURES, INC. 
"Who's Your Neighbor?" seven reels, with Christine Mayo. 

MAYFATR FILM CORPORATION 
"Persuasive Peggy," six reels, with Peggy Hyland. 

B. S. MOSS 

"The Power of Evil," five reels. 

"The Girl Who Doesn't Know," five reels. 

"In the Hands of the Law," five reels. 

NEWFTELD'S PRODUCING CORPORATION 
"Alma. Where Do You Live," six reels, with Ruth McTammany. 



JOHN W. NOBLE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
"Shame," six reels, with Zena Keefe. 

OGDEN PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Lust of the Ages," five reels, with Lillian Walker. 

SIDNEY OLCOTT PLAYLETS, INC. 
"The Belgian," with Walker Whiteside and Valentine Grant. 

OVERLAND PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Hand of Fate." 
"The Russian Revolution." 
"Man's Law." 

PARAGON FILM COMPANY 
"The Whip," eight reels. 

LEONCE PERRET PRODUCTIONS 
"Stars of Glory," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli. 

"A Soul Adrift," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli. 

HARRY RAFF 
The Mad Lover," with Robert Warwick. 
The Struggle Everlasting," with Florence Reed. 
"Wanted for Murder," five reels, with Elaine Hammerstein. 

HARRY RAYER 
The Public Defender," with Frank Keen in. 
"The Hand of the Hun," four reels. 
"The Master Crook." 
"The Liberator," serial, with Maciste. 

RIALTO DE LUXE PRODUCTION! 

"The Unchastened Woman," seven reels. 
"Conquered Hearts." 

SCEEENCEAFT PICTURES 

"The Prodigal Wife," six reels, with Mary Boland. 

SELECT PHOTOPLAY COMPANY 
"Humanity," six reels. 

SELIG SPECIALS 
"The Crisis," seven reels, with Bessie Eyton._ 

"Beware of Strangers," seven reels, with Bessie Eyton and Thomas S inrrh l 
"The Garden of Allah," ten reels, with Thomas Santchi and Helen Ware. 
"Who Shall Take My Life," six reels, with Thomas Santchi and Fritxis 
Brunette. 

"The City of Purple Dreams," six reels, with Bessie Eyton and Thoamaa 
Santchi. 

FRANK J. SENG 

"Parentage." 

SELZNICK PICTURE CORP. 
"Upstairs and Down," five reels, with Olive Thomas. 

S-L PICTURES 
"Virtuous Men," with E. K. Lincoln. 

WILLIAM STOERMER ENTERPRISES 
"The Tidal Wave," eight reels. 

SOUTHERN FEATURE FILM COMPANY 
"Beyond the Law," six reels, with Emmett Dalton. 



ERNEST SHIPMAN 

LLOYD CARLETON PRODUCTION! 

"Mother, I Need You," five reels, with Enid Markey. 

UNITED FILMS PRODUCTION 

"The Crime of the Hour," five reels. 

PRIVATE FEATURE FILMS 

"Ignorance," six reels. 

AL AND FRANK JENNINGS PRODUCTIONS 
"Lady of the Dugout," six reels. 

FORD PHOTOPLAY 
"Berlin Via American," six reels, with Francis Ford. 
"A Man of Today," six reels, with Francis Ford. 
"The Fourth Generation," six reels. 



WILLIAM L. SHERRY SERVICE. 

"Romance of the Underworld," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"The Street of Seven Stars," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Out of the Night," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"The Inn of the Blue Moon," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Marriage," five reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"Red Blood and Yellow," five reels, with Bronco Billy. 

"Wild Honey," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Son of a Gun," five reels, with Broncho Billy. 

"Marriage for Convenience," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"Calibre .38." 

"Twilight," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Love and the Law," six reels. (Edgar Lewis production.) 

U. S. EXHIBITORS BOOKING CORP. 
The Zeppelin's Last Raid," five reels, with Enid Markey. 
"Those Who Pay," five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 

EDWARD WARREN PRODUCTION! 
"Souls Redeemed," with Sheldon Lewis and Charlotte Ives. 



L. LAWRENCE WEBER PRODUCING CO. 
"Weavers of Life," five reels, with Helen Hayes and Howard Hall. 

WESTERN IMPORT 
"Mickey," seven reels, with Mabel Normand. 



57 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



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Central Theatre Supply Co. 

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CHARLIE HELLSTERN 

has a 

Lobby Display 

of classy Shirts and Ties 
that look like 

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65 to 70 cents in quantity 

Fire Escape Signs 
Shipping Cases and 
other Specialties 

T. L. ROBINSON & CO. 

105 West Monroe St., Chicago 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 



The Perfect Screen 

Means PERFECT PROJECTION 



THE 



We Have It All 



SCREENS 

REPUTATION 
QUALITY 
PRICE 



Do It Now 



De berri Scenic Co. 

922 W. MONROE ST. CHICAGO 



DESIGNING - CONSULTING - SUPERVISING 



William T. Braun 

ARCHITECT 
189 W. MADISON STREET, CHICAGO 



MOTION PICTURE THEATRES AND STUDIOS 



Coburn Organs 

Perfect tonal results signify 
every instrument we make 



COBURN ORGAN COMPANY 

Builders of Quality Organs 
220 N. WASHTENAW AVENUE CHICAGO, ILL. 



St. Mary -of -the -Woods 



-College and Academy for Girls 



College 

Standard courses leading 
to degrees A. B. and B. S. 
Departments of Expression, 
Household Economics, Con- 
servatory of Music, School 
of Arts. 



Academy- 
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course, 78th Year. 

For Bulletins and Illustrat- 
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SISTER SECRETARY, Box 45 

Man; nf \\\a Wnnrlc Inil Both College and Academy are accredited by 
OU mary-OI-me- VY OOUb, Mil. tne Indiana State Department of Education 



58 



ol. VIII CHICAGO, APRIL 5, 1919 No. 15 




Theatres Battle For 
Essanay= Chaplin Films 

"There is a battle on in New York between the vaudeville factions 
over the bookings of the Chaplin reissues (Essanay). Loew signed for 
79 days.' — Variety. 



"At the Rialto Theatre on Sunday 
there was an entire day of 'Standing 
Room Only,' followed by a record 
business Monday. The audience 
which filled the house enjoyed Chap- 
lin in 'A Night in the Show,' an 
Essanay of the vintage of 1915, as 
though it had been made last week 
and released yesterday." — New York 
Review. 

"A Chaplin comedy entitled 'A Night 
in the Show,' brought shrieks of 
laughter at the Rialto." — New York 
Morning Telegraph. 

"The audiences, which filled the 
Rialto to overflowing from midday to 
midnight, put their seal of approval 
on the 'revival' with uproars of ap- 
plause and laughter." — Brooklyn 

(N. Y.) Citizen. 

"The pictures are chock full and 
brimming over with boisterous fun, 
flashes of genuine humor and the 
unique action betokening genius." — 
Exhibitors Herald. 



Coast to Coast Theatres 

Using S. R. O. Signs 
For Essanay-Chaplins 

Marcus Loczv Circuit (Nczv York) 

Rialto Theatre (New York) 

Jones, Linick & Schacfcr (Chicago) 

Ascher Brothers (Chicago) 

Lit bli tier & Trinz (Chicago) 

Stanley Booking Company (Philadelphia) 

Majestic Theatre (Detroit) 

Strand Amusement Co. (Cincinnati) 

Circle Theatre (Indianapolis) 

Star Theatre (Portland, Ore.) 

Rex Theatre (Seattle, IVash.) 

Shea's Hippodrome (Buffalo) 

Pay's Theatre (Rochester) • 

Packet Theatre (Syracuse ) 

Wonderland Theatre (Kansas City) 

New Astor Theatre (Minneapolis ) 

Majestic Theatre (St. Paul) 

Dayton Theatre (Dayton, Ohio) 

Strand Theatre ( Milzvaukee) 

Lyric Theatre (St. Louis) 

Strand Theatre (Louisville) 

Colonial Theatre (Columbus, Ohio) 

Orphcuiu Theatre (Cleveland) 

Strand Theatre (Cleveland) 

Colonial Theatre (Toledo) 

TAKE THE TIP! 





B^Ca f&"|907 



1333 Argyle St., Chicago 

George Kleine System, Distributors 
Representatives at all General Film Exchanges 




EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 





(tty newjjtamona grnedcreen 
mier latest and most sensational 
UMVERSAL SPEC/AL ATTRACTION: 



WICKED 
DARLING" 



""Y^f E have made repeated appeals to 
your office for another Priscilla 
Dea n picture," writes the Regent of 
Blackwell, Oklahoma — "we don't 



what the title of the picture is, just so it's 
a Dean! Personally, we think she has 
any of the other stars backed off the 
boards." 

HANG ON TIGHT, OKLAHOMA 

—WE'RE COMING! 
You mopped up on "THE 
WILDCAT OF PARIS," Ok- 
lahoma — but when you see 
"THE WICKED DARLING" 
and foot up your receipts 
you'll want to give Miss Pris- 
cilla Dean an oil well or two. 

You can say what you like 
about the stars of the day, 
but here's a Star and here's 
a Play that can't be stopped. 
See it sure — today. 



Hook thru your nearest 
Universal Exchange, or 
communicate with t he- 
Universal Film Mfg. Co., 
Carl Lacramle, president, 
1600 Broadway, New York 




3 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 





mm 



mm 



^RICHARD BENNETT 



DAMAGED GOODS 

The Host Sensational Film Play In Year? 






8 



Kead These 
Endorsements 
from PaWic 

telling lesson. 

"There canben^^ aveg ea t 
the perform^ew bs h 

the good tor 
created. 

of Washington 



P 



Hi 



RABBI S^gation- 
Hebrew Cong™*- serm onone- 
- lf l could preach a ^ on . 
tenth as ^^Jfcfcved the 
*ider that 1 na ,. f ° » 
SuUh of my » 

set forth. 

.«rcnN Chairman 



State Rights 
Now Selling! 



State Rights are now being 
allotted on the celebrated 
feature production "Damaged 
Goods"— the biggest box-office 
attraction of a decade — a pic- 
ture that has broken records in 
every theatre in which it has 
played. Not a print of it has 
been shown for months. All 
prints were long ago withdrawn 
from the market. Exhibitors 
have been so insistent for an 
opportunity of again showing 
"Damaged Goods" that we 
are now offering it to State 
Rights buyers. 



Read These 
testimonials 
F rom Exhibitors 



F; 



Wm 

m 



CHARLES 



at 25 cents 

Claire, Wi s . y ,c T "eatre, Eau 

"; D fmaged Good 



er 



literally f 0Us , ht t ™e. The peopj e 



at 

* a " anyth" n g ht Jik l e 
been i n the bis Jess %T 1 ha ™ 
fPProach was S -Th hC r" ear est 
a Nation.*" lth Th e Birth of 

H. A. 



few 

i 

mm 



that such a play 
screened. 



blessing 



Write! Wire! 



Applications for territory 

are now being received. Write, 
wire or phone, stating territory 
in which you are interested. 
Applications will be considered 
in the order in which they are 
received. 

American Film Co., Inc. 

6227 Broadway Chicago, HI. 



"imaged G l C,ty ' Vt ^ 

has broken all ho US /r/ f ° r ? ance - It 
< h eatre. I consult Th^ 8 for this 
feature ever produced - Stron gest 

Se„TcS A 5Stra„ a 

have 



Am 



Company ' Om " 
"We hav« 0n,aha ' Neb 



use- 



'Da 



ev en policemen to d 



Crowds.' 



to 
handle 



the 



§mmz 



- a " P °' ,Ce £ handle the 



Wiim 

caJJ D 



In"' 



"l!"hnewhen e he?teP'e-ait 



""'he ,„ orn ;;-' 'he theatre 
Js th etal koft ^ tow() 



'"<»rn i ng. 'rw,"" 1 "! °P e '»ed 
damaged Goods' 





SELECT(MD)PICTURES 



J£ YOU are a 100% American 

m you will be proud io show your patron 

*r • ' Select Pictures' great Special^ 






H 

promgal 

L D A 

^^/7/e<f//JKSE.D. HAMPTON 

Roars of laughter will greet this 
picture. 



You'll feel proud to face the happy 
crowds as they leave your theatre. 

It's jammed with funny situations 
and has some corking good ad' 
| *, vertising angles. 

Tteleased through, 

EXHIBITORS 
MUTUAL 

ROBERTSON - COLE COMPANY 
DIVISION OF FI LMiP 
BANKERS and EXPORTERS 
FOR, THE PRODUCER 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



WHEN 



ED IT 



Accuracy 




Efficiency 



YOUR rush hours are your money 
makers! Cash in on them! Keep 
that line at the ticket office moving 
and let your patrons in. 

A Lightning Changer will put 
SPEED into your service. It will 
pay out change so fast that no patron 
need even pause — hejustslaps down 
his money, takes his change, and 
moves on. There'll be no 
blockade at your doors, 
people kept out in the 
cold or perhaps impa- 
tiently deciding to go 
to the show around 
the corner instead. 



The Lightning 
Changer is accurate 
and efficient. Cashier 
just presses a key 
and change 
jingles out 
intoa metal 




cup, where it's easy to pick it up 
even with gloves on. No count- 
ing of change; no money slipping 
between the cashier's fingers; no 
annoying and delaying mistakes. 

The Palace Theatre, Milwaukee,*writes: , 
"The Changers are in constant use from 1 
p. m. till 10 p. m. . . we handle an average 
of 50,000 people weekly — the changer 
enables us to handle crowds with a speed 
absolutely impossible under 
old method — it is abso- 
lutely indispensible." 

Two are in use at the 
Riviera and two in the 
Pantheon, two of Chi- 
cago's largest and finest 
moving picture houses. 

Write for descriptive 
circular to Dept A 
You need the Light- 
ning Changer in 
your business TO- 
H DAY, if you want 
to give UP-TO- 
DATE service. 



LIGHTNING COIN CHANGER CO., 34-36 W. Lake Street, CHICAGO 



8 



DUST OFF & 



SEATS! 






SUNSHINE 

COMEDIES 

WILL BRIGHTEN YOUR PROGRAM AND BOX OFFICE 

BOOK THEM NOW 

F"0>C 

FILM CORPORATION 



12 



CHICAGO HERALD AND EXAMINER — the Soldier's Paper 





M ACL AY 

"Every Man and Woman Sh 
See the Motion Picture 

^JLAIMS made by "The Spreading Evil," the motion picture r 
endorsements of any dramatic production before the public, v* 
candidate for mayor, added his approval to the testimonials alreac! 
the Navy Josephus Daniels, U. S. Senators Chamberlain, Henderso] 
"Father of the Draft Bill," and many others have already endorse 

Mr. Hoyne said: "In a time like this when the better elements the world ovf 
the chaos into which war plunged us, it is just, proper and utterly fitting that tl 
It is fortunate that the attack should be a motion picture of the character 
and accurate warning to the youth of America. Every man and woman wl 
today, should see this picture and take its moving and thoughtful lesson 

"The picture will strip away ignorance and prudery; in will align many 
right and tells the necessary and the clean truth about an unclean plague-sp 

The BAND BOX is on Ml 

This half page advertisement appeared Thursditi 

COOK COUNTY'S FEARLESlA 

THE SPREJl 

NOW IN ITS 3rd WEEK AT BAND BOX THEATRE. VcL 



6th Floor Film Exchange Building It's d GREI VEm( 

Exclusive 

ILLINOIS— INDIANA ANfOl 

10 



the Sailor's Paper — THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1919. 



DYNE Says: 



a 



jlie 



BAND BOX 



kt the Band Box Theatre, that it possesses the most distinguished 
; strenghtened today when Maclay Hoyne, state's attorney and 
;ven by a host of nationally prominent statesmen. Secretary of 
|>merene and Thomas; Congressmen Osborne, Raker and Kahn, 
vii Washington; seeing in it an awakening force needed in this hour. 

,B striving to bring a new cleanliness, a new morality, a new humanity out of 
iJi, which has thrived on parental prudery and ignorance should be attacked. 
Jlie Spreading Evil" which I have seen and know to be a powerful, stirring 
jjes to be of help in the crucial reconstruction times that are upon the world 
Jrt. 

liless youth on the side of cleanliness and progress. It hits hard for the 
tie world today." 

lison Street, near La Salle 



■i 



1 1 



rsiirch 20th, in the Chicago Herald- Examiner 

DATE'S ATTORNEY ENDORSES 

EfiING EVIL 

VME OF ADVANCE BOOKINGS SMASHING ALL RECORDS 

PR.^)DUCTI^)N 'Phone Harrison 2451, Chicago, 111. 

^distributor 



PDUTHERN WISCONSIN 



li 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



The Eyes of the World 

W. H. Clune's Lavish Motion Picture Spectacle 



1,600,000 BOOKS SOLD 



Based on Harold Bell Wright's 
Famous Novel of Adventure 



8,000,000 READERS 



Read What the Critics Say: 

They come to see it — they stay to see it — and they 
like it. The Randolph has scored with "The Eyes of the 
World." — Kitty Kelly, Chicago Herald-Examiner. 

"THE EYES OF THE WORLD" 

Produced by W. H. Clune from the novel by Harold 
Bell Wright. Presented at the Randolph Theatre. 

An elaborate production, based on a very popular book, 
is attracting large crowds into the Randolph thearte. Ten 
reels of celluloid have been devoted to the visualizing 
of Harold Bell Wright's novel, and miles and miles of 
mountain loveliness have been caught by the camera. The 
author himself also makes his bow to his readers in the 
picture. For it is safe to^assume that the majority of 
viewers of the picture have read the story. * * » 
These scenes will stir the most hardened movie fan, and 
make him glad he came to see the picture. « » * The 
scenes are wonderful. — Genevieve Harris, Chicago Eve- 
ning Post. 

"THE EYES OF THE WORLD" 
From the Story by Harold Hell Wright, Presented at the 
Randolph 

In the spacious Randolph Theatre "The Eyes of the 
World" provides entertainment worthy of consideration. 
A "special feature production" has come to be associated 
with large mobs of people and spectacular events and 
photography. So judged this is not a special feature, but 
it is far above the average programme picture. There 
is a bigness of theme and general production. * * * 
The scenes are laid in California. Much of the action 
takes place in the mountainous regions and the majesty 
of the scenery lends its glamour to the events of the tale. 
The feature is beyond doubt valuable entertainment. — 
Virginia Dale, Chicago, Evening Journal. 

* * * The acting of Monroe Salisbury, particularly in the 
role of the cynic, continues to be the feature of the play. 
It stands out prominently like a beacon light in the 
night. Jane Novak as the heroine of the modern story 
is strongly convincing, and the remaining players are 
evenly distributed and fit their respective roles. — W. K. 
Hollander, Chicago Daily News. 



Exhibitors Who Know Report: 

H. A. Sims, 

Wisima Film Co., 

Consumers Bldg., City. 
Dear Sir: 

Without solicitation, I wish to inform you that your 
picture, "The Eyes of the World," more than doubled 
our average business at the Randolph Theatre. It looks 
like a veritable gold mine, and I only wish we had more 
like it. 

You may use this letter as you see fit in recommending 
your picture elsewhere. Yours very truly, 

(Signed) PETER J. SCHAEFER. 
Of Jones, Linick and Schaefer, Chicago. 

It affords me considerable pleasure to make you feel 
happy by advising that your splendid production, "The 
Eyes of the World," which I gave an extended, longer 
than usual run in my Strand Theatre in this city, broke 
all attendance records. The opening day we stood a line 
for almost a block despite the fact that the theatre has 
a large capacity. — W. C. Quimby, Strand Theatre, Fort 
Wayne, Ind. 

We turned people away both nights. There were at 
least 400 people that were unable to buy seats. We can 
recommend this picture as a high-class special production 
and a picture that should get money for any exhibitor. 

(Signed) BUCKLEN THEATRE, 
By Harry E. Lerner, Elkhart, Ind. 
P. S. — Our prices for matinees were 25 cents. Nights, 
■?5c, 35c and 50c. 

My patrons were all well pleased and would like to 
play a return engagement some time this spring. 

(Signed) E. J. SALISBURY, 
Manager Schelling Music Hall, Valparaiso, Ind. 

TELEGRAM 

Des Moines, la., Jan. 13, 1919. 

H. A. Sims, 

726 Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago, 111.: 

Picture surpassed expectations in every way. I put 
it over bigger than anything in history of city as produc- 
tion and box office attraction second to none. You are 
to be congratulated for owning territory. Proper ex- 
ploitation will get a mint of money. 

(Signed) ELLER METZER, 
Rialto Theatre, Des Moines, Iowa. 



NOW BOOKING 

Ohio, Indiana, Illinois 

= WIRE, WRITE OR PHONE FOR DATES IMMEDIATELY TO 

Wisima Film Company 



724 Consumers Building 



H. A. SIMS, Manager 

PHONE WABASH 1477 OR 1478 



Chicago, Illinois 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



THEopg£ADING 




HON 7ANA 



north 
PAKOTA 



5oi/TH 




PREA 



WISE DISTRIBUTORS 

Who Bought at a Fair Price and 

Are Cleaning Up Big 

SOL. L. LESSER Ca!. — Ariz. — Nev. — writes: 'Great Picture Returns will equal 'Mickey'." 

SIMEON B. GREIVER—in.-ind.-so.wis.-reports:— u Band Box Theatre, Chicago, $6,000 first week." 
R. R. ROBERTS — Va ~ w Va but M coT.-say8: — ' 'Maximum bookings, all exhibitors pleased." 
NORTHERN NEW JERSEY METRO— n. j.-advise*:— "Picture sells itself." 

W. W. PENOYAR— Mich-writes: — "Make some more like it, quick." 

STRAUBERG & BLEENDES — New GTeI^er^ewYork) side — ' ' Negotiating for more territory." 

O. E. HAUSE— t exas — Okla. — Ark. : "Send me three more prints immediately." 

GREATER NEW YORK — B D °° e k c e t d — "Has made returns of over $15,000 in nine weeks." 



FOR STATE RIGHT TERRITORY 

=^=^^= Write or Wire D. SOLOMON 

JAMES KEANE PRODUCTIONS 

220 West 42nd Street, NEW YORK CITY 



13 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

A COMMON- SENSE POLICY 



/~*EY ready for the big clean-up! It's 
bound to come sooner or later, for the 
moving picture industry is fast waking up 
to the fact that advertising in more than 
the five trade journals, which depend en- 
tirely upon the industry for support, is not 
speculating — it's wasting. There is good, 
plain common sense in the statement by 
William Sievers, concerning the practical 
restrictions in the First National Exhibitors' 
Circuit's trade journal advertising policy. 
I feel confident that this limitation of its 
advertising to the five trade journals de- 
voted entirely to the film industry is the 
order of its exhibitor members, and I as an 
. exhibitor can say to them as exhibitors 
that they have expressed the opinions and 
thoughts of the majority of our fellow 

exhibitors— HARRY CRANDALL, 

Owner of the Metropolitan, Crandall's, Knickerbocker, Meade's, 
Apollo, Savoy and Avenue Grand Theatres, Washington, D. C.; 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Pay Your Way With A Program 
Make Your Money With Special: 



99 



"The Echo of Youth 

Featuring LEAH BAIRD 

and CHARLES RICHMAN 



THE PICTURE THAT WILL PULL 
AT YOUR HEART STRINGS 



LEAH BAIRD 



en Men 



Betray 



Featuring GAIL KANE 

and STUART HOLMES 

A STIRRING DRAMA OF HUMAN 

FRAILTIES 




GAIL KANE 



SPECIALS THAT ARE SPECIALS 



Soon to be Released by 



Unity Photoplays Co., 



207 South Wabash Avenue 
CHICAGO 



15 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




in 



METRO 



16 



e 



Editorial Comment oe the WMk 

by MartinJ- QtjiGl^y 



AN exceedingly intelligent and illuminating in- 
quiry has been conducted by Mr. James D. Wil- 
liams in reference to publications actually in, and 
those which pretend to be in the motion picture field. 

Mr. Williams' inquiry has revealed an overwhelm- 
ing opinion among leading exhibitors of the country 
that the five publications committed solely to the 
motion picture trade cover the field completely and 
effectively, rendering the function of theatrical, 
vaudeville, dramatic, circus and carnival papers 
merely that of parasites upon the industry — serving 
no good purpose yet collecting a big tribute. 

The general advance of the motion picture in- 
dustry has carried it past that point at which it 
should for any reason allow itself to be imposed upon 
in reference to the vital subject of advertising. 

Journals devoted exclusively to the industry that 
intelligently and completely reflect the thought and 
news of the trade are big factors in its success. 

Sheets of no importance or standing in the trade 
that seek to obtain advertising support either by the 
scandal shaft or by offering quantities of witless puff 
are an insult to the financial judgment and the com- 
mon sense of the motion picture advertiser. 



the shipment of films into that state. It would seem 
that no other course is open. To accede to the out- 
rageous provisions of that bill would be commercial — 
and common sense — suicide. 

We are inclined to think that the responsibility for 
even allowing the consideration of such a measure 
should be put squarely up to the exhibitors of the 
state. 

With one hundred and eight theatres in the state, 
if exhibitors know so little of the influence of mold- 
ing public opinion through the screen when every 
right is on their side then they deserve to be left to 
their fate. 



AGAIN we ask : what about the exhibitors' organi- 
zation and the convention scheduled for this 
summer in St. Louis ? Is it to be another mock as- 
sembly, or are steps going to be taken before it is too 
late to bring together a representative body of theatre- 
men numerically strong enough to accomplish some- 
thing ? 



* * 



NOW Arizona comes forward with a legislative 
scheme which is a graphic example of where 
anything even remotely resembling intelligent and 
equitable censorship ends and actual persecution of 
the industry begins. 

This proposed legislation cannot even be considered 
an effort to regulate the business in Arizona : it is an 
audacious attempt to run the business. 

The bill providing for the establishment of branch 
offices in Arizona, deposits from exchanges, the filing 
of financial statements, etc., is probably the vilest 
attempt yet made by political vultures to gain a 
mastery over the business. 

It has been suggested that in event this bill be- 
comes a law, that the national exchanges withhold 



N all this discussion about the present popularity 
of war pictures a very important point is being 
overlooked. It is true that the day is definitely 
passed when any sort of a picture with a war theme 
will get over as was the case when the war spirit of 
the public was running at fever heat. 

But the war picture of real merit still holds a 
world of interest for the public. And that great por- 
tion of the public who lived in fear and trembling 
during the latter days of the war when the American 
soldier was taking a big part in the struggle will 
view a war picture at this time with greater interest 
and will not be subjected to the poignant realization 
of the dangers facing the men at the front that could 
not be escaped while the struggle was on. 



To see what their loved ones who have come safely 
have missed affords in itself a real at- 
traction. 



through 




17 




NEWS OF THE WEEK 

Energetic Fight on Censorship Bill Waged in 
Illinois House 19 

Arizona Will Be Without Pictures If Bill Is 
Signed 19 

Sunday Question Is Settled by Court in Eliza- 
beth; No Fines 20 

California Producers Lead Fight Against "Race 
Prejudice" Measure 21 

Marion Davies May Be Star in Initial Cosmo- 
politan Film 21 

Wisconsin Asked to Adopt Censorship by As- 
semblyman Oakes 22 

Brady, Irwin and Cromelin to Talk to Chicago 
Censorship Commission 23 

Select Company Purchases Timely Production 
"Bolshevism on Trial" 24 

Tourneur Completes Another Big Feature ; "The 
White Heather" 25 

William Fox Features for April Include First 
With Ray and Fair 28 

Martin Johnson Again on His Way to Film Sav- 
ages of South Seas 29 

New Orleans Board Wants Mexican Hero in 
Occasional Film 30 

"The Carter Case" Smashes Records for Book- 
ings Throughout Chicago 31 

Fairbanks Completes Propaganda Film for Fifth 
Victory Loan 31 

San Franscisco and Bakersfield Angle for Picture 
Studios 32 

Fox Missionaries in Mexico to Pave Way for 
American Films 32 

Reviews 

"The Poppy Girl's Husband," Artcraft D, five 
parts, with William S. Hart 35 

"Hit or Miss," World C-D, five parts, with Car- 
lyle Blackwell 35 

"The Silver Girl," Pathe D, five parts, with 
Frank Keenan 35 

"The Scarlet Shadow," Universal C-D, six parts, 
with Mae Murray 35 

"The Way of the Strong," Metro D, five parts, 
with Anna Q. Nillson 36 

"Thou Shalt Not," Fox D, five parts, with Eve- 
lyn Nesbit 36 

"The Turn in the Road," Exhibitors Mutual D, 
five parts, with Helen Jerome Eddy 36 

"Brass Buttons," American-Pathe C, five parts, 
with William Russell 36 



"Toton," Triangle D, six parts, with Olive 

Thomas 37 

"Experimental Marriage," Select F, five parts, 

with Constance Talmadge 37 

"Her Code of Honor," United Picture Theatres 

D, five parts, with Florence Reed 37 

"Fighting Destiny," Vitagraph D, five parts, with 

Harry T. Morey 38 

"The Light of Victory," Universal D, five parts, 

with Monroe Salisbury 38 

"The Rebellious Bride," Fox C-D, five parts, 

with Peggy Hyland 38 

"Forbidden Fires," J. Parker Reed D, six parts, 

with Louise Glaum 38 

Departments 

The Cutting Room 27 

Heraldgrams 39 

Exhibitors' Bureau 41, 42 

What the Picture Did For Me 43, 44, 45, 46, 47 

Canadian Film News 49 

Chicago Trade Events 51, 52 

Calendar of Program Publications 53, 54, 55 

The Open Market 56, 57 

Advertisers 

American Film Co 5 

Wm. T. Braun 58 

Coburn Organ Co 58 

DeBerri Scenic Co 58 

DeVry Corporation 58 

Eastman Kodak Co 58 

Essanay 2 

Fiat Laboratory 58 

Fox Film Corporation 9 

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation i 

Greiver Production 10, II 

W. W. Hodkinson 4 

James Keane Productions 13 

Lightning Coin Changer Co 8 

Marquette Piano Co 39 

Metro Pictures Corporation 16 

Pathe Exchanges, Inc 60 

Tom Phillips 58 

Robertson-Cole Co 7 

Select Pictures ". . . . 6 

Silee Film Exchange 50 

Unity Photoplays Corporation 15 

Universal Film Manufacturing Co 3 

YYisima Film Co 12 

Woodstock Typewriter Co 52 



Volume VIII 



APRIL 5, 1919 



Number 15 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND M O T O G R A P H Y 



Energetic Fight on Censorship 

Bill Waged in Illinois House 

Measure Passed by Senate, 32 to 10, Expected 
To Be Beaten by Representatives; Protest 
Is State Wide 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. — Although the senate has passed the Buck censor- 
ship bill by a vote of three to one, the measure which would establish a censoring 
body in Illinois similar to that in Pennsylvania, is not expected to have easy 
sailing in the house of representatives. 

Chicago representatives who have taken the trouble to find out the ideas 
of their constituents in regard to the bill, are opposed to it, and down state 
legislators are rapidly being aligned against it. 

The decisive defeat of a similar bill by the Nebraska legislature a few 
days ago is having a strong moral affect. 



Arizona Will Be 
Without Pictures 
If Bill Is Signed 

Law Compelling Exchanges 
In State Will End Film 
Shipments 

PHOENIX, ARIZ.— The state of Ari- 
zona is to be deprived of motion pic- 
tures if Governor Campbell affixes his 
signature to a bill which would compel 
all motion picture distributing compa- 
nies to maintain branch offices in the 
state. The bill was passed by both 
houses of the Arizona legislature March 
13th. 

The Southern California Film Ex- 
change Board of Trade, in special ses- 
sion, voted to discontinue distribution 
of pictures in Arizona if the bill be- 
comes a law, and appointed a committee 
to take the matter up with Governor 
Campbell. 

Send Committee of Twelve 

The committee appointed to take the 
matter up with the chief state executive 
comprises twelve prominent Los An- 
geles exchange officials, among them 
Dave Bershen of Universal; Charles 
Miley of Triangle, and Harvey Gross- 
man of Goldwyn. 

The proposed legislation would seri- 
ously menace the activities of the film 
industry. If the bill is signed, not only 
must exchanges be established, but a 
fee must be filed with the state treasury 
every time a production is released. No 
provision is made for a refund of this 
deposit. Also, an annual report of finan- 
cial standing to the commissioner of 
corporations would be required, the ex- 
change to stand this expense. 

May Close 100 Theatres 

The expenditure, argue the board of 
trade members, would be too great to 
both distributor and exhibitor to war- 
rant the distribution of films in that ter- 
ritory. In every way the law, if enacted, 
would be harmful to the film business. 

If Governor Campbell declines to ac- 
cept the protestations of the picture men 
and signs the bill, picture theatres in 
excess of 100 will be closed in the state 
and the vast army of fans who regularly 
patronize the "canned" drama will be 
forced to seek other amusement. 



Censorship Defeat in 

Nebraska Is Decisive 

OMAHA, NEB.— That censorship has 
been killed as far as Nebraska is con- 
cerned for the next ten years is the 
belief of exchange men and motion pic- 
ture fans. 

Just before consideration of the mea- 
sure was postponed indefinitely by the 
house March 18, a test vote was taken on 
a motion to advance the bill to third 
reading. The motion lost, 62 to 20. The 
motion to postpone it indefinitely was 
then carried. 



Osso Goes to France 

Adolph Osso, who is head of the Per- 
ret Picture Co., landed in France on 
March 26, which is his native country. 
Mr. Osso is making a business trip in the 
interests of his firm and expects to be in 
Europe for about eight weeks. 



The senate machine passed the Buck 
bill by a vote of 32 to 10, Chicago sena- 
tors protesting in vain. Powerful influ- 
ences had apparently been at work and 
the decisiveness of the vote was - not 
unexpected. 

Word of the senate's action aroused a 
strong protest in Chicago from city offi- 
cials and members of the council's cen- 
sorship commission. 

Chicagoans in Protest 

"The senate did not act in good faith 
with us," declared Chairman Timothy D. 
Hurley. "When we appeared before their 
committee we were promised Chicago 
would be given the right to recensor 
films approved by the proposed state 
board. 

"The motion picture problem is the 
greatest educational problem facing our 
people today. It is a greater problem 
than the schools or the church. Chicago 
must be allowed to continue its own cen- 
sorship, because of peculiar conditions 
here. 

"What would be proper for a small 
downstate community might be objec- 
tionable to a great portion of our 3,000,- 
000 citizens." 

Second Deputy Superintendent of Po- 
lice Frazier indorsed Mr. Hurley's con- 
tentions. 

Newspapers Fight Measure 

Practically all of the Chicago news- 
papers and the majority of the downstate 
dailies have entered the fight against the 
censorship bill, condemning it in editor- 
ials and calling upon representatives to 
defeat it. 

Exhibitors of the state have been work- 
ing quietly for weeks and are now re- 
doubling their effort to win votes against 
the measure in the house. 

Springfield motion picture theater men 
are prepared to fight the bills and will 
take the lead in the statewide opposition. 
Harry Loper, manager of the Lyric the- 
atre, yesterday characterized the bill as 
vicious legislation not wanted by the 
thousands of Illinois people who patron- 
ize the picture shows, and intended to 
place in the hands of a few men the right 
to decide what kind of films the people 
of the state shall see. 

People Their Own Censors 

"The people want to be their own cen- 
sors," declared Loper, "and such bills 
are not favored by one in a hundred of 
the people who enjoy a good motion pic- 
ture." 



It is significant, a theatre man pointed 
out, that Buck, who sponsored the senate 
bill, and Havill, who is the author of the 
house bill, are from Monmouth and 
Mount Carmel, towns of about 6,000 and 
2,000. 



Propose Deputy Censor 

For Pittsburg Office 

HARRISBURG, PA.— Senator Mear- 
kle has offered a bill in the senate creat- 
ing the position of deputy censor of 
motion picture films in Pittsburg. The 
measure is designed to relieve the film 
exhibitors of the western end of the state 
of many embarrassments through lack 
of proper co-operation between the board 
of censors here and their local inspectors 
and failure of the railroads and express 
companies to make prompt deliveries of 
films that have been O. K.'d by the cen- 
sors. 



Sunday Bill Threatened 

(Special to the HERALD) 

ALBANY, N. Y.— Although the Sun- 
day opening bill may be reported favor- 
ably out of committee, political dopesters 
declare its chances of passage are dubi- 
ous. 



I'liiiiiiiiiiiini ii!Iii:i;iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!!i^ 

| 'Herald' Fills the Bill, 

Says Illinois Showman § 

AMERICAN THEATRE 
Rock Island, III. 
I To EXHIBITORS HERALD I 

AND MOTOGRAPHY: 

I wish to congratulate you on 1 
j the very good paper you are § 
| placing in my hands. 

I heartily endorse your paper § 
| for every exhibitor.. I feel the | 
| HERALD tills my every require- I 
| ntent for tiews. 

Your exhibitors advertising 1 
| bureau fills a long-felt want. 

Wishing you continued suc- 
| cess, I am, 

Very truly yours, 
j (Signed) John Kolctis, Prop., § 
American Theatre, 
Rock Island, III. 

winiiiim miiDM mmnn unmnmniiiiunttimiiuuintti itninuummnuni iiiimni 



19 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Sunday Question Is 
Settled by Court in 
Elizabeth; No Fines 
Theatre Men Released But 
Told That Law Must 
Be Obeyed 

ELIZABETH, N. J.— The situation 
resulting from the opening of the thea- 
tres in this city on the first three Sun- 
days in February for the exhibition of 
moving pictures was disposed of finally, 
when Judge Carlton B. Pierce, in the 
Court of Special Sessions, suspended 
sentence on nine of the amusement pro- 
moters. The other three who were in- 
dicted were arraigned in court previously 
and were dealt with in the same manner. 

Retract Former Pleas 

All of the men were allowed to re- 
tract previous pleas of not guilty and 
to plead non vult to the indictments re- 
turned by the January grand jury charg- 
ing them with being technically guilty 
of maintaining disorderly houses. 

Judge Pierce, before passing sentence, 
said that he intended to treat all the 
cases alike, because he was of the opin- 
ion that the law had been upheld and 
that it had not been wilfully violated in 
the first place. He referred again to 
what he said he understood to have been 
an understanding between the theatre 
men and the city authorities. If the de- 
fendants had put up a fight he would 
have been more severe in sentencing 
them, he said. 

Those Before the Court 

Those arraigned were: 

Edward M. Hart, manager Proctor's 
East Jersey Street Theatre, 1146 East 
Jersey street. 

Herman Stern, proprietor of the Ave- 
nue Theatre, 508 Elizabeth avenue. 

Martin P. Cross, proprietor of the 
Royal Theatre, 843 Elizabeth avenue. 

Philip Cohen and John Fine, repre- 
senting the City Amusement Company, 

^iiiiiin iniiiiiniiitimiiiinnif iiitiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiirii niniiii innirifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiitiiiifiii iiiim^ 

| 'Herald' Gets Tribute 

| From Exchange Manager | 

FOX FILM CORP. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
| To EXHIBITORS HERALD I 
AND MOTOGRAPHY: 
It is a pleasure for me to re- j 
| nezv my subscription to the Her- | 
| ai.d. | 
/ have been following the § 
j same ivith keenest interest since | 
| my arrival in the West and I § 
| confess if you had cut me off § 
| your mailing list I would become j 
| lonesome from the lack of news I 
| that othenvisc I am able to ob- | 
| tain from your worth - zvhile § 
j journal. 

Very truly yours, . j 

(Signed) M. J. Weisfeld, 
Branch Manager, 

Fox Film Corp. 

Fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiin mi minim n mi minimi n mi iiimmi iM 



owners of the Garden Theatre, 51 Broad 
street. 

Walter D. Schafer, manager of the Fox 
Theatre, 1121 Elizabeth avenue. 

William Madden, manager of Proc- 
tor's Broad Street Theatre, 19 Broad 
street. 

Harry Weiner and Fred Sheppard, 
Gaiety, Bond street. 



Many Theatre Sales 
Occur During Week 

Considerable activity in the sale of 
picture theatres and theatre leases has 
been noticed during the past few days. 

The theatre at Twenty-fifth street and 
Allegheny avenue, Philadelphia, has been 
sold by Fred G. Nixon-Nirdlinger to the 
West Allegheny Avenue Realty Com- 
pany. 

A. W. Suavely, treasurer of the Her- 
shey Bank, has purchased the Iroquois 
Theatre, at Palmyra, Pa., from Julius 
Slimer. 

Cal Moyer and C. F. McQuilkin have 
bought the Majestic Theatre, at Enid, 
Okla., from Roy Wirt. 

F. Ray Hancock, proprietor of the 
Arcade, at Charlotte, Mich., has pur- 
chased the Columbia Theatre at Grand 
Rapids, Mich., and after extensive re- 
modeling will rename it the Temple. 

James A. Carrier has sold the lease, 
and equipment of the Avon Theatre at 
Decatur to the Avon Amusement Com- 
pany, which will put R. L. LaVoise in 
charge as manager. 



Sunday Theatre Bill Is 

Sidetracked at Trenton 

TRENTON, N. J.— Just as the liberal 
Sunday advocates were assuming that 
Assemblyman Hyland's bill to permit 
motion pictures, theatres, baseball and 
other amusements on Sundays on a ref- 
erendum vote in municipalities would 
come to a vote this week, they were 
rudely jarred last Friday. 

Before the house of assembly adjourned 
for the week Assemblyman Warner, Re- 
publican, of Union, moved that the Hy- 
land bill, which had been reported in the 
morning without recommendation, be 
sent back to the committee on social wel- 
fare for a hearing. This motion pre- 
vailed. Whether the bill will ever come 
out again is a question. 

Since the legislature voted against the 
ratification of the federal dry amend- 
ment, much pressure has been exerted 
against the open Sunday bill by Republi- 
cans, who say that the Republicans in 
some sections of the state have already 
enough to answer for to the church peo- 
ple and that the party had better not 
add to its troubles by standing for a 
more liberal Sunday. 



Appointed Manager 

Arthur Moskowitz, who recently re- 
turned from overseas, where he has been 
serving with the 77th Division, has been 
appointed manager of Loew's Garrick 
theatre, St. Louis, Mo., which Mr. Loew 
took over a few weeks ago and which 
has proved to be a bonanza ever since 
the opening. Mr. Moskowitz has had 
a wide experience in the managerial end 
for Loew's circuits. 




SAMUEL L. ROTHAPFEL 
Who is giving personal attention to details 
of his Rothapfel Unit Program to be dis- 
tributed by Independent Sales Corp. 



"Big Four" Will Build 

Theatre Chain Abroad 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— The United 
Artists' Corporation, composed of Mary 
Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Charlie 
Chaplin and D. W. Griffith, has an- 
nounced plans to build a chain of 
American style theatres through all 
of the allied and neutral countries of 
Europe for the production of American- 
made motion pictures. Work on the con- 
struction of the chain of playhouses, it 
was declared, will be begun within the 
next few months. 

The first of the new theatres will be 
constructed in London, where the corpo- 
ration has already opened general offices 
for the distribution of films. In succes- 
sion, new theatres will be built in Glas- 
gow, Dublin, Paris, Stockholm, Copen- 
hagen, Lisbon and Madrid, and later it 
is planned to branch out to Petrograd 
and Brussels. 



Seek Missing Lieutenant 

Motion picture exhibitors are asked 
to assist in the search for Lieut. Wil- 
liam H. Stuart, son of Duncan S. Stuart, 
12 Maple street, Oneonta, N. Y., who 
disappeared in New York City, Janu- 
ary 18. He is 27 years old; returned 
from overseas January 13, receiving his 
honorable discharge at Washington. He 
is 5 feet 8 inches tall, has dark brown 
hair and blue eyes and a ruddy complex- 
ion. He has a brown mole on the left 
side of his nose. He has three gold 
service chevrons on his sleeve if in uni- 
form. 



Ministers Urge Boycott 

At the Philadelphia conference of the 
M. E. church all members were urged to 
boycott any and all motion picture places 
which are appealing for the passage of 
the open Sunday bill now before the 
legislature. This would seem to be in 
restraint of trade. The Hatters' Union 
was fined for instigating a boycott a year 
or two ago, which the court ruled was 
unlawful, unconstitutional and in re- 
straint of trade. 



?0 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



California Producers Lead Fight 

Against "Race Prejudice'' Measure 

Anderson Bill Declared by Newspapers to Be 
Attack on Free Speech and Freedom of Press 



Marion Davies May 
Be Star in Initial 
Cosmopolitan Film 
Trade Gossip Indicates That 
Hearst Will Feature 
Select Star 

Marion Davies is to be featured in the 
first of the Cosmopolitan Productions, 
to be produced by William R. Hearst 
and distributed by the Famous Players- 
Lasky Comporation, according to report. 

"Getting Mary Married," the comedy- 
drama just completed under the direc- 
tion of Allan Dwan, and now in the cut- 
ting stage, is reported to be the last 
Davies picture to be distributed by the 
Select Pictures Corporation. 

First information tending towards 
verification of the gossip came in the 
form of a press announcement from Rose 
Shulsinger, 812 Times building, New 
York, who has been handling publicity 
for the Marion Davies Film Corporation. 

It is as follows: 

"Marion Davies, who has been resting two weeks, 
following the release by Select Pictures bf "The 
Belle of New York," and the cutting by Allan Dwan 
of her comedy drama, "Getting Mary Married," 
will start work next week in the Paragon Studio, 
Fort Lee, which has just been leased for her use on 
a pretentious new production directed by Allan 
Dwan, the title of which has not yet been made 
public, according to C. F. Zittel, head of the Marion 
Davies Film Corporation. It is believed that the 
new story will be the screen version of a well- 
known novel, and the supporting cast will be an 
all-star one." 

The leasing of the Paragon studios; 
the fact that Allan Dwan is directing 
the picture: the announcement coming 
from Mr. Zittell, and the suggestion of 
a well known novel, recalls the follow- 
ing paragraph from the announcement 
made by Mr. Zittel a week ago of the 
formation of Cosmopolitan Productions: 

"The first film will be "The Dark Star." adapted 
from Robert W. Chahmers' story. We have leased 
the Pagagon studio in New Jersey for the taking 
of this film. Allan Dwan, recognized as one of the 
leaders in the production of film classics, will be 
director-in-chief. 

Miss Davies has finished four pictures 
for Select — "Cecilia of the Pink Roses," 
"The Burden of Proof," "The Belle of 
New York," and "Getting Mary Mar- 
ried." 



Corp. Simone Back 

Corporal Peter C. E. Simone, the son 
of Charles Simone, General Film Com- 
pany branch manager, Albany, N. Y., has 
just returned to America. He is a mem- 
ber of the 26th Division and is now re- 
cuperating at the government hospital, 
Grand Central Palace, New York, from 
wounds received in battle. Corporal 
Simone is reported to be doing nicely 
and there is a possibility of his being 
restored to health sufficiently to enable 
him to resume his laboratory work for 
the Universal Film Company, in the 
near future. 



Honor Harry Knapp 

Harry L. Knapp, dramatic critic of the 
Philadelphia Inquirer, who was lately ap- 
pointed chairman of the board of cen- 
sors for the state of Pennsylvania, was 
tendered a dinner by newspaper friends 
at the Bellvue-Stratford hotel, Philadel- 
phia, on March 26. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL.— Consider- 
ation of the bill introduced by Senator 
Anderson in the California legislature 
to prevent the production of pictures 
or the publication of cartoons or illus- 
trations that tend to incite race ha- 
tred has been postponed to Wednes- 
day, April 2. 

A storm of protest against the pas- 
sage of the measure has broken out 
in all parts of the state. Motion pic- 
ture producers are taking a leading 
part in the fight on the bill and are 
being joined by leading newspapers 
of the state. 

The bill is generally construed as 
being aimed at D. W. Griffith's "The 
Birth of a Nation." Its terms are so 



broad, however, that newspapers contend 
it will take the "life out of cartoons and 
pictures." 

The Los Angeles Examiner brands the 
measure as "an attack on free speech and 
press." 

Protest Halts Measure 

The bill has passed from committee 
and was scheduled to come up for 
passage in the senate this week. An 
energetic protest, however, secured con- 
sent to the delay. 

Opponents declare the bill is in viola- 
tion of the constitutional right of free 
speech, and that it would act as a bludgeon 
against the production of motion pic- 
tures and the publication of magazines 
or newspapers. 

The text of the bill, which is No. 
311A, is as follows: 



F. B. Warren Joins Hodkinson Corp. 

(Special to the Herald) 

NEW YORK, Mardh 24. — W. W. Hodkinson today announced election of F. B. 
Warren as vice-president of the W. W. Hodkinson Corporation, effective April 1. 

"This means my retirement as vice-president and a director of the Goldwyn 
Distributing Corporation," said Mr. Warren in reference to the announcement of 
Mr. Hodkinson. ."I have retained my stock in the Goldwyn company and in fact 
bought more the day of my retirement." 

In connection with the appointment of Mr. Warren it is learned that the 
Hodkinson corporation has perfected plans for greatly widening its scope and 
has already completed negotiations for increased product. 

It is emphatically denied that the appointment of Mr. Warren means any 
alliance between the Goldwyn and the Hodkinson companies. 

Mr. Warren has been associated with the Goldwyn company since its organi- 
zation and is credited with the direction of its publicity and advertising activities, 
which are generally credited with setting an exceedingly high standard. 

Recently Mr. Warren has been more closely connected with the distribution 
and sales organization activities of the Goldwyn company and has established 
a strong reputation in this work. 



WILL APPEAR TOGETHER IN "OH, BOY! 




.iun<> < ii|>ri<-<- im<l CrciKiiton ii:ii<\ »t:ir» <>f tin- tirst Cupellanl production to !>«• distributed 
through Pathe. It will 1><- » ■creen version of the ■ucoeaaful musical comedy. 

21 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

FOUR STARS OF THE UNIVERSAL GALAXY 




Left to Right — Monroe Salisbury, .soon to appear in "The Great White Darkness." Dorothy Phillips, who scored a hit in "The Heart 
of Humanity." Mary MacLaren, star of "The Amazing Wife," and Eddie Polo, popular serial star. 



Wisconsin Asked to 
Adopt Censorship by 
Assemblyman Oakes 
Proposed Law Similar to 
Measures in Other Central 
States 

MADISON, WIS.— A bill providing 
for the regulation of motion films, stere- 
opticon views or slides, and providing 
for a method of examination and ap- 
proval has been offered in the lower 
house by Assemblyman George Oakes of 
St. Croix county. The bill tends to 
create a committee composed of three 
residents and citizens of Wisconsin "well 
qualified by education and experience 
to act as censors under this act." These 
members shall be appointed by the gov- 
ernor for a term of three years. The 
board shall be known as the "Wiscon- 
sin State Board of Censors." The bill 
then provides that the board "shall ex- 
amine or supervise the examination of 
all firms, reels or views to be exhibited 
in Wisconsin; and shall approve such 
films, reels or views which are moral and 
proper; and shall disapprove such as are 
sacrilegious, obscene, indecent, or im- 
moral, or such as tend, in the judgment 
of the board, to debase or corrupt 
morals." 

Salary to Be $2,500 

The board is directed to keep a record 
of all examinations made of films and 
report in writing annually to the gov- 
ernor giving a statement showing all 
prosecutions for violations of the act. 
The members of the board shall receive 
an annual salary of $2,500 each. Rooms 
shall be provided in the State Capitol for 
the board. For the examination of each 
film the bill provides that a fee shall be 
charged of $2 for 1,200 lineal feet of 
film and $1 for each duplicate or print 
thereof. All fees received shall be paid 
into the State Treasury. The members 
of the board and their employees are 
directed and empowered to make inspec- 
tions of moving picture houses to ascer- 



tain whether the films used are in com- 
pliance with the statutes. 

Provides for Fines 

Any person who shall violate any of 
the provisions of the measure shall pay 
a fine of not less than $25 or more than 
$50 for the first offense. If any person 
shall fail to exhibit on the screen the 
"approved seal" as issued by the board 
he shall be subjected to a fine of not 
less than $10 or more than $20. The 
provisions of this measure are not to 
apply to exhibitions of or use of films, 
reels, or views, for purely educational, 
charitable, fraternal, or religious pur- 
poses, by any religious association, fra- 
ternal society, library, museum, public 
school or private school of learning. If 
the measure passes it is to take effect im- 
mediately. 



W. A. Bach Resigns Post 

With Hodkinson Co. 

W. A. Bach, sales manager for the W. 
W. Hodkinson Corporation, resigned his 
position with that concern March 21. 
Mr. Bach, who originally entered the 
firm business some three years ago with 
the Universal Company, in Canada, was 
promoted to sales manager of the Hod- 
kinson Company upon the resignation of 
C. E. Shurtleff some time ago. 

Beyond the statement that he contem- 
plated a trip to Canada, Mr. Bach would 
make no statement at this time, saying 
that there was nothing to say of any in- 
terest, but that later an announcement 
would be forthcoming. Rumor couples 
the name of Bach with the new corpora- 
tion under the control of Mr. Shurtleff 
for the production of the Jack London 
stories and the works of other noted 
authors. 



Long Island City Studio 

The Famous Players-Lasky Corpora- 
tion plans to erect a studio in Long 1 
Island City. It is said that the .com- 
pany will make this the most complete 
and up-to-date institution of its kind in 
this country. 

22 



M. P. Business Men 

Seek Club Quarters 

Members of the committee appointed 
to look into matters appertaining to the 
new club of the motion picture indus- 
try, which came into being through a 
suggestion of C. F. Zittell at a recent 
dinner given to William A. Brady, in 
York, and at which time $20,470 was col- 
lected from among those present, held a 
meeting at Sherry's last week, and im- 
portant plans were discussed and de- 
cided upon. 

The first question taken up was the 
name under which the club should be 
known and the title decided upon was 
the Motion Picture Business Men's Club. 

C. F. Zittell appointed a subcommit- 
tee, consisting of himself, Adolph Zukor, 
J. L. Brulatour, J. Stuart Blackton and 
P. L. Waters to find suitable quarters 
for the club. According to present plans 
a suite of six or seven rooms, in one of 
the big hotels, will be engaged for this 
purpose. It was also decided that the 
membership is to be limited to 100 resi- 
dent members. 

This club has no connection and is 
not affiliated in any way with any other 
club, and is not to be confounded with 
the Motion Picture Club of America. 

New contributions have been received 
from P. L. Waters, $1,000; William Fox, 
$1,000, and Paul Brunet, for Pathe, $1,000. 



Pennsylvania Exhibitors 

Active for Sunday Bill 

PITTSBURGH, PA.— Meetings in all 
parts of the state are being conducted 
by motion picture exhibitors to convince 
the legislature that the demand for the 
Sunday opening of theatres is a popular 
one. 

Representative William R. Rorke of 
Philadelphia, who introduced the bill, 
is taking an active part in the campaign. 



Serial Under Way 

Work is progressing rapidly on the 
Pearl White-Robert W. Chambers serial, 
"In Secret," which is being produced by 
George B. Seitz, Inc., for distribution 
through Pathe. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Brady, Irwin and Cromelin to Talk 
To Chicago Censorship Commission 

Officials of N. A.M.P.I. Will Present Producers' 
Side of Question; D. W. Griffith Represen- 
tative Gives His Opinions 

Why the motion picture producers oppose censorship of films is to be 
told by the Chicago Censorship Commission Friday afternoon, when William 
A. Brady, Walter E. Irwin and Paul H. Cromelin, prominent figures in the 
National Association of the Motion Picture Industry, will appear before that 
body. 

It will be the first time the industry has been officially represented at a 
hearing of the board, although several individuals connected with the produc- 
tion, distribution, or exhibition of pictures have voiced their opinions at previous 
sessions. 



Fire at Prizma Studio 

Threatens Valued Film 

JERSEY CITY, N. J.— A defective flue 
in the chemical building adjoining the 
main plant of Prizma, Incorporated, at 
3193 Boulevard, Jersey City, was the 
cause of what might have been a bad fire 
Wednesday afternoon, March 19, but for 
the quick action of the Jersey City fire 
department. The fire barely missed 
vaults containing more than $300,000 
worth of original color negatives taken 
all over the world by Prizma camera 
men during the past two years. The loss 
of these negatives, most of which could 
never be replaced, would, of course, seri- 
ously have delayed the production of 
Prizma color pictures. 

The fire was quickly gotten under con- 
trol, however, and it is announced today 
that the damage was slight and will not 
delay production. 



Thousands Petition 

For Sunday Theatre 

DAYTON, OHIO.— Twenty-five thou- 
sand names have already been secured to 
petitions by the Miami Valley Motion 
Picture Exhibitors' League as an in- 
dorsement of the Banker bill, which has 
for its purpose the legalizing of picture 
shows Sunday afternoons and evenings. 

The league expects to add many thou- 
sand more names to its petitions within 
the next few days. More than two hun- 
dred telegrams have been sent to various 
legislators asking their support of the 
bill. 



New English Films 

Harry Maze Jenks, president of the 
Harma Productions, Inc., of 101 Ward- 
our street, London, W. I., is stopping at 
the Hotel Astor. Mr. Jenks brought 
with him several English productions 
which he is trying to place on the 
market. 




LEAH IS \ licit 

Starred by Harry Haver in "Am a Man 
Thinks," from AukunIum Thomas' l*lay, 
ItrNt Of a series of four Star Specials 
distributed by W. W. Hodklnson. 



Mr. Brady, president of the N. A. M. 
P. I., formerly head of the World Film 
Corporation, and now an independent 
producer, is considered one of the fore- 
most authorities on censorship in the 
country, having studied the problem for 
many years. 

Mr. Irwin is chairman of the executive 
committee of the N. A. M. P. I., and one 
of the officers of the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corporation. Mr. Cromelin is a 
director of N. A. M. P. I., and president 
of the Inter-Ocean Film Company. 

Arthur Ryan Gives Talk 

Arthur Ryan, personal representative 
of D. W. Griffith, and' associated in the 
United Artists' Corporation, of which Mr. 
Griffith, Mary Pickford, Charles Chaplin, 
and William S. Hart are members, and 
former Secretary of the Treasury Wil- 
liam G. McAdoo is chief counsel, ap- 
peared before the censorship commis- 
sion last Friday to voice Mr. Griffith's 
opposition to censorship. 

"Mr. Griffith is unalterably opposed to 
censorship," declared Mr. Ryan. "The 
question is a broad one, but it simmers 
down to this. You cannot have a hero 
with a villain, and you cannot have a pic- 
ture without red blood in it. 

"The dime novel and the melodrama 
disappeared a few years ago. They went 
into the movies. But they are rapidly 
being eliminated, so rapidly that it is 
surprising. Let the motion picture indus- 
try work out its own destinies and you 
will have more satisfactory results. 

Industry Growing Up 

"There is lots of trash among the pic- 
tures being made, but you must remem- 
ber that pictures started as a nickel en- 
tertainment and have grown, up to a $2 
entertainment in some instances. Mr. 
Griffith was the first producer to make a 
$2 picture. 

"If you permit censorship boards, 
which know nothing about art, to cut 
into pictures which are works of art, you 
are going to stultify art and ruin the 
fourth biggest industry in this country, 
the fifth biggest in the world, and the 
largest in California. 

"It is Mr. Griffith's aim to give the 
people bigger and better productions. 
Bad productions are being eliminated by 
the public. Take 'Salome' for instance. 
The public sat upon it and it was a fail- 
ure. I understand that its producers 
have lost half a million dollars on it. 
Objects to Censorship 

"Mr. Griffith and the other big pro- 
ducers want all the co-operation they can 
have in improving the quality of pictures, 



but they don't want to be harassed by 
censorship boards." 

Mr. Ryan declared that Mr. Griffith 
had never produced a picture to which 
censors could object, and that Mary 
Pickford, Charles Chaplin and William 
S. Hart had never appeared in pictures 
which censors could object to. 

He declared that the difficulty of cen- 
sorship is the question, "What should be 
censored?" and "Who will censor it?" 

"Give the industry three or four more 
years and it will cleanse itself," he con- 
cluded. 

Following his talk, members of the 
board questioned him in regard to vari- 
ous parts of his address and questions 
arising in connection with censorship. 



Hon. Littleton to Attend 

{Special to the HERALD) 
NEW YORK.— Martin W. Littleton, 
famous attorney, and Gabriel L. Hess, 
chairman of the Censorship Committee 
of the N. A. M. P. I., will attend the 
hearing before the Chicago Censorship 
Commission on Friday afternoon. 




VICTOR KHr.MI-.lt 
Who has established Offices In tfevi 
York and will handle a series 
of pictures on a state 
rights basis. 



23 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Select Company Purchases Timely 
Production "Bolshevism on Trial" 

Film Dealing With Problem Now Facing Entire 
World Is Completed and Will Be 
Extensively Exploited 



"Bolshevism on Trial" is the astound- 
ing title of the sensational new timely 
special production which Select Pictures 
Corporation has drawn for itself from 
the year's big attractions. 

The photodrama, as its title implies, 
deals with that most burning question 
of the day, the spread of Bolshevism. 
But the picture is not propaganda, it is 
drama, but drama every reel of which 
becomes more convincingly an addition 
to the discussion pro and con of the 
Bolshevistic bogey. 

Film is Being Printed. 

The production work on "Bolshevism 
on Trial' has been entirely completed 
and this feature is now in the printing 
stage. Select is bending every effort to 
putting prints on the market at once, and 
Select's exchanges throughout the 
United States and Canada have been 
authorized to accept immediate play- 
dates. No publication date is being set 
as prints will be furnished to the first- 
run customers as fast as they can be 
completed, and the custom of first come 
first served will be observed. 

President Lewis J. Selznick and other 
officials of the Select Corporation are so 
firmly convinced that in "Bolshevism on 
Trial" they have one of the biggest spe- 
cial productions of recent years that they 
have arranged for the most far-reaching 
campaign of advertising and publicity 
that has yet been put behind any Select 
Picture's offering — thus backing their 
judgment with a liberal supply of funds 
from Select's war chest. 



A contract has already been signed for 
a large electric light sign at 46th Street 
and Broadway and orders given for a 
thorough billboard campaign which will 
plaster New York and vicinity with 
twenty-four sheets. Besides this, ad- 
vertising in trade journals and news- 
papers has been planned on a scale far 
exceeding anything Select has done 
before. 

Believe Picture is Bonanza. 

With so timely a subject as Bolshev- 
ism, presented in as well made a photo- 
play as "Bolshevism on Trial," Select 
officials feel that they have a production 
which should prove a bonanza. More- 
over, Select Pictures will be the first 
in the field with a photodrama dealing 
with this subject, and it is felt that 
exhibitors will find that their patrons 
have an enormous interest in this sub- 
ject which will reap a golden harvest 
for the theatres when this picture is » 
shown. Every aid that can be extended 
to exhibitors, therefore, has been plan- 
ned, and the Select officials will stand 
behind each presentation and endeavor 
to assist the theatre making it to obtain 
results at the boxoffice commensurate 
with the importance of the undertaking. 

The basic story from which "Bolshev- 
ism on Trial" was fabricated is contained 
in Thomas Dixon's successful novel 
"Comrades," but the story has been 
adapted and developed so as to meet 
the present international situation. The 
story that is told on the screen is an 
intensively human and thrilling drama 



suiuiuiuuiiuuiittiuiiiiiiiuiiinuiiiiiiiuiiuiiiiiiuiuiiniun 

| 'Herald' Is Commended j 
By Missouri Showman j 

1 To EXHIBITORS HERALD | 
AND MOTOGRAPHY: 
Your publication is what we | 
| have been looking for. You de- j 
1 liver the GOODS. 

{Signed) A. H. Thost, 
Gem Theatre, 
Frcdcricktown, Mo. 

■■iitiitiiiiiiriiiilliitriiiiiiiiiiMitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiixiiiiiiiiiiiiiTTiiiiijriiiiiiiiiiiitJiiiriiiiiiiiiirTtriiiiririiKiTiiiiiiTiriii^ 
of Americans of the average type. "Bol- 
shevism on Trial" is not a war picture 
and has no war scenes in it, the 
closest approach being the rapid fire 
gun of a United States Navy Coast 
Patrol boat which is called into action. 
The scenes are laid in a community on 
this side of the Atlantic, not in Europe. 
The men and women who find them- 
selves soon engulfed in the vortex of a 
Titanic struggle are such men and 
women as can be gathered into a Con- 
vention Hall in any American city. There 
is a love story, of course — for there is a 
beautiful and charming girl and a clean- 
cut young man of high ideals — and the 
situation is inevitable. But aside from 
the human touches which vivify and 
lighten the intensely dramatic subject 
through the entire length of its six 
reels, there is one big, moving, driving 
theme which pushes steadily on from 
start to finish, and that is the struggle 
of Bolshevism to assert itself and to 
dominate. How the play handles this 
is best left to be told by the reviewers. 
Produced by Mayflower. 

"Bolshevism on Trial' was produced 
by the Mayflower Photoplay Corpora- 
tion, of which Isaac Wolper is President. 
Its sole distribution in the United States 
and Canada lies in the hands of Select 
Pictures Corporation. Harry Chandlee 
has received credit for the strong con- 
tinuity and also for the exceptionally 
interesting, titles which are poticeable 
throughout the photoplay. 

Robert Fraser, "Leslie Stowe, Howard 
Truesdell, Valda Valkyrien and Ethel 
Wright are prominent members of the 
cast, which is of general excellence, and 
which proves' itself wholly equal to the 
calls upon it made by the story. 



Stop at Pescos Valley 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Lewis are so- 
journing at Pescos Valley, near Artesia, 
New Mexico. Their stay at this point is 
both for health and business. Pescos 
Valley has one of the largest fresh water 
gusher wells in the world located in its 
center. The enactment of the prohibi- 
tion amendment probably has nothing 
to do with Mr. Lewis picking this spot 
for safety's sake, but it shows fore- 
thought. 



Legalize Sunday Shows 

HARTFORD, CONN.— The Connecti- 
cut Senate has passed the Sunday: open- 
ing Act which will legalize Sunday-show- 
ings in that state. The House is to take 
up the measure today and favorable ac- 
tion is anticipated. A bill legalizing Sun- 
day 6penings was passed last year, but 
was vetoed by the Governor. It is un- 
derstood that the Governor has no ob- 
jections at trws time. 




24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Tourneur Completes 
Another Big Feature, 
"The White Heather" 

Noted French Director's First 
California Production — 
Former Stage Success 

"The White Heather," Maurice Tour- 
neur's latest production which will have 
its premiere within a few weeks at a 
leading New York theatre, marks the 
director's first California production. 

Mr. Tourneur had long felt the need 
of a bigger canvas upon which to work 
and he decided to produce several photo- 
dramas on the coast. "The White 
Heather" proves the value of the direc- 
tor's judgment. Screen observers who 
have seen this latest feature at private 
showings declare it to be the biggest 
thing yet done by Mr. Tourneur. 

Adapted Stage Play 

"The White Heather" is adapted from 
Cecil Raleigh and Henry Hamilton's 
melodrama, which had a sensational 
stage success at the Drury Lane Theatre, 
London, and later at the Academy of 
Music, New York. It has one of the 
most remarkable punches ever screened, 
according to observers, and is staged 
with all the beauty, discrimination and 
artistic judgment which fans and exhi- 
bitors have come to expect in a Tour- 
neur production. 

Mabel Ballin has the leading feminine 
role in the screen version of "The White 
Heather," the part that was created in 
the New York footlight production by 
Amelia Bingham. Ralph Graves has the 
leading male role; H. E. Herbert is the 
"heavy," and such excellent players as 
Jack Gilbert, Spottiswood Aitken, and 
Ben Alexander appear in the photoplay. 

Unique Photographic Effects 

There are any number of singularly 
beautiful "shots" in "The White Heather" 
among the more notable being Mr. 
Tourneur's remarkable scenes in the 
shims of London. 

The newest invention of the William- 
son Brothers, which permits of a new 
sort of sub-sea photography, is em- 

:.' f' *rr , • ' *.' " ' : ~" f ,the 

];e consider this picture a nivver I 

;ause of the war element in it. ued 

But Harry is a great little worker a the 

he landed it safe and sound with ' uc ~ 

First National after a resounding P'°£ y 

licity campaign. 'jjk 

So after all if a picture having a \ 

theme is made in a big way and a 

man who knows his business handlec 

there should be no reason why it sho 

not go over and make a nice P r cds 

"The Unpardonable Sin" and "Wh ^ 

the Gods Destroy" prove this. cu j t 

.ion 

An Opportunity for Accurate, 
Sincere Counsel 

THE REPORTER HAS BE 

amazed by the number of indepeiu M. 

producers who have come to him l-Mts- 

"„ advice and heh> in, r ^?°" 
lution opposing .^ F c<n -01 ihe blue 

laws." 



•ing 
the 



ap- 



3111111111111111111111 i ii inn iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii i mniiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii 

Innovation in Film Manufacture 

Eastman Kodak Company Makes Important Im- 
provement by Furnishing Footage Numbered 
Negative — Saves Time and Labor — No Extra Cost 




Positive and negative, showing the new system of 
numbering each foot. 



The Eastman Kodak Company has 
just made an important improvement in 
its perforated negative motion picture 
film. Hereafter all negative stock per- 
forated by the Company will be furn- 
ished, with- 
out extra 
cost, with 
con secutive 
edge num- 
bers, one foot 
apart, which 
will appear 
upon devel- 
o p m e n t on 
the opposite 
edge from 
the usual 
words "East- 
man Kodak," 
as, for exam- 
p 1 e, "10001," 
" 10002," " 1- 
0003." 

By a sim- 
ple change in 
the printing 
machine, 
which is ac- 
complished by cutting a slit 5/64ths of 
an inch wide on the left side of the 
aperture plate, the measuring numbers 
can be printed and made to appear on 
the edge of the finished positive. The 
figures will run from 0 to 99999 before 
being duplicated. 

The advantage of this system of con- 
secutively registering the footage of the 
negative and positive, is in its applica- 
tion to the final cutting and assembling 
of the successive scenes which portray 
or carry out the action of the story, and 
in addition will be invaluable when se- 
lecting scenes for duplicate prints or 
re-orders for making repairs. 

Simplifies Assembling. 
The method of locating the portion 
or portions of each negative scene to be 
used for final printing has been hereto- 
fore to compare the negative with such 
marks or checks as have been placed 
on the positive after decision on the 
action and footage to be used has been 
determined by projection. 

This method aside from being slow 
and tedious, particularly in the cutting 
and assembling of large productions, 
also entails frequent and often serious 
damage to the negative, due to the 
image becoming scratched or otherwise 
marred as the result of constant hand- 
ling when comparing the negative with 
the positive. It is also expensive be- 
cause specially skilled labor is required. 

Eastman edge numbered perforated 
negative motion picture film materially 
cheapens and simplifies the , cutting and 
assembling, and also does away with the 
possibility of selecting the wrong scene, 
particularly if selection has to be made 
from among several re-takes. For ex- 
ample: scene No. 15 begins with footage 
figures 26530 and runs thirty-six feet to 
26566. If re-takes are made on the 
same roll the numbers will be higher 
or possibly run into a new roll having 



entirely different numbers: as, for in- 
stance, thirty-six feet from 8216 to 8252. 

When it has been decided to use a 
particular scene and the first print has 
been made, it is then only necessary to 

rewind the 
the negative 
of that scene 
to find the 
footage num- 
bers which 
have been 
marked or 
c h e c ked on 
the positive 
of that scene 
as described 
above, and 
thus quickly 
arrive within 
the space of 
one foot of 
the point at 
which it has 
been decided 
to cut the 
action. In 
other words, 
it is simply a 
case of following the figures even though 
the action carries through several rolls 
each bearing entirely different figures. 

This notable improvement will be 
supplied without extra charge on all 
negative film perforated by the Eastman 
Kodak Company. 



star 



Hansen Supports Mix 

Juanita Hansen, who has been a 
in her own right, is to be leading woman 
for Tom Mix in the star's forthcoming 
production, which bears the temporary 
title, "The Romance of Cow Hollow." 
This picture will be made under the 
direction of Arthur Rosson, at Holly- 
wood, Cal. 




Prlscllla Dean and Snm De Grnaar In a 
scene from "A Silk Lined Burglar." 
(Universal.) 



?5 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 



Lithographs Mean Bigger Crowds 

J. B. Ritchey in Interview Explains Possibilities of Posters 
as Business Getters and Urges Exhibitors to Give More 
Attention to This Phase of Advertising Feature Productions 

□ □ 
□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□a 



Recognition of the importance of the 
motion picture industry and the solid- 
ifying of those interests upon sound 
commercial principles is had by the an- 
nouncement of the Richey Lithograph- 
ing Corporation of New York to con- 
duct an extensive trade paper campaign 
in an endeavor to establish a demand 
among exhibitors, particularly for a 
higher form of posters and lithographs. 

J. B. Ritchey, president of that com- 
pany, and one of the pioneers in the 
specialization of lithographing for the 
theatrical and motion picture industry, 
gives expression to some very pertinent 
remarks concerning the manufacture and 
use of posters in the exploitation of mo- 
tion picture attractions. 

Lithographs Are Important 

"I feel," said Mr. Ritchey, "that my 
practical experience as a motion picture 
producer, for I was such in the early 
days of the industry, gives me peculiar 
qualifications to speak on the question of 
lithographs, as far as it applies to mo- 
tion pictures. There is no doubt that 
exhibitors appreciate that a proper litho- 
graphic display on any production is 
bound to increase the attendance at his 
theatre, and that oft times a picture is 
either made or marred by the character 
of the advertising matter circulated. 

"We hear the cry for 'Posters with ac- 
tion,' and there is a substantial reason 
for this. If the lithograph is inane, in- 
sipid or dull, if there is no real punch to 
it, the public naturally receives the im- 
pression that the picture is no stronger 
than its advertising matter, and pass 
it by. 



"The American public being a virile, 
aggressive and forceable race, wants ac- 
tion in everything they see or do. They 
love the great outdoors; they love the 
struggles of youth, both the physical and 
mental; they love to see right conquer 
over might. In short their very souls 
dote on action. In the making of litho- 
graphs producers and exhibitors have 
come to learn that thought, detail and at- 
tention must be put into them in pro- 
portion to the detail and attention ex- 
pended upon the picture itself. 

"Then there is the psychological as- 
pect to it all. Color naturally attracts 
the eye, and if it is properly blended and 
chosen so as to draw optical attention 
of the passerby, it is accomplishing its 
advertising purpose. You may ask what 
has the Ritchie Lithographing Corpora- 
tion got to do with all of this. The an- 
swer is simple. It has taken us the past 
twelve months to comb the country for 
men whom we believe to be the best 
lithographing artists possible to secure. 

To Advertise Extensively 

"We have re-equipped our plant with 
the most modern machinery the world 
can deliver, and we are going to spend 
our money through the medium of ad- 
vertising in an endeavor to assist pro- 
ducers and exhibitors in the proper use 
of lithographs, and to add our technical 
knowledge to theirs so that all those in- 
terested in the industry may be edu- 
cated to that point where a billboard 
will never again show an inferior or 
weak poster. 

"Having a pardonable pride in our 
work, and our ability, we are going to 
make use of it to the end that 'Better 
posters for Better Pictures,' will become 
an accomplished fact." 



Rothapfel Selects 
Cast for Feature; 
First Scenes Shot 

The Rothapfel United Program is 
progressing at the Bacon-Becker studio, 
where Mr. Rothapfel and his staff of as- 
sistants are producing the various fac- 
tors of this unit. The comedy, conceived 
by Mr. Rothapfel and scenarioized by 
George V. Hobart, one of America's best 
known playwrights, has been completed. 
Helen Weir, who was with David War- 
field in "The Music Master;" Yvonne 
Sheldon, of Ziegfeld Follies fame; Tem- 
plar Saxe, Walter McEwen, Alex 
Herbert and Eugene Acker are seen in 
prominent roles. 

Mr. Rothapfel is giving his personal 
attention to every detail relative to pro- 
duction. The cast for the feature has 
been selected and assembled and the first 
scenes have been shot. The cast con- 
tains the names of prominent artists of 
the silent drama, their names to be an- 
nounced later. 

For the magazine reel, one of the im- 
portant factors of the Rothapfel unit, Mr. 
Rothapfel has assembled a collection of 
subjects that are original in every sense 
of the word. Interesting and timely 
short subjects make up this factor of the 
program. 



Films in Passenger 

Coaches Violate Law 

Complaints have been received by the 
Transportation Committee of the Na- 
tional Association of the Motion Pic- 
ture Industry from several of the rail- 
roads, that messengers in the employ of 
exhibitors, have been making a practice 
of carrying motion picture film into the 
coaches of passenger trains. 

This is in direct opposition to the 
rules of the railroad companies and the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, which 
state that film must be checked in the 
baggage car. 




DRAMATIC SCENES FROM "VIRTUOUS MEN" 

~ . ^^v^o rt.o*,»i Buuny equal 
is upon it made by the story. 




Stop at Pescos Valley 

;. and Mrs. Edgar Lewis are so- 
wing at Pescos Valley, near Artesia, 
V Mexico. Their stay at this point is 
1 for health and business. Pescos 
ley has one of the largest fresh water 
her wells in the world located in its 
ier. The enactment of the prohibi- 
: amendment probably has nothing 
io with Mr. Lewis picking this spot 
safety's sake, but it shows fore- 
ight. 



E. K. Lincoln untl Clara Joel hnve the leadings ru m in this S. L. picture, said to be teeming with action 

by Ralph Ince and will hooii be placed upon the market. 

26 



Legalize Sunday Shows 

ARTFORD, CONN.— The Cormecti- 
Senate has passed the Sunday: open- 
Act which will legalize Sunday ^Show- 
in that state. The House is to take 
he measure today and favorable ac- 
i.s anticipated. A bill legalizing Sun- 
openings was passed last year, but 
Vetoed hv the Govern'^ " -ij-- 
It was personally directed 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



THE CUTTING ROOM 

Editing the Excess Footage in the News and Publicity of the Week 
Down to a Few Reels That Tell the Story Quickly — and With a Punch 

By THE * REPORTER 

Ifr^iiraifryTi^iTT^iT^ 



More Stars for 
United Artists 

IT IS REPORTED THAT THE 
United Artists are to invite the partici- 
pation of more stars in their associa- 
tion. 

To the "Reporter" this looks like a very 
short sighted policy from the standpoint 
of the stars themselves. 
Everyone in a position to judge will 
admit that the people who compose the 
Association now are the real stars. 
That is, they are the people for whom 
the exhibitor will pay the price and 
whom the public scrambles to see. 
They have a prestige — a reputation 
which will undoubtedly be enhanced by 
association with one another. Now then, 
if they bring other artists into the com- 
bine, even if they are good, but not top- 
notchers, the collective prestige or 
reputation must suffer and I believe that 
prices will suffer too. 
In other words, the old adage of the 
chain being no stronger than its weakest 
link will apply. 

Indulging in Personalities 
for a Moment 

ALTHOUGH IT IS NOT THE PUR- 
pose of the "Reporter" to indulge in 
personalities, an exception can no doubt 
be made in this case. Harry Reichen- 
bach deserves considerable credit for his 
handling of the Macauley picture 
"Whom the Gods Destroy." Many peo- 
ple consider this picture a flivver be- 
cause of the war element in it. 
But Harry is a great little worker and 
he landed it safe and sound with the 
First National after a resounding pub- 
licity campaign. 

So after all if a picture having a war 
theme is made in a big way and a big 
man who knows his business handled it 
there should be no reason why it should 
not go over and make a nice profit. 
"The Unpardonable Sin" and "Whom 
the Gods Destroy" prove this. 

An Opportunity for Accurate, 
Sincere Counsel 

THE REPORTER HAS BEEN 
amazed by the number of independent 
producers who have come to him lately 
and asked for advice and help in dis- 
tribution matters. 



Well versed in production, these men 
seem to be babes in the wood as far as 
disposing of the picture after it is made. 
It occurred to the "Reporter" that there 
was a wonderful opportunity for a man 
of brains, ability and experience and one 
absolutely square to work up a splendid 
business for himself and render invalu- 
able service to others by giving expert 
counsel, help and advice to independents 
starting out and others already in trou- 
ble. 

But the man must have a reputation to 
start with, that will gain the entire con- 
fidence of his prospective clients. And, 
I may say, the above is fairly tall order 
for a good many in the film business 
today. 

House Cleaning Coming 
at Exhibitors Mutual 

I AM TOLD THAT A HOUSE 
cleaning is due at the Exhibitors Mu- 
tual. Not officials this time, but stars. 
It seems that the "Exhibitors" have too 
much material that is not getting by. 
Several stars, it is said, are not getting 
the results. So they are going to be 
eliminated. 

This is interesting and significant, be- 
cause it only proves the statement made 
in these columns repeatedly that the ex- 
hibitors and public want big stuff and 
that the mediocre material will not get 
by. 

A mediocre story or star is absolutely 
useless today, with the glutting of prod- 
uct on the market. For an example, 
when the "Reporter" was in Indianapolis 
a short while ago, there were over 200 
pictures waiting for first run and only 
three or four houses available. And 
most of this stuff was of the program 
variety. 

Tichenor Leaves — General Once 
Again at Death's Door 

HOW DO THEY DO IT? PRO- 
ducers come and go, but distributors 
seem to hang right on. Take the old 
General for instance, it has been always 
going but the "wee drap o' whuskey" 
seems to have always been on hand at 
the critical time to revive the patient. 
But today the General is apparently hard 
hit. Gradual diminution of product, etc., 
seems to have finally had effect and the 



news that Frank Tichenor has left is 
not reassuring to the man in the street. 
I personally believe that the General 
never did fully recover from the an- 
tipathy it created in the trade in the 
old days. Will the General do the same 
acrobatic flop that the Mutual did a 
while ago and hang on? It would seem 
doubtful. 

Universal Proves 
it Too 

THE UNIVERSAL IN THE DIS- 
tinuance of the Bluebird brand adds con- 
crete force and proof to the above. Open 
market, increasing number of big houses, 
development of the first run market, 
all demand big pictures and the elim- 
ination of the deadly commonplace. 

Cochrane's Caustic 
Comments Bite Deep 

THE REPORTER HAS BEEN READ- 
ing with great interest the series of ads 
appearing in one of the trade journals 
under the signature of Carl Laemmle of 
the Universal. Of course it is an open 
secret that Mr. Laemmle leaves this to 
Mr. Cochrane. 

And I think every exhibitor should read 
this material carefully, because while it 
is ad stuff, it also contains truths that 
are salient and well worth realizing. 
"R. H." has a caustic pen and it bites 
deep, but at that it strikes home and 
Bob's straight-from-the-shoulder talks 
are "there." 

I don't see why he confines his writing 
to ads when he could turn his expe- 
rience to the aid of so many exhibitors. 
There are a lot of big men who could 
help this way if they wished. 

More Production in 
the East 

THE HARD WINTER A YEAR AGO 
rushed every one to California this win- 
ter for production and now the available 
news would indicate that the East is 
going to claim its share again. Lasky is 
going to build on Long Island — Peerless 
will resume at Fort Lee — signs which 
indicate considerable activity back 'ome 
for the coming season. From every 
angle 1919-20 looms mighty big on the 
moving picture horizon. 



27 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



APPROVES HERALD' EDITORIAL 

CONDEMNING NICKEL SHOWS 

To Exhibitors Herald and Motography, 
Chicago, 111. 

Your article on the "Nickel Show," appearing in your issue of March 22nd, is very 
appropriate. Ninety-eight per cent of the exhibitors are with you strong on this matter, 
while a mere handful of the "5 centers" seem to be powerful enough to disgrace the 
whole industry. 

If you really want to accomplish something worth while for the business, please take 
this matter up with the N. A. M. P. I. and keep after it as they can rid the industry of 
these obnoxious pests at one stroke. 

Congratulating you again, I am, Very truly yours, 

(Signed) L. L. BARD, 

College Theatre, Los Angeles, Cal 



Wouldn't Work For $1 



William Fox Features for April 

Include First With Ray and Fair 



Variety marks the William Fox fea- 
tures scheduled for publication in April. 
Comedy, drama and Western romance 
will be found in the five pictures which 
will be sent out to exhibitors under the 
Fox banner. There will be one William 
Fox Standard picture, two Victory pic- 
tures and two Excel pictures. 

The Standard picture to be published 
is "Wolves of the Night," featuring Wil- 
liam Farnum. Mr. Farnum only recently 
completed this picture, which is de- 
scribed as a story of the northwest 
copper country and the fight of a mine 
owner to save his property and his wife 
from unscrupulous financiers. The pic- 
ture is based on a story by E. Lloyd 
Sheldon, and was directed by J. Gordon 
Edwards. who staged "Cleopatra," 
"Salome" and other Fox successes. The 
feminine lead is played by Louise 
Lovely, and others in the cast are: G. 
Raymond Nye, Charles Clary, Al Fre- 
mont and Lamar Johnston, all well 
known film players. 

The two Victory pictures set for pub- 
lication are "Pitfalls of a Big City," fea- 
turing Gladys Brockwell, and "Help! 
Help! Police!" starring George Walsh. 
"Pitfalls of a Big City" is described as 
a stirring story of the underworld. The 
story was written by Bennet R. Cohen, 
and in the cast are: William Scott, Wil- 
liam Sheer, Al Fremont, Ashton Dear- 
holt and Helen Wright. The scenes for 
"Help! Help! Police!" were taken at 
Palm Beach, which is the locale of the 
story. The story was written by Irving 
McDonald. The picture was directed by 
Edward Dillon, who staged the last two 
George Walsh subjects. "Luck and 
Pluck" and "Never Say Quit." 

The first picture made by Albert Rav 
and Elinor Fair for William Fox will 
be published next month. This is "Mar- 
ried in Haste." The storv is of a whole- 
some nature, suitable to the personalities 
of Mr. Ray and Miss Fair. 

Mr. Ray's work stamps him as a star 
of talent in comedy roles, and he is ably 
supported by Miss Fair. The picture was 
directed by Arthur Rosson, this mark- 
ing Mr. Rosson's debut as a Fox direc- 
tor. 

"The Love that Dares," starring Mad- 
laine Traverse, is the other Fox Excel 
picture to be published next month. This 
is Miss Traverse's third picture as a 
William Fox star, the others being "The 
Danger Zone" and "Gambling in Souls." 



Her great success in "The Caillaux 
Case" placed her in stardom. "The Love 
That Dares" was directed by Harry Mil- 
larde. The story is by Elmer Harris, 
and the scenario is the work of Denni- 
son Clift. 



Theatre Man Opposes 

New Orleans Ordinance 

NEW ORLEANS, LA.— "There is no 
more danger around a film exchange than 
there is around a drug store or a dry goods 
store where celluloid goods are kept." 

This statement was made in a letter to 
Commissioner Stone from J. L. Williams, 
manager of the Crescent City Film Ex- 
change. The letter protests against the 
ordinance Mr. Stone plans to introduce 
which will, if passed, require motion pic- 
ture exchanges to provide concrete vaults 
for the storage of films, to guard against 
explosions, and to install sprinkler sys- 
tems. 

Mr. Williams maintains the passage of 
the ordinance would work a great hard- 
ship on the small film exchanges. 



"The Iron Test" Sets 

New Vitagraph Record 

Last week Vitagraph announced that 
the Antonio Moreno-Carol Holloway 
serial "The Iron Test," as evidenced by 
the figures of the New York branch of- 
fice, would take rank as the most suc- 
cessful of the entire line of Vitagraph 
serials. 

The home office states that the figures 
of three other branch offices gone over 
this week more than substantiates the 
success indicated by the figures of the 
New York territory. 



Buys Many Machines 

The Southern Theatre Equipment of 
Atlanta, Ga., who equipped the Strand 
Theatre, Knoxville, Tenn., with two 
Powers' 6-B Cameragraphs for the Sig- 
nal Amusement Company of Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn., report that they have sold 
this concern fourteen 6-B Cameragraphs 
within the last year. 

28 




Gladys Leslie, star of Vitagraph's "Miss 
Dulcie from Dixie" recently found south- 
ern talent had gone up. "You all make 
'bout a hundred dollars on ma pitcher, an' 
you only pay me a dollar? No sah, I don't 
pose for any such compensation," said the 
little cotton picker. 



Hart-W. H. Productions 

Hearings Are Resumed 

NEW YORK.— Hearing of the suit of 

William H. Hart against the W. H. Pro- 
ductions was resumed by Examiner John 
R. Dowlan of the Federal Trade Com- 
mission yesterday and final decision is 
expected within a short time. ■ 

Hart complains of "unfair competi- 
tion," pointing out that W. H. Produc- 
tions has assumed his initials, and is re- 
issuing old Hart pictures under new 
names. 



Thanhouser to Quit 

NEW YORK.— The Thanhouser com- 
pany, one of the first companies in the 
old Mutual and which made a fortune for 
its stockholders, will sell its assets April 
3 and go out of business. The assets 
include studios at New Rochelle* and 
Jacksonville, Fla., and negatives for 60 
five-reelers, 200 two-reelers, and 100 
single-reels. Dr. W. E., J. F. and Wil- 
bert Shallenberger and Crawford Liv- 
ingston are the big stockholders. 



Favors Sunday Films 

ALBANY, N. Y. — Assemblyman Slacer 
of Buffalo has introduced a bill permit- 
ting the showing of motion pictures for 
educational and recreational purposes on 
Sundays between 2 and 6 p. m., in armo- 
ries, schoolhouses and state, county and 
municipal buildings. 



Rosenberg on Trip 

Mike Rosenberg of Seattle, Wash., is 
contemplating a trip to Manhattan about 
April 1. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Martin Johnson Again on His Way 

To Film Savages of South Seas 

Intrepid Photographer and His Wife Address 
Chicago Theatre Crowds — to Be Gone 
Three Years 



Martin Johnson, world renowned 
traveler, explorer and intrepid motion 
picture expert, accompanied by Mrs. 
Johnson, arrived in Chicago on Tuesday 
and during their few hours stay made 
"personal appearances" at the Randolph 
Theatre, where Martin Johnson's film 
"Cannibals of the South Seas" is the 
attraction this week. 

Mr. Johnson related in detail, many 
of the thrilling experiences he went 
through to get the film that the patrons 
of the Randolph are enjoying this week. 
Mrs. Johnson, too, spoke of the num- 
erous too-near-death-to-be-comfortable 
adventures she had in these savage in- 
habited islands. 

The Johnsons have just started on 
another voyage to the South Seas where 
they will visit islands that have as yet 
never been explored by white people, 
and incidentally push far back into the 
bush country of several islands they 
visited on their first trip to the South 
Seas. These bushmen are cannibals, 
head hunters and the like and the op- 
portunity to study them at close range 
and with the valuable assistance of a 
motion picture camera seems almost too 
good to let pass, according to the John- 
son estimate of what is good and other- 
wise. 

On Three-Year Trip 

The present voyage of the Martin 
Johnsons will, it is expected, last more 
than three years. They will carry a 
complete equipment for developing and 
printing their film as rapidly as it is 
"shot," and the finished negative will be 
sent back to Sydney, Australia, by trad- 
ers and thence expressed to the New 
York offices of Robertson-Cole company 
who have general charge of the Martin- 
Johnson pictures, releasing the product 
through the Exhibitors' Mutual ex- 
changes. 

Not the least bit adventuresome part 
of the Johnsons' journey will be their 
visit to old Chief Nagapate, the most 
noted as well as the crudest of South 
Sea Island chieftains. When the John- 
sons previously visited the country of 
the Big Numbers, over which Nagapate 
rules they were virtually made captives' 
their motion picture cameras, three in 
number, were confiscated although by 
sheer good luck they later had one re- 
stored to them, while their very lives 
were threatened as Nagapate smacked 
his hideously painted lips while he con- 
templated the delicious delicacy the white 
fair flesh of Mrs. Johnson would provide 
for a dinner. But for the timely arrival 
of a British man-of-war in the nearby 
harbor there would not be any Martin 
Johnsons alive today. 



Mr. Johnson, in discussing his equip- 
ment said: 

"All of our motion picture cameras 
have been made to order, with special 
apparatus for tropical photography. 
They are made of special metals to resist 
the humid atmosphere, and have special 
dissolves and improvements that will 
enable me to 'shoot' in all sorts of 
atmospheric and other conditions. Then, 
too, I shall have special lenses for micro- 
scopic work, so that I shall be able to get 
a celluloid record of small insects and 
flora. I shall have, too, long distance 
lenses for photographing long shots 
while a special apparatus will enable 
me to get the pictures of animal life 
under the seas around the coral reefs. 
For my 'stills,' I shall carry five dif- 
ferent kinds of cameras, so that I shall 
be able to work in all sorts of conditions. 
I shall also carry a complete developing 
and printing apparatus which has been 
made for my special purposes and which 
will enable me to develop and print my 
film immediately. I shall entrust it to 
traders for delivery at Sydney, Australia, 
whence it will be shipped to the New 
York offices of the Robertson-Cole com- 
pany. 

"One of the novel features of my 
equipment will be a projection machine 
and screen by the use of which I shall 
be able to project our pictures when- 
ever we may care to do so. I shall also 
take with me a number of films, largely 
travel and 'trick' pictures which we 
shall project to the amazed and de- 
lighted eyes of the savages. I have often 
seen, in my imagination, the wonderful 
experiences we shall have with an 
audience of some thousand of black men, 
squatted before our screen, and watch 



them as we project on the screen their 
own selves, walking about their own 
huts and clearances, performing their 
native dances and going through their 
religious ceremonials. Even I, who am 
rather well acquainted with the savage 
peoples of the islands, cannot realize 
how they will receive these pictorial 
reproductions of their own actions. 

Gewgaws for Natives 

"Aside from our photographic equip- 
ment I shall take many boxes of magi- 
cians' tricks, jumping jacks and other 
toys as well as crates of tobacco sticks, 
knives, hatchets, bolts of gaudy hued 
calico, beads, old hats, fancy dress cos- 
tumes and other things of a similarly 
spectacular appearance for the black men 
like color above all else. Of course 
we shall have an uncommonly complete 
equipment of rifles, revolvers and all 
manner of fishing tackle, from the small- 
est hook and line to the large harpoons 
and granes. 

"While I have received scores of re- 
quests from all sorts of people for a 
chance to accompany our expedition, I 
have been compelled to refuse all such 
applications because experience has 
taught me that it is infinitely better to 
rely upon the native mission boy police 
and such other help that we may be able 
to get in the Islands than to take our 
assistants from our home country. 

"Only Mrs. Johnson and myself will 
represent the United States on our 
journeyings, so we are rather confident 
of our American 'crew,' because we both 
have had experience in the sort of life 
that we shall be compelled to live for 
three years, each is determined to make 
the trip a great big success and Mrs. 
Johnson says that she'll go where I go 
and that goes double, so far as I'm 
concerned." 



Lesser Going to N. Y. 

Sol L. Lesser is expected in New York 
on or about April 10. This will be Mr. 
Lesser's first trip to the metropolis in 
about a year. 




29 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOT O GRAPH Y 



ANOTHER B. B. PRODUCTION 



^■mmiiiiiiiitii iiiii iitiHiiniiiiiiiititiii 




In -Heart's Asleep" Bessie Barriseale rises from a lowly scrub Brirl to a position in 
society. It is an Kxhibitors Mutual feature. 



New Orleans Board 
Wants Mexican Hero 
In Occasional Film 

Objects to Mexican Being 
Villian Continually in 
Reel Life 

NEW ORLEANS, LA.— Acting on 
the request made of Mayor Behrman 
by R. E. Muzquiz, local consul general 
of Mexico, to aid in preventing the ex- 
hibiting of motion pictures depicting 
Mexican villains without showing Mexi- 
cans of better nature and character, the 
board of directors of the Association 
of Commerce have adopted resolutions 
protesting against the exhibiting of this 
type of film. 

Copies of the resolutions, which read 
as follows, were sent to Mayor Behr- 
man, Consul General Muzquiz and the 
various motion picture producers: 
The Resolutions 

"It it the sense of the board of direc- 
tors of the New Orleans Association of 
Commerce that the constant exploitation 
of Mexican bandit life and other un- * 
favorable phases of Mexico by the mov- 
ing picture concerns in the United States, 
in the absence of the exploitation by 
these moving picture concerns of the 
favorable side of Mexican life is 
detrimental and contrary to the best 
interests of the two countries, and calcu- 
lated to cause misunderstanding and 
unfavorable opinion whereas the best 
interests of both countries require the 
best possible understanding, each of the 
other, and the best appreciation of the 
better side of each country by the other. 

"Therefore, be it resolved, that the 
New Orleans Association of Commerce 
call the attention of the moving picture 
production companies to this matter 
and- urge them to encourage the exploita- 
tion of the favorable rather than the un- 
favorable side of Mexican life." 



Foreign Outlook Bright, 

Says Chester Beecroft 

Chester Beecroft, film exporter, who 
is now in Paris, France, having just fin- 
ished an extended business trip through- 
out the allied and neutral countries of 
Europe, expects to return to America on 
the "Aquatania" on its next trip. 

Mr. Beecroft writes that the foreign 
market is in a wonderfully receptive con- 
dition for American film productions. 
He has established headquarters in Nor- 
way, Sweden, Denmark. France and 
England. Prior to this trip he had al- 
ready established headquarters in Madrid, 
Spain, and Melbourne, Australia. 

Mr. Beecroft's business has grown to 
such proportions that he has found it 
necessary to appoint eleven foreign rep- 
resentatives to handle the vast volume 
of American films which pass through 
his hands. He states that one of the 
chief drawbacks at the present time in 
the foreign market is the extreme and 
seemingly unnecessary delay in getting 
cable messages through in time to con- 
summate a deal, but adds that when the 
oress matter on the Peace Conference 
is over cable conditions will undoubt- 
edly improve greatly. The mail service 
between the United States and the for- 
eign market has greatly improved. 



Buys Special Feature 

It has just been learned that the First 
National will distribute the feature, 
"Whom the Gods Would Destroy," and 
which was produced by the Macauley 
Pictures Corporation. The feature has 
been indorsed bv ninny societies throughout 
the country. It is reported that Harry 
Reichenbach is sending out some ten 
thousand letters per week from the Ma- 
cauley office as a novelty advertising 
scheme for the production. 



INQUIRY FROM ORIENT 

Doll-Van Film Corporation 

"Successful Pictures Only" 
2o7 S. Wabash Ave. 
Chicago. 
Feb. 26th, I9I9. 
EXHIBITORS HERALD 
AND MOTOGRAPHY, 

Chicago, III. 
Gentlemen : 

It makes the world seem like a 
smaller place to receive a letter 
like the one that came in yester- 
day afternoon; either that or it 
makes the "Exhibitors Herald 
and M otography" seem a bigger 
paper. 

We enclose a copy of the let- 
ter, which you may be interested 
in reading. 

Yours very truly, 
DOLL-VAN FILM CORP., 
(Signed) D. W. Vandawalker, 
General Manager. 
(Copy) 

FILMS THAT FILL THE 
HOUSE 
LEO ELLEGARD 

FILM AGENCY 
IMPORTERS OF FILM 
From Every Corner of the Globe 
Offices : I9 Doubreh St. 
Cairo, 22 January I9I9 
DOLL-VAN FILM CORP. 
Film Agents 
CHICAGO, ILL. 
Gentlemen: 

Thru the EXHIBITORS ! 
HERALD AND MOTOGRA- j 
PHY we learn that you have re- 
leased in your Territory a ONE 
REEL NOVELTY entitled: 
"HOW STARS TWINKLE I 
AWAY FROM THE 
STUDIO" 
and as we sliall be pleased to pur- 
chase this feature for our Coun- 
try, your lozvest price with syn- 
opsis, will greatly oblige. 

We enclose you an advertise- 
ment which appeared in a lead- 
ing Trade Review in London 
with regard to a film featuring \ 
Charlie Chaplin, etc. 

Could you supply us zvith I 
same? 

Awaiting the pleasure to hear j 
from you by return mail, we are, j 
Gentlemen, 

Faithfully yours, 

(Signed) Leo Ellegard. 
P. S. We expect to receive your \ 
quotation with regard to the \ 
Film "HOW STARS TWIN- \ 
RLE AWAY FROM THE I 
STUDIO" by CABLE. We will j 
immediately open you a cable f 
credit. L. E. 



IIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIII'INimilllllllMfl Mililllllllimilllllfi 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



"The Carter Case"Smashes Records 
For Bookings Throughout Chicago 

Lubliner and Trinz and Ascher Brothers Head 
Long List of Exhibitors Who Will Show Serial 



Booked solidly through the Lubliner 
and Trinz and the Ascher Brothers cir- 
cuits in addition to many of the finest 
independent houses, "The Carter Case," 
the Craig Kennedy serial being dis- 
tributed by the Celebrated Players com- 
pany for the Oliver Films, Inc., promises 
to break all records for serials in Chi- 
cago and the immediate vicinity. 

The success being attained locally is 
parallel to that in the east, where distri- 
buting companies have been swamped 
with orders for the serial from exhibitors. 
Policy Changed for Picture 

J. L. Friedman, general manager of 
Celebrated Players, in placing the con- 
tract for the series with the Lubliner and 
Trinz, obtained the highest price ever 
paid for a serial in this city. Lubliner 
and Trinz immediately announced that 
the serial would be shown at evening 
performances as well as matinees — a dis- 
tinct departure from policy. 

Mr. Friedman states that bookings are 
being completed throughout the city and 
that announcements of a long list of 
contracts will be made within a few days. 

Oliver Films, Inc., believes that "The 
Carter Case" reaches the pinnacle of 
picture serial achievement. When ex- 
hibitors start "The Carter Case" they 
are expected to reap the benefit of the 
exploitation campaign on this serial, and 
the interest already aroused throughout 
the country, not to speak of the wide 
popularity of Craig Kennedy, is con- 
sidered sufficient to crowd their theatres 
every day "The Carter Case" is shown. 

Has Two Popular Stars 

The names of Herbert Rawlinson and 
Margaret Marsh, as co-stars, are in 
themselves a drawing card, but Oliver 
Films, Inc. has not been satisfied to de- 
pend upon the popularity of their stars; 
they have given the serial a special pro- 
duction and have the added benefit of 
showing on the. screen one of the Craig 
Kennedy stories. 

The advertising campaign for "the Car- 



ter Case" has been of an unusual character 
and illustrates a departure from the gen- 
eral form of picture advertising. There 
is no doubt that it has borne results and 
that the ready-made audiences are await- 
ing the exhibitor when he releases the 
first episode, as was the case at the 
Symphony Theatre, in New York. 

The cast of "The Carter Case," in ad- 
dition to Herbert Ra,wlinson and Mar- 
garet Marsh, includes Ethel Gray Terry, 
Coit Albertson, Kempton Greene, Joseph 
Marba, William Pike, Donald Hall, Gene 
Baker, Louis R. Wolheim, D. W. McRey- 
nolds, Leslie Stowe. Franklyn Hanna, 
Frank Wonderlee and John Reinhard. 



Fairbanks Completes 
Propaganda Film for 
Fifth 'Victory' Loan 
"Knocking Knockers" Will 
Be Used by U. S. to 
Boost Bonds 

Douglas Fairbanks has completed his 
propaganda film "Knocking Knockers," 
specially produced at the request of Sec- 
retary Tumulty and Frank R. Wilson, 
Director of Publicity, Treasury Depart- 
ment, to be used in the advance cam- 
paign for the Fifth Victory Loan. 

The Fairbanks Victory Loan film is 
now en route to the Treasury 'Depart- 
ment, national capital, where it will be 
shown to Secretary of the Treasury 
Glass and members of his department in 
charge of exploitation work connected 
with the next government bond drive. 
A schedule of distribution is now being 
perfected by Director of Publicity Frank 
R. Wilson. 

The various parts in this allegorical 
picture are played by Frank Campeau, 
Sara Mason, Charles Stevens, Spike 
Robinson, Bull Montana and W. \. 
Wellmari, the American ace, under the 
stage direction of Ted Reed. 



"Doug" and "Hi" 

Fairbanks and Hiram Abrams, 
Recently Engaged General 
Manager of United Artists 
Corporation 




Willat Sues Committee 

Carl A. Willat has brought suit in the 
supreme court against Jacob S. Popper, 
of the Metropolitan Canvas Committee 
of the Liberty Loan campaign, to re- 
cover $4,710. The complaint states that 
the members of the committee author- 
ized Popper to employ someone to pre- 
pare a motion picture scenario and fur- 
nish a production for the Liberty Loan 
drive. Mr. Popper made a contract with 
Willat to do the work. Willat says he 
had a picture and scenario ready for 
delivery before September 1, which was 
approved by the committee and a pay- 
ment of $3,500 was authorized. He says 
he spent $2,210 in connection with the 
production, making a total of $5,710. and 
he has only received $1,000 on account. 



FORTHCOMING AMERICAN PLAYS OF WIDE RANGE 




I,eft — Mary Mile* Mint.-r in n s.-.m- from "Vvomu- from Paris." Center — William ltus-.ll tli<- cop In «BrUi IIiiUohm" 

■eene from "Pul I i> Your Hands." in vrhlen Warg-arlta Pinner In ■ tarred, i American Film Company.) 



II ill in — v 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND M O T O G R A P H Y 



San Francisco and 
Bakersfield Angle 
For Picture Studio 

Lasky Considering 'Frisco; 
Warwick's Company 
Seeks Location 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— San Fran- 
cisco's first motion picture studio will be 
established within two months if the 
present plans of Jesse L. Lasky, presi- 
dent of the Famous Players-Lasky Cor- 
poration, who left here a few days ago 
for Los Angeles en route to New York, 
do not miscarry. 

Lasky has been in the city two days 
going over the situation, and he returns 
to place before the directors of his cor- 
poration in the East much data favor- 
able to the building of a studio in San 
Francisco. 

At the Fairmont Hotel before his de- 
parture, Lasky said: 

"Although nothing can be decided un- 
til after I reach New York, I can say 
that the chances of opening a studio here 
are very good. Heretofore pictures 
were taken by natural light, but artificial 
light is used almost exclusively now, so 
the fogs would not hinder our work. 
The advantages offered here are greater 
than in Los Angeles. For one thing we 
could get better street scenes. Moreover, 
there is an entirely new field in San 
Francisco for better dressed "extra" 
characters, for no one can deny that the 
girls here know how to dress. The scen- 
ery around the water front and docks 
and across the bay and down the penin- 
sula is also what we need." 

Lasky will return to San Francisco 
early in April to put through the deal if 
his directors agree to the plans. 

Studio for Bakersfield 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL.— The Losanco 
Super-plays Incorporate Company is 
angling with the Commercial Club here, 
with a view of locating its studios in 
Bakersfield. George E. Price is presi- 
dent; Robert Warwick, general manager; 
F. C. Adams, vice president, and S. M. 
Sweet, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Warwick informed the Commer- 
cial Club that the company has a con- 
tract to supply the General Film Com- 
pany with twenty-six motion pictures 
during the next two years, and has also 
contracted for ten super-plays of from 
five to seven reels each. 



Hearl with A. E. F. 

J. A. Hearl, former advertising and 
publicity man for Herbert Brenon and 
the Ford Productions at the time he was 
drafted into the ranks of the U. S. A., 
is now with the 229th Company, Q. M. 
C, American Expeditionary Forces in 
France. Mr. Hearl writes that he ex- 
pects to be on his way home within the 
next six weeks or two months. 



Joe Brandt Goes East 

Joe Brandt, assistant treasurer and 
manager in charge of sales of Universal 
Film Manufacturing Company, passed 
through Chicago on Friday en route to 
New York. 



NOTED ILLUSTRATOR 
MAKES DRAWINGS FOR 
SAWYER AND LUBIN 

R. G. Morgan, the noted artist, has 
been engaged by Arthur H. Sawyer and 
Herbert Lubin to create four original 
drawings to be used as illustrations to 
exploit the S-L picture "Virtuous Men," 
starring E. K. Lincoln. 

Special sittings have been made for Mr. 
Morgan by Mr. Lincoln, Grace Darling, 
Clara Joel, R. W. Cummings and Wil- 
liam B. Mack. Mr. Morgan also "did a 
special crayon portrait of E. K. Lincoln 
in a character study. 

The drawings will be used as the domi- 
nant theme of the Viext insert to be pub- 
lished by Messrs. Sawyer and Lubin in 
their advertising campaign for "Virtuous 
Men." 



Publish "Marie, Ltd." 

"Marie, Ltd." Alice Brady's Select Pic- 
ture for March, will be published this 
week, and prints are now being dis- 
tributed to first run theatres by the vari- 
ous Select Exchanges. "Marie, Ltd." 
is from a story by Louise Winters, which 
appeared recently in one of the popular 
magazines, and the scenario is by Jane 
Murfin, who has collaborated with Jane 
Cowl in a number of successful stage 
plays. Kenneth Webb directed. 



Hutchinson Returns 

S. S. Hutchinson, president of the 
American Film Company, Inc., sailed 
from Liverpool March 8, on the "Car- 
mania" and arrived in Chicago this week. 
He has been away since shortly before 
Christmas, touring France and England 
in the interests of "Flying A" films. 

MAURICE TOURNEUR 



Fox Missionaries in 
Mexico to Pave Way 
For American Films 

Following closely the departure of Wil- 
liam Fox, Winfield R. Sheehan and 
Abraham Carlos for Europe, where they 
will establish producing centers and en- 
large the Fox distribution system, the 
Fox Film Corporation this week gave 
another indication of the tremendous 
growth of that organization, when it an- 
nounced that E. J. Neubeler and M. T. 
Colon have been sent to Mexico City 
for the purpose of extending the Fox 
distributing organization throughout 
Mexico. The mission of Messrs. Neube- 
ler and Colon, it is understood, followed 
the receipt of information that condi- 
tions in the republic to the south have 
become more settled, and that the people 
are demanding more high-grade motion 
pictures. 

Messrs. Neubeler and Colon will make 
their headquarters in Mexico City. There 
they will open a Fox branch office and 
then make a tour of the principal cities, 
setting up other branch offices or pro- 
viding for agencies for the distribution 
of Fox films. 

For the last few years the unsettled 
state of Mexico affairs has been a seri- 
ous obstacle to the shipping of American 
films to that country. Last summer, 
however, under the direction of the divi- 
sion of films of the Committee on Public 
Information, a number of American pic- 
tures were taken into Mexico by Abra- 
ham Carlos, general representative of 
the Fox Film Corporation. A large pro- 
portion of the consignment were Fox 
Film; and so great was the enthusiasm 
shown by the Mexicans over these pic- 
tures that it was apparent the time had 
arrived for big development of Mexico 
as a field for American motion pictures. 

IN THE SPOTLIGHT 




32 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



BEGINNING IN NEXT ISSUE 

To Hell With 

Yesterday 

By Roy L. McCardell 

In next issue the HERALD 
will commence a series of 
forcible and direct articles by 
Mr. McCardell who lias grown 
up witb the film business, 
who is equipped with the real 
facts of the industry — and 
with the ability to tell them. 



SEE NEXT ISSUE FOR FIRST ARTICLE 



! 



33 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



1 " Illl 



DIGEST OF PICTURES OF THE WEEK 



SUCH as has been written and said regarding the 
great assistance rendered by the 'screen and the 
motion picture industry in general during the 
Liberty Loan campaigns to date, probably not even the 
freest imagination has attached to that assistance its 
just importance. Certainly no other medium was as 
well qualified to keep the subject ever before the public, 
eye. No other medium can possibly lie said to have 
reached so great a number of people. 

That the government is grateful there can be no 
doubt. Such appreciation has been voiced by George 
Creel and other men in similar positions in unmistakable 
sincerity. 

And now another loan is at hand. It presents a 
greater problem than any that have gone before. It 
places a greater tax upon those concerned in its floating. 
Exhibitors, actors, every branch of the business has an- 
other big chance to help. 

Could there be asked a better opportunity to prove 
for all time the farreaching power of the screen ? 

"THE POPPY GIEL'S HUSBAND" (Artcraft) 
presents William S. Hart in a role which has nothing 
to do with cowboys, bandits, sky pilots or damsels in 
distress. It is a play of San Francisco crookdom carry- 
ing a story that possessed great possibilities but was 
slighted somewhat by faint-hearted direction. A good 
picture, however, and a welcome change for the star. 

"HIT OR MISS" (World) resembles closely a 
•'comedy with music" of the type more or less popular 
on the speaking stage. Carlyle Blackwell and Evelyn 
Greeley are the featured players and do rather well with 
the trifling material in hand. 

"THE SILVER GIRL" (Pathe) depends largely 
upon the personality and unquestioned ability of Frank 
Keenan, the star, for its dramatic value. The story is a 
familiar one, but the work of the star is sufficient to 
make its viewing thoroughly worth while. 

"THE SCARLET SHADOW' (Universal) classi- 
fies as very heavy drama or very light comedy, accord- 
ing to the whim of the audience. It is no epoch-making 
achievement in either case, but followers of Mae Murray 
will probably deem it sufficient as a vehicle. 

-THE WAY OF THE STRONG" (Metro) fol- 
lows familiar lines during the early incidents laid in the 
Yukon country, but achieves individuality in the latter, 
when the locale shifts to New York. In both cases the 
play is very well done and is excellently carried by 
Anna Q. Nillson and Joe King. 

"THOU SHALT NOT" (Fox) is the story of a 
small town girl who rebels against the narrow despotism 
of the neighborhood. Evelyn Nesbit is the star, but 
the burden of the play is borne by a set of small town 
types which could not have been better chosen. It, lias 
been done before, frequently, but never better. 



"THE TURN IN THE ROAD" (Exhibitors Mu- 
tual) is a religious play asking and answering the ques- 
tion "What Is God?" As is readily apparent, its recep- 
tion will depend largely upon the class of audience to 
which it is shown. Helen Jerome Eddy heads a cast 
containing George Nichols, Lloyd Hughes and Ben 
Alexander. 

"BRASS BUTTONS" (American) contains 
enough good things to more than make up what is lack- 
ing in plausibility and logic. William Russell is his 
usual self in a picture of the usual style. It is well 
constructed and pleasantly engaging. Russell fans 
should like it. 

"TOTON" (Triangle) affords difficult problems for 
Olive Thomas, the star, yet problems which she solves 
admirably. It is given an extra reel to accommodate a 
rather bulky story and extraordinary technical attributes 
to enhance the same. Using the war but sparingly as 
a plot factor, it should please generally. 

"EXPERIMENTAL MARRIAGE" (Select) lives 
up to the expectations born of Constance Talmadge's 
past performances. It is another farce in which she 
scores another success. There can be no question of its 
desirability as an attraction. 

"HER CODE OF HONOR" (United) was not a 
very pretty story to begin with. Consequently the skill- 
ful but dragging presentation given it succeeds in mak- 
ing it only optically beautiful. Florence Reed has a 
role well suited to her type, but the play lacks a worth- 
while point, which might have redeemed it. 

"FIGHTING DESTINY" (Vitagraph) sets forth 
as fine an example of straight-away drama as has re- 
cently been filmed. Harry Morey plays the leading role 
and has never done anything better. It has all the 
qualities which go to make up first-class photoplays. 

"THE LIGHT OF VICTORY" (Universal) is 
chiefly at fault in the tardiness of its publication. Mon- 
roe Salisbury's work is high grade as usual. That is the 
supporting cast is less notable, but passes. Great ex- 
pense was involved in its making. It is to be regretted 
that it did not see the light of the screen at an earlier 
date. 

"THE REBELLIOUS BRIDE" (Fox), a story of 
the Ozarks, is a better choice for Peggy Hyland, the star, 
than she has lately enjoyed. Excellent characterizations 
are contributed by George Hernandez, George Nichols 
and Charles LeMoyne. Pell Trenton makes a satisfac- 
tory hero. 

"FORBIDDEN FIRES" (J. Parker Reed Prod.) 
presents Louise Glaum in a play calculated to bring out 
the best of her talent. It is a wonderfully constructed 
photoplay, impressive and convincing. The story is 
adult in appeal, but the appeal is one of great scope. A 
splendid production in every way. 



REVIEWS 



ma 



William S. Hart in 

THE POPPY GIRL S HUSBAND 

Five Part Drama; Artcraft. 
Directed by Lambert Hillyer. 
Published March 16. 

OPINION : It is scarcely necessary to 
I comment upon the wisdom of giving 
Mart a role in no way related to the 
West. To satisfy the public demand for 
D such a change was but a natural step. 

the wonder being that it was not taken 
I sooner. As a convict and later as a re- 
I formed crook he makes of the present 
|| part as interesting and genuine a char- 
I acterization as any that have gone 
I before. It promised to be an excellent 
I story, too, but the director or the author 
I seems to have lost confidence as the 
| play approached the crisis. Here a won- 
I derful opportunity for a strong finish 
' was worked up, only to he passed over 
so hastily as to rob the picture of much 
of the good effect already made. It is, 
as it stands, a human little story that 
will give fair satisfaction. It should 
have been one of the best photoplays 
ever made. 

SYNOPSIS: "Hairpin Harry" Dutton 
is released from prison after serving ten 
years of a fourteen year sentence. Bos- 
ton Blackie, his old pal, takes him back 
to Frisco, where he learns that the wife 
he has believed faithful has divorced 
him and married the policeman who 
testified against him. He meets his ten- 
year-old son and they become great 
friends, surreptitiously. His former 
wife learns of his presence and her hus- 
band promises to "plant a gun on him" 
and send him back to prison. But his 
son overhears their plot and innocently 
lets his father know of it in time. Harry- 
then goes to the detective's home and is 
about to brand his former wife upon 
the cheek when his son intervenes and 
asks him to take him away. Harry leaves 
the woman unharmed and takes his son 
to the wilderness, where they find happi- 
ness in each other's love. 



Carlyle Blackwell in 

HIT OR MISS 

Five-part comedy drama; World. 
Directed by Dell Henderson. 
Published March 24. 

OPINION: If the group of summer 
resort girls who appear now and then 
in the course of the play, without plot 
justification or advancement, were al- 
lowed to sing a few light numbers about 
the "lonesome moon" or the delights of 
"beach bathing," the composition could 
be classed as one of those hybrids known 
I as a "comedy with music." It is just that 
sort of a story, acted in just that style. 
But the music is missing, and the play 
shows plainly the absence of its support. 
i ; As it stands, it is simply a sequence of 
mildly engaging incidents through which 
Carlyle Blackwell and Evelyn Greeley 
| conduct their wooing and the thwarting 
' of the light comedy villain. There wasn't 
much to do with in the first place, but 
Dell Henderson has made the best of it. 
! The actors seem never more than actors. 
M No chance is given to forget that it is 



an attempt to amuse. It is not up to 
the standard of the present day general 
market. 

SYNOPSIS: J. Butterfly Conroy, press 
agent, is given tive hundred dollars of 
his father's fortune and told that more 
will be his when he does something 
worth while for humanity. At a cafe he 
meets Mary Bruce MacDowell, daughter 
of an eccentric entymologist, and later 
goes to a summer resort near her home. 
Frank Morrison, idler, seeks to win her. 
So does Ybor Cavallo Escammillo, Bra- 
zilian naturalist. Her father disapproves 
of Conroy, the lady herself accepting his 
proposal. They are secretly married, 
then apparently compromised by a storm 
which keeps them away from the house 
over .night. Next morning Ybor at- 
tempts to rifle the safe, imprisoning the 
professor in his laboratory and setting it 
afire. Conroy arrives in time to rescue 




A drsimatic scene from "The Poppy Girl's 
Husband," an Artcraft feature, 
Starring William S. Hart. 



the professor and catch the villain. The 
young people are forgiven and all ends 
well. 



Frank Keenan in 

THE SILVER GIRL 

Five Part Drama; Pathe. 
Directed by Frank Keenan. 
Published April 6. 

OPINION: A title which does not make 
a great appeal to the curiosity is the 
one weak point of the composition. 
Keenan's forceful personality and keen 
appreciation of dramatic values makes 
his work in the play its strongest point. 
A role that would not otherwise have 
impressed as strikingly individual is by 
him made intensely human and appeal- 
ing. Present in almost every scene of 
the picture he dominates the whole, yet 
never tires. The plot has little to lift 
it out of the rut of the ordinary, but 
with the co-operation of Katherine 
\dams, George Hernandez and Her- 

35 



schell Mayall the star gives it strength. 
It is a photoplay that will qualify as 
"better class" before any audience. And 
any exhibitor should be able to market 
it advantageously. 

SYNOPSIS: Jefferson Hunter and 
"Chuck" Wilson are partners in a mine 
which will pay big returns if capital for 
development is procured. Hunter mar- 
ries Anne Kepple, some years his junior, 
and yields to her request that they go 
East. Here they enter society and he 
manages to obtain backing. Anne meets 
Nathan Hargrave, whom she has pre- 
viously known in the west, and they plan 
to leave Hunter. Parton. a western 
lawyer, seeks to jump Hunter's claim 
and Hunter leaves his wife to go back 
and straighten matters out. Returning 
unexpectedly he finds Anne in Har- 
grave's arms, just as her courage fails 
her and she realizes she loves her hus- 
band. Hunter and Hargrave engage in 
a duel, in which neither is killed. Har- 
grave flees and Anne begs forgiveness. 
Hunter takes her back to the West with 
him and they resume their old life at 
the cabin by the mine. 



Mae Murray in 

THE SCARLET SHADOW 

Six Part Comedy Drama; Universal. 
Directed by Robert Leonard. 
Published March 10. 

OPINION: Mae Murray, she of the 
golden curls and the innocent smile, is 
the mainstay of a production that has 
little in the way of distinguishing origi- 
nality or startling execution. The plot 
is one that has served frequently for 
stars of similar mien. Very heavy, if 
you wish to take it seriously, and very 
light if you prefer to look upon it as 
comedy, it is so constructed that the 
audience may place its own classifica- 
tion upon the story. Miss Murray is just 
exactly the sort of a girl in the play 
that her picture would lead one to believe 
she is in real life. Her support is in 
keeping with the style of the play, the 
necessity of keeping to the borderline 
between 'comedy and drama making their 
work most difficult. Clarissa Selwynne 
registers the best individual bit in the 
production. Mae Murray's admirers 
will doubtless accept the comedy angle 
and find satisfaction in the offering. 

SYNOPSIS: Elena Evans, who lives 
with an old maid aunt of very narrow 
views, lets herself down from her win- 
dow to attend a motion picture show 
with a young admirer. Van Presby, 
visiting in the small town. Unable to 
make the return ascent alone, she is 
assisted by Van and the two are caught 
in Elena's room by her aunt, who insists 
upon a marriage early the next morning. 
Van's uncle arrives in time to prevent 
this but has to promise to keep Elena at 
his city home until Van is old enough 
to marry. Here Van's mother attempts 
to marry Elena to a wealthy but aged 
admirer. Harvery Presby, Van's uncle, 
falls in love with Elena and is loved in 
return. The wealthy suitor is thwarted. 
Van is relieved of his obligation and all 
ends happily. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




EVELYN NESBIT 
In a scene from her latest Fox picture, 
"Thou Shalt Not." 



Anna Q. Nillson in 

THE WAY OF THE STRONG 

Five part drama; Metro. 
Directed by Edwin Carewe. 
Published March 17. 

OPINION: The acting of Anna Q. 
Nillson, who has never done better than 
in this instance, plus the steady support 
of Joe King, a veteran as yet unstarred, 
but certainly worthy of the honor, are 
the best points of the picture. There is 
little in the story to excite comment, 
favorable or otherwise. It's been done 
before, sometimes better and frequently 
not so well. The present version has the 
advantage of easy continuity, excellent 
background and a man-fight at the clos- 
ing, which has the stamp of sincerity. 
Beginning in the Yukon country, the 
story changes at the end of the second 
reel to New York's Wall Street as it 
is in pictures. The contrast is effected 
without a break in the story, thus over- 
coming a popular aversion to the device. 
The action is well directed and evenly 
paced. It is a program picture above 
expectations. 

SYNOPSIS: In the Yukon country 
James Leyburn steals Alexander Hen- 
drie's hoarded gold, his wife and child, 
leaving the latter two to die in a bliz- 
zard. But the child lives and is taken 
in by Monica Norton, half-sister of its 
mother. Leyburn and Hendrie later be- 
come rivals in Wall Street, Leyburn 
keeping his identity secret. Hendrie 
meets Monica, falls in love with her, 
proposes and is accepted. Hendrie 
worsts Heyburn in "the street" and the 
latter slanders him to Monica. She 
breaks the engagement, Hendrie refus- 
ing to tell her of her half-sister's per- 
fidy even to save their love. But Hen- 
drie goes Leyburn's office, learns the 
man's identity and a fierce battle ensues. 
Monica overhears the truth and brings 
the boy to his victorious father. There 
is no longer a barrier between them, 
and the engagement is resumed. 



Evelyn Nesbit in 

THOU SHALT NOT 

Five-part drama; Fox. 
Directed by Charles Brabin. 
Published March 23. 

OPINION: The old story of the small 
town girl with the stern parent and the 
romantic nature, her elopement, deser- 
tion and return to the parental fireside 
to save her heartbroken mother's life, is 
given another telling and a telling which 
endows it with life and power. There 
is a scenario that has been perfectly 
constructed. There are a score or more 
small town characters that could not be 
improved upon. Small town events are 
staged convincingly and in wise modera- 
tion. Crawford Kent, Ned Burton, 
Florida Kingsley and Gladden James 
make their roles walking, breathing real- 
ities. The star is a bit out of her sphere 
as the high school girl in the first reel 
or two, but does noteworthy work when 
the story takes on a serious aspect. It 
is sentimental and a searching expose of 
hypocrisy. It is adult in appeal. But 
it is one of the best pictures that Fox 
has turned out in a long time. 

SYNOPSIS: Ruth Hayes graduates 
from the small town high school where 
she has been educated and begins "go- 
ing with" Alec Peters, a railroad brake- 
man, whom her father dislikes. Forbid- 
den to see him again, she elopes with 
him to New York. Here he postpones 
their marriage indefinitely and finally 
tells her to leave. She goes to a home 
for girls. Her mother wears herself 
with waiting until her life is despaired 
of. The town minister then goes to New 
York and brings Ruth back. She is 
given her old place in the choir, but the 
congregation and the rest of the choir 
object. The minister denounces his 
flock from the pulpit, is denounced in 
turn, and leads Ruth from the church 
amid their sneers. They turn their backs 
upon the little town and go into the 
world to start life anew. 



Helen Terome Eddy in 

THE TURN IN THE ROAD 

Five Part Drama; Exhibitors Mutual. 
Directed by Kin.g W. Vidor. 
Published in March. 

OPINION: Differing radically from the 
ordinary run of pictures, this will un- 
doubtedly appeal especially strongly to 
the class of people who do not attend 
the motion picture theatre regularly. It 
is an opportunity to bring to your play- 
house the serious minded to whom 
comedy and light romance have no at- 
traction. It is a religious play asking 
and answering the question "What is 
God?" Six-year-old Ben Alexander 
shares honors with George Nichols. 
Helen Jerome Eddy and Lloyd Hughes 
in the cast. The success of the film will 
depend entirely upon the class of patron- 
age it is presented to. 

SYNOPSIS: Paul Perry, son of a 
money-mad father, marries the daughter 
of an orthodox minister. His wife's 
sister is deeply in love with him. When 
his wife dies in child birth, Paul loses 
faith in the "God to Whom the will of 
man should meekly bow" and running 
from the house wanders for six years. 
Tn the meantime, his sister-in-law raises 
the son whom Paul has never seen. Lit- 
tle Bob is the means of softening the 
heart of Perry's father and incidentally 
saving him from death at the hands of 
his employes, who demand better living 
conditions and higher wages. Perry, 



returning, is taught by his son that "God 
is love," and finds happiness in the love 
of his son and his sister-in-law. 



William Russell in 

BRASS BUTTONS 

Five Part Comedy; American-Pathe. 
Directed by Henry King. 
Published March 10. 

OPINION : There are enough good 
things in the latest Russell touch-and- 
go performance to more than make up 
for whatever shortcomings in the way of 
plausibility and realism that may be de- 
tected by the super-critical analyst. Of 
logic there is little present, but of speed 
and sprightly, refreshing activity there 
is an abundance. These are the qualities 
demanded by the Russell devotees. 
These are essentials of the light romance 
which is coming to be the most popular 
of film forms. Therefore the picture 
'should satisfy. Russell's role is well 
chosen and taken. Bull Montana and 
Frank Brownlee yield excellent support. 
Eileen Percy has little to do, yet does 
that little ably. A typical Russell pro- 
duction for the general public. 

SYNOPSIS: Kingdon Hollister per- 
suades Officer Callahan to loan him his 
uniform and his beat that he may make 
the acquaintance of a lady's maid whe* 
walks daily thereon, not knowing that 
the maid is really Bernice Cleveland, 
mistress of the house. He makes her 
acquaintance and an affair of the heart 
develops. The mayor of Sawtooth, 
Arizona, comes to town to find a gun 
man from the office of chief of police for 
his terrorized community. "Jake, the 
priest," killer, accepts the job and at- 
tempts to kill officer Callahan before 
leaving for the west. Hollister, as Cal- 
lahan, thwarts the killer and accepts 
the commission, exacting of Bernice the 
promise of her hand if he cleans up the 
town in twenty-four hours. This he 
does and they are wed. "Jake, the 
priest" is made a friend. Officer Calla- 
han becomes a hero and it ends well for 
all concerned. 




William Russell has just found "the right 
blonde" (Arline Percy) in "Brass 
Buttons." ( American-Pathe.) 



36 



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EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTO GRAPH Y 




Olive Thomas in 

TOTON 

Six Part Drama; Triangle. 
Directed by Frank Borzage. 
Published March 30. 

OPINION : Seldom is it given the pub- 
lic to view settings and natural scenery 
of greater beauty more splendidly photo- 
graphed. And it is not often that a 
group of actors combine to produce a 
more perfectly balanced cast character- 
ization. These points make the chief 
demands for attention in this feature 
which Triangle has seen fit to give an 
extra reel of footage. The story is 
one of artists and Apaches, their loves 
and their hates, and the personality of 

; the people as well as the atmosphere 
of their Paris surroundings is realis- 
tically presented. The plot is an affair 

| of many angles and two generations, 
which fact always frustrates singleness 

i of impression, but the telling is grace- 
ful and logical. It is clean and enter- 
taining. There should be a good market 
for it. 

SYNOPSIS: David Lane, American 
artist, is called home from Paris shortly 
after marrying Yvonne, his model, by 
his mother's illness. His father detains 
him and arranges through lawyers to 
break up the union. Pierre, an Apache 
who also loved Yvonne, takes care of 
her until her death at the birth of Toton, 
then taking charge of the baby. Seven- 
teen years later an adopted son of David 
Lane reforms Toton, then the cleverest 
pickpocket in Paris, and employs him as 
studio boy. Lane returns to Paris and 
establishes a chateau. Pierre tells Toton 
of his parentage and the boy attempts to 
be revenged for what he believes is a 
wrong done his mother. How the boy, 
a girl in disguise, learns the truth about 
her father, marries her adopted brother 
and finds happiness makes up the inter- 
esting and unusual conclusion of the 
play. 




HELEN JEROME EDDY 
Star of "The Turn in the Road," Brent- 
wood film Corporation production jiiNt 
purchased by Robertson-Cole for distri- 
bution through Exhibitors Mutual. 



Constance Talmadge in 

EXPERIMENTAL MARRIAGE 

Five-part farce; Select. 
Directed by Robert G. Vignola. 
Published in March. 

OPINION: When a star maintains as 
high a standard of production as does 
Constance Talmadge, there is little ne- 
cessity for comment upon an individual 
publication. The present one is quite in 
line with what has gone before. What 
it lacks in speed is made up in novelty 
of basic idea. And it is an idea which 
will make for universality of appeal. 
Those who are, have been or hope to 
be married will enjoy the working out 
of the "Saturday to Monday" recipe for 
marital happiness. Walter Hier, Harri- 
son Ford and Vera Sisson are co-in- 
volved with Miss Talmadge in the tan- 
gles which result when the plan is put 
into operation, the quartette combining 
to excellent advantage. The situations 
are as delicate as usual, but no more so. 
There are about usual number of unex- 
pected twists and laughable situations. 
It is just the sort of picture that has 
come to be identified with the star's 
name. 

SYNOPSIS: Suzanne Ercoll, femi- 
nist, becomes engaged to Foxcroft Grey, 
lawyer clubman. She is then elected 
president of the Feminist Club. To pre- 
serve her leadership as "deliverer of 
womankind" without sacrificing her 
heart's desire, she insists upon a con- 
tract specifying that the marital state 
shall exist from Saturday to Monday 
only, both contracting parties to be free 
and unencumbered the remainder of the 
week. Rut the first Monday morning, as 
Suzanne is leaving Grey's apartments, 
Dot Harrington, who has visited the 
apartment above as a prank, appears, 
and Suzanne becomes jealous. The girls 
quarrel. The janitor forcibly ejects Su- 
zanne, refusing to believe her story. She 
then visits Arthur Barnard, novelist, 
first sending her husband an "anony- 
mous letter," and he follows. Hut he 
refuses to break his contract by object- 



ing or becoming angry. At last she 
wearies of the arrangement and it is dis- 
carded. 



Florence Reed in 

HER CODE OF HONOR 

Five-part drama; United Picture The- 
atres. 

Directed by John M. Stahl. 
Published March 24. 

OPINION: John M. Stahl lived up to 
his name when he directed the present 
pretentious but essentially commonplace 
photoplay. His settings are beautiful 
to behold and a glance at a single scene 
would convey the impression of pains- 
taking magnificence, but when they are 
strung together end to end over a long 
stretch of only mildly interesting and 
unnaturally retarded action, they lose 
power. The story told is not a pleasant 
one and lacks the redeeming asset of a 
point to be made or a lesson taught. It 
is also one which only the adult mind 
will understand and there is little reason 
for its classification as entertainment 
even to the grown-up. William Des- 
mond does the best work in the piece, 
the story moving so slowly that even 
his earnest efforts lose effect. The star 
poses becomingly, but does little acting. 
There is not a great deal to recommend 
it for general exhibition. 

SYNOPSIS : Alice, who uses a sur- 
name not her own, innocently, becomes 
engaged to Eugene La Salle, whom she 
meets through an automobile accident. 
He attends a house party at the home 
of her benefactor, a man whose love 
for her mother has made him raise her 
from babyhood, and on a moonlit night 
their passion overcomes their patience. 
La Salle goes abroad for a few months 
and returns to learn there is to be a 
child. They agree to be married the 
next day. By reason of a ring which 
La Salle exhibits, a duplicate of that left 
Alice by her mother, it appears that 
they are half-brother and sister. She 
asks La Salle to shoot her and he is 
about to do so when she learns that he 
is an adopted son of her father. They 
decide to be married as planned. 



37 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Harry T. Morey in 

FIGHTING DESTINY 

Five part drama; Vitagraph. 
Directed by Paul Scardon. 
Published March 31. 

OPINION: When Harry Morey is 
given a straight, strong role in a story 
that is logically and compactly put to- 
gether the result is an example of screen 
acting as it should he done. In this 
play, which fulfills such a prescription, 
he demonstrates what can be done by 
sheer force of personality. At no time 
does he seem to be acting. Rather does 
he move through the scenes and react to 
the pressure of circumstances exactly as 
such a man would move and act in real 
life. The play is a serious thing, but 
not made artificial by too concentrated 
attempts to make it impressive. There 
is an important element of mystery 
which is incorporated in such a manner 
as to create commendable suspense. 
Betty Blythe and George Majeroni fig- 
ure largely in support and effect distinc- 
tive characterization. The production 
is clean, strong and worth while. It is of 
the best type of film drama. 

SYNOPSIS : Larry Cavendish, a power 
for good in city politics, becomes en- 
gaged to Caryl Rundledge, daughter of 
Judge Rundledge, candidate for gov- 
ernor. On the night of his farewell 
dinner to the boys his financee disappears 
mysteriously. Judge Rundledge is 
strangely loth to give aid in finding her, 
and a note from Caryl tells Larry not 
to look for her. But he becomes con- 
vinced that she is held captive, willingly 
or otherwise, by one Levarro, chief of 
the pan-handlers in the city. Disguising 
himself as such a person he enters Le- 
varro's den and a fight ensues. The 
house burns, but he traces Caryl, spirited 
away, to a Chinese opium den. Here 
she is accidentally shot and killed. Then 
it develops that her twin sister, an opium 
addict, has been used by Levarro as an 
influence upon Judge Rundledge. Larry 
and Caryl are reunited. 



Monroe Salisbury in 

THE LIGHT OF VICTORY 

Five-part drama; Universal. 
Directed by William Wolbert. 
Published March 17. 

OPINION: -The Man Without a 
Country" has furnished the theme for 
yet another photoplay. In this case no 
attempt is made to follow the story of 
the poem. It is used simply because it 
states more effectively than would new 
phraseology the point to be fnade. The 
play is of rather larger than program 
dimensions. Submarines, ocean liners 
and lighthouses are made use of in the 
telling of the story and considerable 
care has been taken to make the drama 
measure up to the same scale. It is to 
be regretted that the story was hardly 
big enough to fill the container. Still, 
Monroe Salisbury's characterization is, 
as usual, a work of genius and his sup- 
port is in most cases satisfying, (liven 
spirited projection and constructive 
presentation, it possesses possibilities. 
Advertising centered about the star 
should bring his followers, a goodly 
sized body, and his followers will like 
the play. 

SYNOPSIS: George Blendon, lieu- 
tenant in the U. S. Navy, has neglected 
his work and his fiancee, devoting his 
time to drink. When he becomes in- 
toxicated and embarrasses his fiancee 
at a social affair, she returns his ring. 
War is declared and he leaves with his 
ship. At a British port his commander 
seeks to bring him to his senses and 
entrusts him with an important mission 
ashore. He loses the secret code and is 
picked up by brother officers intoxicated. 
He is then stripped of his uniform and 
set ashore on an out-of-the-way island 
and reported dead. He becomes a beach- 
comber, marries a native woman who 
supplies him with gin, and sinks lower 
and lower. His fiancee learns that he 
is alive and sets out to rescue him, but 
her ship is torpedoed and she is taken 
aboard a German submarine The sub- 
marine puts into the island harbor and 



attempts to lure a battleship within 
range. Blendon redeems himself by 
laying down his life to save the cruiser. 



Peggy Hyland in 

THE REBELLIOUS BRIDE 

Five Part Comedy-Drama; Fox. 
Directed by Lynn F. Reynolds. 
Published March 23. 

OPINION : Given a story more suitable 
to her talent than the last few published 
and supplied with an exceptionally good 
supporting cast, Peggy Hyland should 
be well received in "The Rebellious 
Bride." Romance has always been linked 
with the Ozark Mountains, and they 
form a pleasing background for an un- 
usual love story, primed with plenty of 
action. The story calls for several char- 
acter parts, well presented by George 
Nicholls as Grandpa Quimby, George 
Hernandez as Tobe Plunkett, and Charles 
LeMoyne as Jeff Peters. Pell Trenton 
as Arthur Calloway makes a pleasing 
hero. 

SYNOPSIS: Grandpa Quimby attempts 
to compell Cynthy, his granddaughter 
to marry Tobe Plunkett, the village 
school master. Jeff Peters, a worthless 
character in love with Cynthy, volun- 
teers to break up the ceremony and with 
his aid Cynthy runs away. In rage, 
Grandpa Quimby after finding her de- 
clares he will compel her to marry the 
first man they meet. Arthur Calloway, 
a wealthy young man from St. Louis, 
who has landed nearby in his airplane, 
happens to be the first man they meet 
and is escorted to the minister at the 
point of a gun. Both are rebellious but 
after three days they fall in love with 
each other and are well satisfied. Callo- 
way is forced to flee from the neighbor- 
hood when the villagers suspect him of] 
burning the village store and set out to 
lynch him. To save a scandal, Grandpa 
Quimby then attempts to marry Cynthy 
to Tobe Plunkett again. She escapes 
and makes her way to St. Louis and is 
happily reunited with her husband. 



Louise Glaum in 

FORBIDDEN FIRE 

Six-part drama; J. Parker Reed Prod. 
Directed by Arthur Rosson. 
Published State Rights. 

OPINION: C. Gardner Sullivan wrote 
a strong story, Arthur Rosson gave it 
logical direction, and Louise Glaum con- 
tributed a forceful delineation of an ex- 
acting role. Sahara, a background well 
suited to the star's personality and style, 
is represented with attention to detail 
and general effect which removes any 
suggestion of artificiality. Matt Moore 
and Edwin Stevens are excellent in sup- 
port. The story is one for the mature 
and the serious minded, yet it has noth- 
ing in it which will offend the most ex- 
acting. If there is an author writing for 
the screen today whose name means 
anything to the public that man is C.j 
Gardner Sullivan. Use his name and 
that of the star, emphasize the fact that 
the play is characteristic of both and 
done in their best manner, and there is 
no reason why the play should not be 
exhibited to a goodly profit. 

SYNOPSIS: Mignon Stanley, French 
wife of an American engineer, is the cen- 
ter of a circle of male worshipers in 
Paris when her husband is assigned to 
work in the Sahara desert. She consents 
(Continued on page 4o) 




38 



INHIBITORS HERALD 



AND MOTOGRAPH Y 



^'llllliMMIIIP 

Heraldgframs 

HnnaBiiiarauiiBmiiDnniHmiimiiHmmiramiitiimDtiim R. M.mmmmmmmmmmim 

Sprig, Beautiful Sprig! — 

Hurrah! Spring is here. The ladies, God bless 
'em, are putting on their furs. 

Twice in the Same Place — 

It looks as though the w. k. M. P. industry was 
going to be stung by a Bebee bill in Ohio. 

Harry's There With New Stuff- 
Well, Harry Reichenbach slipped one over on the 
wise ones by pulling that injunction stunt. 

Speaking of Bigness — 

William Howard Taft was suggested as a possi- 
bility in connection with the "Big 5" as legal advisor. 

Slipping the Infant Industry the Paregoric — 

According to Springfield, III., dispatches "Drug - 
gist" Dodd will be censor czar if the Buck bill goes 
through. Dodd, who was formerly secretary of state 
board of phannacy, helped draw the censor bill 
arid has been lobbying in its behalf. 

More Trade Paper Talk— 

And now I see it has been decided that five trade 
papers are enough. What's become of the old-fash- 
ioned opinion that one and possibly two was all that 
was necessary. 

William Sievers Said a Chinful — 

He holds the First National franchise in St. Louis 
and in replying to J. D. Williams said: 

"Who is there in the business wants to pour 
through a lot of information about the legitimate 
stage, vaudeville, carnivals and circuses to pick up 
random shots about the motion picture industry?" 

Troubles Never Come Singly— 

We just read in the paper where Charlie Chaplin 
is reported to be almost broke. And his mother-in- 
law is coming on to visit him. 'Stuff, ain't it? 

Exit Thanhouser — 

April 3 will mark the official passing of the old 
Thanhouser company, it is said. Farewell, old friend, 
how we'll miss those familiar draperies and newel 
posts of bygone days. They were always in every 
Thanhouser picture and we got to know them so well 
it will be like the passing of a dear friend. 

Hollander Has Inside Dope — 

From the Chicago correspondent's report of the 
Illinois censorship measure in the New York Telegraph 
we glean this valuable bit of information: "Illinois 
will have state censorship of motion pictures if the 
Assembly passes the Buck bill and Governor Lowden 
signs it." 

Beware of the Blondes — 

One Herald reader writes that he took this col- 
umn's advice and hasn't kissed any blondes this week. 
It seems he lives in Tokio and there ain't no such 
animal there. 

Speaking of Blondes — 

Pity the poor movie leading man. Most all the 
female leads are blondes at some stage of the game, 
you know. 

Utah's No Place for Them— 

They're making it harder for press agents in Utah. 
The legislature is going to pass a bill making it com- 
pulsory for the P. A. to tell the exact truth about his 
show. Thus many a $100,000 production will shrink 
to a mere $750. 



Your weekly music bill 

can be made an investment 
instead of an expense 

The 

Cremona 

Theater Orchestra- 
Organs will do it for you. 




Style O 



The Solo instrument with the 
human voices. 

Two roll system enables oper- 
ator to follow the action of the 

picture with ease and accuracy. 

Plays any 88 note player roll. 

134 note solo roll is a complete 
orchestra within itself. 

Why not write us today for 
information regarding this most 
modern instrument and its 
adaptability to your theater? 



THE MARQUETTE 
PIANO COMPANY 

Factory and General Offices 

2439 Wallace St. CHICAGO 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Next Beach Drama 
"Crimson Gardenia" 
Has Notable Cast 

"The Crimson Gardenia" will be the 
next Rex Beach drama following that 
author's "The Brand," conceded to be 
the most powerful and satisfying Rex 
Beach production ever made. "The 
Crimson Gardenia" holds every promise 
of equaling the impression made by the 
drama of the Yukon and at the same 
time revealing another phase of the 
author's story-telling genius. As a novel 
it has steadily increased in popularity 
since its publication three years ago and 
today still holds its place among the 
best sellers. 

Work on the production is progressing 
at the Goldwyn studios in Culver City, 
Calif., under the direction of Mr. Beach 
and Reginald Barker, who contributed 
his directorial skill in adding to the box- 
office magnetism of "The Brand." 
New Orleans Story 

Forsaking Alaska and the Frozen 
North for the moment, Rex Beach 
places the locale of "The Crimson Gar- 
denia" in romantic New Orleans at the 
height of the carnival season. The 
Mardi Gras is in full swing and every 
detail of the brilliant pageant is shown, 
serving as background for a story in 
which romance, adventure and intrigue 
have equal parts, with constant action 
always. 

The amazing plot of a band of coun- 
terfeiters to defraud the Government 
is shown, together with evidence of their 
seeming success, until by the very force 
of a tender romance their workings are 
uncovered and the wheels of justice 
crush them. This web of love and in- 
trigue involves interesting characters 
unlike the primitive men and women 
Rex Beach usually infuses with life. The 
bored New York society men, the dash- 
ing Creole girl, the cunning leader of 
the counterfeiters and his desperate 
aides — these are the people who pool their 
destinies in the gay carnival and each is 
finally overwhelmed by the forces he has 
set in motion. 

Owen Moore in Cast 

Co-operating with Samuel Goldwyn, 
Rex Beach has assembled an extraordi- 
nary cast. "The Crimson Gardenia" 
brings back Owen Moore to the screen. 
A leading figure in motion pictures in 
his own right, he is equally well known 
as the husband of Mary Pickford. His 
return to the cinema could hardly be 
made under more auspicious circum- 
stances. 

Other players of reputation are Hedda 
Nova, who assumes the leading feminine 
role; Tully Marshall, promising to dupli- 
cate his successful portrayal in Madge 
Kennedy's "Daughter of Mine" with a 
part entirely unlike that of sympathetic 
Papa Mendelsohn in the Hugo Ballin 
picture, and Edwin Stevens. The famous 
creator of the Devil in Molnar's stage 
sensation makes his debut in Goldwyn 
Pictures. Hector V. Sarno, chosen bv 
Mr. Beach for his "Heart of the Sunset" 
has a more important part to play in 
"The Crimson Gardenia." With Sydney 
Ainsworth. Alec B. Francis, Sydney 
Deane. Kate Lester, Gertrude Claire 
and Tina Marshall it is confidently ex- 
pected that histrionically the coming 
Rex Beach production will be without a 
flaw. 




Ethel Clayton in the title role of "Private 
Pettigrew's Girl," her latest 
Paramount produetion. 



Red Gross Divisions 

Buy 22 Cameragraphs 

The activities shown by the New York 
office of the United Theatre Equipment 
Corporation in installing Powers' Cam- 
eragraphs are particularly noticeable 
where the Red Cross is concerned. 

The company recently sold twenty- 
two Cameragraphs to the various divi- 
sions of the Red Cross as follows: Fort 
Sheridan, 111., Base Hospital No. 10, 
West Roxbury, Mass.; New York City, 
U. S. Debarkation Hospital No. 1, Ellis 
Island; U. S. General Hospital No. 38, 
Eastview, N. Y.; Camp Merritt, N. J.; 
Fort Des Moines, Iowa, Fort Dodge, 
Iowa; Fort McHenry, Maryland; Camp 
Custer, Mic.h.; Camp Eustis, Va.; Nor- 
folk, Va., Quantico, Va. ; Richmond Col- 
lege, Richmond, Va.; Camp Stuart, New- 
port News, Va.; Camp Funston, Kansas; 
Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y. Base 
Hospital, Mineola, Long Island. 



Better Service Booklets 

The Transportation Committee of N. 
A. M. P. I. has received a quantity of 
"Better Service Leaflets," issued by the 
American Railway Express Company. 
These tell in detail little things that can 
be done by the shipper to aid in the 
improvement of the express service. 

A copy of this booklet will be sent 
to exchange managers on request. 



Buy Story for Nesbit 

"My Little Sister," one of the season's 
best sellers, has been bought by William 
Fox as a starring vehicle for Evelyn 
Nesbit, who will begin work on it im- 
mediately. "My Little Sister" was writ- 
ten by Elizabeth Robins, an English au- 
thor, and more than a million copies 
already have been sold, on both sides of 
the- Atlantic. 



London Film Man Here 

B. Nichols, who is general manager of 
the Motion Picture Sales Agency, Ltd., 
of London, reached New York last Sat- 
urday. He is stopping at the Astor ho- 
tel. 



"The Fire Flingers" 

Rupert Julian's Next 

Rupert Julian, whose "The Kaiser, the 
Beast of Berlin" proved one of the most 
sensational pictures of the great war, 
will be seen upon the screen shortly 
playing the dual leading role of "The 
Fire Flingers" a screen-drama recently 
completed at Universal City. 

Provided with a story, adapted from 
W. J. Neidig's Saturday Evening Post 
narrative, Julian is said to have done 
some exceptional acting and directing 
in his latest screen offering. The cast 
includes Jane Novak, Fay Tincher, Will 
Jefferis, Fritzi Ridgeway, William Lloyd, 
Clyde Fillmore, E. A. Warren and Fred 
Kelsey. Julian has enacted the parts of 
Richard Olwell, a wealthy but unfaith- 
ful printer and that of Richard Hatton, 
an ex-convict who poses as the printer 
following the former's untimely death. 



Tacoma Boards Demand 

Gleaner Picture Films 

TACOMA, WASH.— For a discussion 
of the motion picture business in gen- 
eral, and higher ideals and more lofty 
sentiment in future photoplay produc- 
tions, members of the Film Board of 
Trade, comprising exchange managers 
and representatives of producing and 
distributing companies, met at the Ta- 
coma Hotel at luncheon with theatre 
managers from Tacoma, Seattle and 
Southwest Washington. 

It was generally conceded by the ex- 
change heads and the managers that the 
photoplays of the immediate future must 
exemplify more lofty ideals, and have 
in them an appeal for the more clean and 
wholesome things in life. 

Unusual Posters for 

Craig Kennedy Serial 

Following the precedent Oliver Films, 
Inc., established in progressing a step 
beyond the usual in its production of 
"The Carter Case," a Craig Kennedy 
Serial, and in the publicity campaign 
which launched this episode photoplay 
into instantaneous success, Harry 
Grossman has prepared for distribution 
among exhibitors a collection of posters 
which in striking attractiveness and at- 
tention riveting originality, equals any- 
thing thus far attempted in display ad- 
vertising. 



New Fisher Vehicle 

The screening of "Charge It To Me," 
in which the American Film Company, 
Inc., is starring Margarita Fisher, has 
now been completed. The picture will 
be published April 27. 

FORBIDDEN FIRE 

(.Continued from page 38) 
to go along, her desire to see Cairo be- 
ing the real motive. They go first to 
the desert, and developments then post- 
pone the trip to Cairo until Mignon 
grows impatient and finally elopes with 
Baron Alexis, a Russian nobleman. He 
establishes her in a palatial home and 
for a while she is happy, but the love 
for her child brings her to a realizatior 
of her mistake. Going into the "Streel 
of the Beggars" she finds her husbanc 
among them, his mind having failed be 
cause of her desertion. She takes hin 
and the child back to the desert an< 
nurses him back to health. 



40 



TWO WAYS TO "CIRCUS" A FEATURE 



A circus is a periodic visitor. 

A circus is first, last and always, a bargain. 

There never was a circus of standing that didn't give more entertainment for the admission charged than could be bought with that 
same expenditure at any other place. 

No circus goer ever complained that he didn't get his money's worth. 

You may have heard complaints that the show wasn't as good as expected, that it didn't come up to last year's standard, that this or 
that feature was not as good as advertised to be, but you never heard anyone say that they didn't see more for their money than they 
could have seen anywhere else in the same time for the same price. 

Remember these things when you "circus" a picture. 



THE DETAILS OF THE JOB 

The exhibitor who decides to exploit 
a certain feature along what are popu- 
larly known as "circus' lines knows at 
once what steps he must take. They 
are simply adaptations of those taken 
by the management of the circus. 

He must advertise far and wide. 

He must use space, space, and then 
more space. 

He must use bill boards, windows, 
newspapers, ash barrels, fences, house- 
to-house heralds, banners and street 
cars. 

He must use red ink, black ink, blue 
ink, big type, little type, pictures and cut- 
outs. 

In brief, he must forget everything 
but the one big object, to let everybody 
in town know he is offering a bargain. 
The First, the Easiest Way 

That is all there is to the first way to 
"circus" a feature. 

That, unfortunately, is the way all too 
great a number of exhibitors do the 
thing. 

Of course it brings the business. Then 
the exhibitor leans back in his office 
chair, counts his earnings, wires the pro- 
ducer an account of the marvelous suc- 
cess of his attraction, gets his name in 
an ad in a trade paper and counts the 
week a success. 

If business drops off the following 
week he wonders what is wrong, writes 
a lot of letters to his various program 
exchanges asking a reduction in rental 
prices, cuts down house expenses and 
economizes generally. 

Anon comes another feature salesman 
with another picture that can be cir- 
cuserl. Memory of the last success 
prompts the exhibitor to buy. He makes 
another campaign as big as the first one. 

But it doesn't work. 

What follows depends upon the man. 
He may sell out. He may have to sell 
out. 

lie may learn. 

The Second, the Better Way 

His mistake was a simple one. 
He thought that advertising was every- 
thing. 



He was right, as far as he went. 
Advertising is everything. 
But you must have something to ad- 
vertise. 

Had he followed up the circus idea a 
little further the story would have been 
different. He would have had a real 
show for his people when his people 
came. 

He would have had a big show. Be- 
cause the picture was two reels longer 
than the usual program release he would 
not have cut down on his short subjects. 

He would have had just as many reels 
of comedy, maybe one or two more. He 
would have had a news reel, a travel 
feel and an animated cartoon. 

He would have added a singer or a 
soloist for the occasion. 

In effect, he would have divided the 
responsibility of his shozv. 

It is not possible that a certain picture 
is going to please everybody. 




Andrew Knr/iis, of Woodlawn Theatre, 
Chicago, used the above striking 
display with telling- ell'eet 
when putting on "Out 
of the Fog." 



No one act in a circus ever carried the 
whole performance on its back. 

Why try to make a feature picture 
do it? 

Advertise the feature. Emphasize the 
feature. Promise everything for the fea- 
ture. 

But back it up with so many short, 
added attractions that some of them 
must please those whom the feature dis- 
appoints. 

Quality, by all means, should come 
first. 

Quantity is never a satisfactory substi- 
tute. 

BUT — it is a mighty fine assistant. 



By all means "circus" the feature. 
But— 

Be sure you have a feature. 
Be sure you back it up. 



Does Lobby Spread Pay ? 



Considering the great number of ex- 
amples which recent history supplies 
of lobby decorations, which have "made" 
various big pictures, many advocates of 
that particular form of advertising are 
at a loss to know why the scheme is 
not more widely adopted and more gen- 
erally practiced. 

Not enough big theatres, say some. 

Costs too much to pull them, say 
others. 

What is the truth of the matter? 

Study of the proposition boils it down 
to a very simple statement. 

One must be careful of establishing 
precedents. 

That which becomes familiar loses 
value. 

That which is expected does not thrill. 

There can be no doubt that the lav- 
ishly decorated lobby brings business. 
The first time it is used it sets every- 
body to talking. Word of mouth ad- 
vertising is the best variety obtainable. 

Tlie second time it is used people say, 
"Well, I see the Palace has another 
foxy lobby this week." The reply is. 
"O, have they?" The conversation turns 
to other things. 



41 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



WORKING UP INTEREST IN A SERIAL 




Window display suggested by Grosset & Dunlap, publisher**, to arouse publie interest in 
the Houdini serial, "The Master Mystery." (Octagon Films, Inc.) 



The third time it is done the passerby 
notes the effort in silence, remembers 
perhaps, but is not impulsed to mention 
the fact to the next man he meets. 

But the third attempt, and each suc- 
ceeding attempt, costs just as much as 
the first. 

The expense continues. 

The revenue stops. 

The lobby spread pays — if you don't 
do it too often. 

A Better Medium 

But the basic idea is sound. 

There is a way to make it a permanent 
value. 

Take the display out of the lobby. 

It is more than probable that your 
theatre building has store rooms in the 
same building. If you have or can get 
control of a window right beside your 
lobby you can use the decorative scheme 
to real advantage. 

Fit up such a window attractively as 
a general display window. 

Then approach a merchant in your 
neighborhood who has a desirable win- 
dow and suggest a trade in window space. 

The merchant will profit by exhibiting 
his wares in your window by reason of 
the patrons that come to our theatre 
nightly, patrons who must pass the win- 
dow. In addition you may run a screen 
advertisement for him gratis. 

Then set up your display in his win- 
dow. 

It should not be very difficult to 
manage a change of windows weekly. 
Place your display in a new location 
every week. Give a different merchant 
the advantage of your location every 
week. 

The shifting about will provide the 
novelty which the strict lobby display so 
soon loses. Appearing weekly in a new 
and unexpected place the ad will gain 
the advantage of circulation and become 
in effect a general canvass of the neigh- 
borhood or town. 

Never make the mistake of linking 
your display with the goods sold by the 
merchant whose windows you are using. 



To do so is to cheapen that merchant's 
goods and your advertisement as well, 
consequently your theatre. 

Keep your display distinctively in- 
dividual. The cut reproduced elsewhere 
in this department, showing a set used 
by Mr. Andrew Karzas, Woodlawn 
Theatre, Chicago, is a good example to 
follow. 

Be fair, and give the merchant with 
whom you trade the same consideration. 
Identify yourself in no way with his 
window. 

Both of you will profit. And it will be 
a steady profit, not a "flash in the pan." 



When You Play a Return 
Date 



When you play the next return date 
on a picture we know of no better 
stunt to use in exploiting it than that 
which we find carried out in the "Gem 
Movie News," several copies of which 
come to our desk from the Harris-Lynch 
Enterprises, operating this theatre on 
the outskirts of Peoria, 111. 

The paper is just about as interesting 
a house organ as has come to hand in 
a long time. It is a four-page affair, 
very similar in style to the small town 
newspaper, attractively broken up by 
cuts which illustrate the matter taken up 
in its columns. 

Each headline consists of a day and 
date. But the matter which follows 
is in every instance written in news- 
paper style and treats of past incidents 
which lead up nicely to the description 
of the picture or pictures to be pre- 
sented on that day. It is anything but 
"cut and dried" in character and cer- 
tainly must enjoy a wide reading. 

The Gem recently returned "The Lad 
and the Lion" for its third showing at 
thai theatre. And in hold face type 
the paper sets forth the signed state- 
ments of fifteen residents of the com- 



munity who saw the picture when before 
exhibited. Full names and addresses 
are given. The comments are all favor- 
able. 

If there is anyone left in the neigh- 
borhood who has not seen the picture 
they certainly must feel a desire to see 

it now. 

Book Display Aids 

Serial Exploitation 

A source of advertising which is creat- 
ing a great volume of public interest in 
"The Master Mystery," B. A. Rolfe's 
super-serial starring Houdini, produced 
for Octagon Films, Inc., is the method 
employed in exploiting the novelization 
of the story published by Grosset & 
Dunlap. The book was written by Ar 
thur B. Reeve and John W. Grey after 
the scenario created by Arthur B. Reeve 
and Chas. A. Logue. 

Through its distributing agencies 
Grosset & Dunlap is placing the novel 
ization of "The Master Mystery" in the 
book stores of every city where the pic 
ture is being shown. Each shipment of 
books made by Grosset & Dunlap is ac 
companied by a suggestion for a window 
display consisting of an attractively ar 
ranged lay-out of the books, embellished 
by the use of a quantity of 11x14 and 22x 
28 lobby photos. 

So that booksellers will co-operate 
with the exhibitor and make the dis 
play at a time mutually beneficial, Gros 
set & Dunlap does not furnish th 
lobby photograph embellishments, bu 
advises each of their customers to appl 
to the nearest theatre showing the Hou 
dini serial for them. As a consequence 
the exhibitor is brought into actual con 
tact with the book dealer with the resul 
that both co-operate to the benefit of al 
concerned. 



Lenten Film Success 

The Lenten season is witnessin 
extraordinary activity in the Vitagrap 
branch offices in connection with book 
ings on the five-reel feature, "From th 
Manger to the Cross," a presentation o 
the life of Christ from His birth i 
Bethlehem to the final tragedy on Cal 
vary. It is the only picture ever take 
in Palestine and Egypt. 



Joins Goldwyn Staff 

Thompson Buchanan, author o 
"Thirty a Week," and other plays, has 
been engaged by Goldwyn Pictures, and 
is now on the west coast as a member 
of the scenario department. 

Mr. Buchanan was formerly a Louis- 
ville, Ky., newspaper man and dramatic 
critic, and is the author of several sue-; 
cessful novels. 



Bordoni on Screen 

Irene Bordoni, at present starring in 
the stage production "Sleeping Part- 
ners," will be seen in the cast of "Vir- 
tuous Men," the forthcoming S-L pic- 
ture. This marks Miss Bordoni's debut 
upon the screen and in the several scenes 
in which she appears, it is said, wears 
some striking and distinctive gowns. 



42 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



What the Picture Did For Me 

VERDICTS ON FILMS IN LANGUAGE OF EXHIBITOR 

Copyright, 1919 



The criticisms contained in this department of Exhibitors Herald and Motography are truthful statements relative 
to the actual box office value of the pictures. If the picture you wish to know about is not included, write Exhibitors 
Herald and Motography and the information will be sent you promptly. Using blank form on last page of department, 
write us your experience with the pictures you are showing. Address Exhibitors Herald and Motography, 417 South 
Dearborn street, Chicago, III. 



Artcraft 

Mr. Fix-It, with Douglas Fairbanks. — 
Played for the American trade on this 
and got it. Very good picture. Change 
from the Westerns that we have had 
Douglas in lately. — E. L. Franck, Oasis 
Theatre, Ajo, Ariz. — Border mining 
town. 

Wolves of the Rail, with William S. 
Hart. — Best Hart picture we have had 
on the Artcraft program. It will put new 
life into the Hart fans. — R. L. Hensler, 
Bijou Theatre, Carrollton, 111. 

Private Peat, with Harold Peat. — Poor 
and drew poor. — J. Henkle Henry, Em- 
pire Theatre, Winchester, Ya. 

How Could You Jean, with Mary Pick- 
ford. — One of Mary's best. Will please 
all classes. — A. S. Picker, Rex Theatre, 
Ironwood, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

Border Wireless, with William S. 
Hart.— S. R. O. The best Hart yet.— W. 
H. Griffith's, Union Hall Theatre, Smith- 
field, Utah. — Mixed patronage. 

Mr. Fix-It, with Douglas Fairbanks. — 
Fine. Good business in spite of snow 
storm. — Geo. W. Summer, Dixie Theatre, 
Clay Center, Neb. — Small town patron- 
age. 

Border Wireless, with William S. 
Hart. — Great stuff. Record breaker with 
us. Get it if you can. — Will. F. Krahm, 
Lorin Theatre, Berkeley, Cal. — Suburban 
patronage. 

The Goat, with Fred Stone. — We can 
not understand why this picture has 
been roasted. It drew fair and more 
than pleased. — F. R. Smith, Bijou 
Theatre, Fond du Lac, Wis. — General 
patronage. 

Border Wireless, with William S. 
Hart. — One of Hart's best. Good busi- 
ness for two days. — A. H. West, Babcock 
Theatre, Billings, Mont. — General pat- 
ronage. 

How Could You Jean, With Mary 
Pickford. — C. J. Woodmance, American 
Theatre, New Ulm, Minn. — General pat- 
ronage. 

Arizona with Douglas Fairbanks. — 
One of Fairbanks' best. Drew big.- — 
James Palmer, Palace Theatre, Ham- 
monton, N. J. — Middle class patronage. 

Heart of The Wilds, with Elsie Fer 
guson. — A better picture than we looked 
for. — F. R. Smith, Bijou Theatre, Fond- 
du Lac, Wis. — General patronage. 

Bluebird 

The Sea Flower, with Juanita Hansen. 
— Just an average Bluebird to average 
business. — J. B. Stine, Gem Theatre, 
Clinton, Ind. — Mining town. 




May Allison would prefer playing on her 
ukelele instead of a frying; pan. A 
scene from Metro's "Island 
of Intrigue." 

The Deciding Kiss, with Edith Roberts. 
— Dandy star. I made money on this 
picture. Give me more of this kind. — 
Henry Nelson, Rex Theatre, Blooming 
Prairie, Minn. — Middle class patronage. 

The Cabaret Girl, with Ruth Clifford.— 
Good picture. Fine story, well pro- 
duced. — Will F. Krahn, Lorin Theatre. 
Berkeley, Cal. — Suburban patronage. 

When a Girl Loves, with Mildred 
Harris. — Not up to the standard of her 
former productions. Box office receipts 
proved it. — F. G. Heller, Starland 
Theatre, Anderson, Ind. — High class 
patronage. 

Exhibitors Mutual 

The Prodigal Liar, with William Des- 
mond. — A corking western comedy 
drama. More pictures of this kind 
would help all .exhibitors. — P. K. 
Anton, Royal Theatre, New Castle, Ind. 
— Mixed patronage. 

The Ghost of Rosy Taylor, with Mary 
Miles Minter. — V.ery good. Photography 
and tinting shows sweet little star to best 
advantage. — C. A. Rollins, Wigwam 
Theatre, Sheffield, 111. — General Patron- 
age. 

A Trick of Fate, with Bessie Rarri- 
scale — Very good picture. Should please 
all. — A. S. Picker, Rex Theatre. Iron- 
wood, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 



Hearts or Diamonds, with William 
Russell. — Very good picture. Star is 
great. Support also good. — C. A. Rollins, 
Wigwam Theatre, Sheffield, 111. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

The Eleventh Commandment, with Lu- 
cille Lee Stewart — Fine. Better than 
most so-called specials. Pleases good 
crowds at 25c admission. — P. K. Anton, 
Royal Theatre, New Castle, Ind. — Mixed 
patronage. 

First National 

Virtuous Wives, with Anita Stewart- 
Book this picture, as it will go over big. 
Title has great drawing power. — Charles 
H. Ryan, Garfield Theatre, Chicago, 111. 
— Neighborhood patronage. 

Our Teddy (Formerly The Fighting 
Roosevelts) — Did not draw well after 
first day.— Fred Bosnian, Electric Thea- 
tre, St. Joseph, Mo.— Mixed patronage. 

Virtuous Wives, with Anita Stewart— 
One of the very best pictures ever shown 
at our house. Very high class. This is 
our second record breaker. — Mrs. J A 
Dostal, Ideal Theatre, Omaha, Neb.— 
Neighborhood patronage. 

Our Teddy, (Formerlv The Fightin- 
Roosevelts.)— Lay off of it. A big fliv- 
ver at an outrageous price.— A. S. Wida- 
man, Centennial Theatre, Warsaw, Ind. 

Tarzan of the Apes, with Elmo Lin- 
coln.— Drew the same in two nights that 
Romance of Tarzan did in one. Exhi- 
bitors should advertise the fact that 
first picture was not complete. This 
caused complaint from everybody— J 
Henkle, Empire Theatre, Winchester, 
Va. 

A Dog's Life, with Charlie Chaplin — 
Pretty good.— Geo. W. Summer. Dixie 
Theatre, Clay Center, Neb.— Small town 
patronage. 

Virtuous Wives with Anita Stewart— 
Exceptionally heavy business.— J. W 
Sayre, Liberty Theatre, Seattle, Wash.— 
All classes of patronage. 

Virtuous Wives, with Anita Stewart— 
I hree days capacity. A great matinee 
picture. — F. G. Heller, Starland Theatre 
Anderson, Ind.— High class patronage. 

Tempered Steel, with Olga Petrova.— 
Good picture. One of Petrova's best- 
Fred Bosnian, Electric Theatre. St. 
Joseph, Mo. — Mixed patronage. 

Fox 

The Queen of Hearts, with Virginia 
Pearson.— Star and plot great, but she 
should be put in bigger stuff. Fox 
getting better.— William Francis. South 
Side Theatre, Greensburg, Ind.— Middle 
class patronage. 



43 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Les Miserables, with William Farnum. 
— Extra good. — Charles De Paul, Dream- 
land Theatre, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. — 
General patronage. 

The Blindness of Divorce, with an all 
star cast. — A powerful arraignment of 
the divorce courts. More powerful 
preachment against the evils of divorce 
than the pulpit. Highly entertaining as 
well. All classes should see it. Draws 
better second night. — J. C. Jenkins, 
Auditorium Theatre, Neiligh, Neb. 

Riders of the Purple Sage, with Will- 
iam Farnum.— Best Farnum ever made. 
Big business for two days. — Charles De 
Paul, Dreamland Theatre, Sault Ste. 
Marie, Mich. — General patronage. 

Salome, with Theda Bara. — Great, 
Played to largest Sunday crowd in his- 
tory of house. Capacity business all 
week. — E. Metzger, Rialto Theatre, Des 
Moines, la. — Down town patronage. 

I'll Say So, with George Walsh. — 
Walsh pictures please my patrons. 
Plenty of pep and action. — R. H. Sink, 
Pastime Theatre, Greenville, O. — High 
class patronage. 

The Moral Law, with Gladys Brock- 
well. — Pretty good. Stormy weather 
spoiled business. — Geo. W. Summer, 
Dixie Theatre, Clay Center, Neb. — Small 
town patronage. 

For Freedom, with William Farnum. — 
Couldn't take care of people. Broke box 
office receipts. Many good remarks. — 
William Francis, South Side Theatre, 
Greensburg, Ind. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

Under the Yoke, with Theda Bara. — 
Very good picture. Plenty of action. — 
C. J. Woodmance, American Theatre, 
New Ulm, Minn. — General patronage. 

Queen of the Sea, with Annette Keller- 
man. — Drew well. Picture nothing extra. 
— James Palmer, Palace Theatre, Ham- 
monton, N. J. — Middle class patronage. 

Goldwyn 

The Hell Cat, with Geraldine Farrar. — 
Not as good as Farrar's former pic- 
tures, although a good production. — A. 
S. Widaman, Centennial Theatre, War- 
saw, Ind. 

For the Freedom of the World, a 

Goldwyn Special. — A great patriotic 
picture. We recommend this one. 
Pleased everyone. — J. W. Baird, Crystal 
Theatre, Plattonsburg, Mo. 

Oh Johnny, with Louis Bennison. — 
Star should make good with better grade 
of story. Well directed/ — A. H. West, 
Babcock Theatre, Billings, Mont. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

Laughing Bill Hyde, with Will Rogers. 
— Heard no remarks one way or other 
but personally I thought it a pretty fair 
picture. Believe Rogers could be made 
into a good drawing card. — R. J. Relf, 
Star Theatre, Decorah, la. 

Shadows, with Geraldine Farrar. — Star 
a perfect fit into good story. Well di- 
rected. — A. H. West, Babcock Theatre, 
Billings, Mont. — General patronage. 

A Perfect Lady, with Madge Kennedy. 
— Fine play, fine star and well produced. 
Give us more like this. — A. S. Widaman, 
Centennial Theatre, Warsaw, Tnd. 

Laughing Bill Hyde, with Will Rogers. 
— Good picture. Business good. — C. J. 
Woodmance, American Theatre, New 
Ulm, Minn. — General patronage. 



The Racing Strain, with Mae Marsh. — 
Delightful. Do not recall anything bet- 
ter this star has done. Good story well 
acted. Good business. — R. L. Hensler, 
Bijou Theatre, Carrollton, 111. 

The Service Star, with Madge Ken- 
nedy. — Good picture. Many favorable 
comments. — E. L. Franck, Oasis Theatre, 
Ajo, Ariz. — Border mining town. 

Laughing Bill Hyde, with Will Rogers. 
— Picture very much out of the ordinary. 
Satisfying. Fair business. — F. R. Beit- 
man, Tacoma Theatre, Indianapolis, Ind. 
— Middle class patronage. 

Heart of the Sunset, a Goldwyn Spe- 
cial. — Pleased everyone. — J. W. Baird, 
Crystal Theatre, Plattonsburg, Mo. 

All Woman, with Mae Marsh. — Drew 
•fine and pleased. — J. Henkle Henry, 
Empire Theatre, Winchester, W. Va. 

For the Freedom of the World, Gold- 
wyn Special. — Tlie greatest story we 
have seen on the screen in three years 
as an exhibitor. This will surely please 
your patrons. Night battle a great scene. 
— J. W. Baird, Crystal Theatre, Plattons- 
bug, Mo. 

Day Dreams, with Madge Kennedy. — 
Very nifty to good business. — Star well 
liked.— A. H. West, Babcock Theatre, 
Billings, Mont. — General patronage. 

Day Dreams, with Madge Kennedy. — 
Too much fairy stuff. Drew on her past 
reputation. — W. H. Mart, Strand Theatre, 
Grinnell, la. — College town. 

Shadows, with Geraldine Farrar. — Fair 
picture. Business poor. — F. G. Heller, 
Starland Theatre, Anderson, Ind. High 
class patronage. 

Jewel 

Too Fat to Fight, with Frank Mcln- 
tyre. — Good, but no business. War stuff 
dead.— W. H. Mart, Strand Theatre, 
Grinnell, la. — College town. 

For Husbands Only, with Mildred 
llarris. — A really good production. — A. 
S. Widaman, Centennial Theatre, War- 
saw, Ind. 

For Husbands Only, with Mildred 
Harris. — -Played this picture on a Sun- 
day night to a full house. — E. Saunders, 
Saunders Palace Theatre, Harvard, 111. 

The Doctor and the Woman, with Mil- 
dred Harris. — An average picture. Rental 
too high. I advertised this picture but 
made no money. — Henry Nelson, Rex 
Theatre, Blooming Prairie, Minn. — Mid- 
dle class patronage. 

Sirens of the Sea, with Jewel Carmen, 
— Pulled unusually well and pleased 
again. — F. G. Heller, Starland Theatre, 
Anderson, Ind. — High class patronage. 

Metro 

Out of the Fog, with Nazimova. — Best 
picture shown here. Star always draws 
the crowd. Book it. — Lyric Theatre, 
Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

The Gold Cure, with Viola Dana. — A 
most pleasing comedy drama. Metro 
is coming. — A. S. Widaman, Centennial 
Theatre, Warsaw, Ind. 

The Poor Rich Man, with Bushman 
and Bayne. — Drew well and a very fine 
and pleasing picture. — J. Henkle Henry, 
Empire Theatre, Winchester, Va. 

My Own United States, with Arnold 
Daly. — F.xtra big business. Picture 
pleased generally. — Charles De Paul, 



Dreamland Theatre, Sault Ste. Marie, 
Mich. — General patronage. 

The Adopted Son, with Bushman and 
Bayne. — Fine story. Picture great. Film 
in fair shape. — J. W. Baird, Crystal 
Theatre, Plattonsburg, Mo. 

Kildare of Storm, with Emily Stevens. 
— Like all pictures with this star, not 
worth the express charges. Didn't draw 
or please. — E. R. Prigmore, Idle Hour 
Theatre, Charleston, Miss. — Mixed Pat- 
ronage. 

Eye for Eye, with Nazimova. — Drew 
big and pleased. A fine picture. — J. 
Henkle Henry, Empire Theatre, Win- 
chester, Va. 

The Winning of Beatrice, with May 
Allison. — Fine picture, pleased all. — L. A. 
Hasse, Majestic Theatre, Mausto, Wis. 
— 'Small town patronage. 

Our Mrs. McChesney, with Ethel 
Barrymore. — Above the average. Drew 
good crowds on a two day run. — E. R. 
Prigmore, Idle Hour Theatre, Charles- 
ton, Miss. — Mixed patronage. 

The Great Romance, with Harold 
Lockwood. — Good picture. Fair busi- 
ness. — J. W. Sayre, Strand Theatre, 
Seattle, Wash. — All classes of patronage. 

The Risky Road, with Viola Dana. — 
Dandy Western. Star well liked. Plenty 
of punches. — William Francis, South 
Side Theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — Middle 
class patronage. 

Revenge, with Edith Storey. — Fine 
picture. It seemed to please everybody. 
— L. A. Hasse, Majestic Theatre, Maus- 
ton, Wis. — Small town patronage. 

Paramount 

The Hungry Heart, with Pauline 
Frederick. — Top notch business and it 
pleased. — Ben L. Morris, Olympic Thea- 
tre, Bellaire, O. — General patronage. 

His Own Home Town, with Charles 
Ray. — Very good. He should please 
all. — A. S. Picker, Rex Theatre, Iron- 
wood, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Dub, with Wallace Reid.— Bully. 
Pleasing program picture that will de- 
light and entertain any class of audience 
anywhere any time. — C. A. Krause, Em- 
press Theatre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best 
patronage. 

Uncle Tom's Cabin, with Marguerite 
Clark. — Star draws well, picture draws 
big and with proper music pleases all. — 
A. S. Picker, Rex Theatre, Ironwood, 
Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

In Pursuit of Polly, with Billy Burke. 
— Good comedy drama. Fair crowd well 
satisfied.— W. H. Griffiths, Union Hall 
Theatre, Smithfield, Utah.— Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

The Way of a Man with a Maid, with 
Bryant Washburn. — They liked it. Star 
has power to draw and will do so if 
placed in an appropriate picture. C. A. 
Krause, Empress Theatre, Owensboro, 
Ky. — Best class of patronage. 

The Man From Funeral Range, with 
Wallace Reid. — Very good. Book it. 
Title is against it to some extent. — Will. 
F. Krahn, Lorin Theatre, Berkeley, Cal. 
— Suburban patronage. 

Green Eyes, with Dorothy Dalton. — 
Drawing power very good. Well satis- 
fied.— W. H. Griffith's Union Hall 
Theatre, Smithfield, Utah. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

The Hun Within, with Dorothy Gish. 
— Fine picture. — H. H. Wilson, Sherman 



44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND. MOTOGRAPHY 



IT'S A TOUGH JOB BEING A SERIAL HEROINE 



Margaret Marsh as Anita Carter being set upvii ■>> tour Husky villians in one of the 
episodes in "The Carter Case," the Craig Kennedy serial. (Oliver Films, Inc.) 



Theatre, Sullivan, Ind. — High class pat- 
ronage. 

The Source, with Wallace Reid. — 
Drew well and pleased. A fine picture. — 
J. Henkle Henry, Empire Theatre, Win- 
chester, Va. 

Viviette, with Vivian Martin. — Draw- 
ing power below average. Patrons not 
satisfied. — W. H. Griffith's Union Hall 
Theatre, Smithsfield, Utah. — Mixed pat- 
ronage. 

The Marriage Ring, with Enid Ben- 
nett. — Very good picture. Business fair. 
— F. R. Beitman, Tacoma Theatre, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. — Middle class patronage. 

The Secret Garden, with Lila Lee. — 
They are playing a joke upon us by 
placing this new star in such plays — de- 
cidedly not the kind the public wants to 
see her in. At that this is not a poor 
picture. — C. A. Krause, Empress Thea- 
tre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best class of 
patronage. 

A Nine O'Clock Town, with Charles 
Ray. — This is one of Ray's best. Large 
crowd well pleased. — W. H. Griffith's 
Union Hall Theatre, Smithfield, Utah.— 
Mixed patronage. 

The Man From Funeral Range, with 
Wallace Reid. — Pleased our audience. — 
F. R. Smith, Bijou Theatre, Fond du 
Lac, Wis. — General patronage. 

The Law of the North, with Charles 
Ray. — The picture got the money for 
us on the poorest nights. Book it. — 
Will F. Krahn, Lorin Theatre, Berkeley, 
Cal. — Suburban patronage. 

A Woman of Impulse with Lina Cava- 
lieri. — Cavalieri, Caruso all alikee — no 
pullee — no pleasee. We hope they stay 
in Grand Opera forever. — C. A. Krause, 
Empress Theatre, Owensboro, Ky. — Best 
patronage. 

Viviette, with Vivian Martin. — A good 
picture. — F. R. Smith, Bijou Theatre, 
Fon du Lac, Wis. — General patronage. 

A Woman of Impulse, with Lina Cava- 
lieri. — An excellent production. Her 
best. Business good. — F. G. Heller, 
Starland Theatre, Anderson, Ind. — High 
class patronage. 

A Daughter of Old South, with Paul- 
ine Frederick. — Very good acting and 
drew well here. Pauline Frederick good 
star. — James Palmer, Palace Theatre, 
Hamrnonton, N. J.— Middle class patron- 
age. 

String Beans, with Charles Ray. — This 
is without a doubt one of the best Ray 
has ever made, but business below 
average. — F. R. Smith, Bijou Theatre, 
Fond du Lac, Wis. — General patronage. 

Let's Get a Divorce, with Billie Burke 
— Very good. Star is pleasing and story 
is very good. Clay H. Powers, Strand 
Theatre, Dunsmulir, Cal. — General pa- 
tronage. 

Less Than Kin, with Wallace Reid — 
This is a feature that mill please all 
classes. — G. A. Duncan, Lyric Theatre. 
Carlisle, Ky. — Good patronage. 

The Cook of Canyon Camp, with 
George Beban — Enjoyed by all. Fine 
picture. Draws well. — J. T. Marshall, 
Colonial Theatre, Big Rapids, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

Huck and Tom, with Jack Pickford — 
Good kid picture. — Clay H. Powers, 
Strand Theatre, Dunsmiur, Cal. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

The Woman God Forgot, with Geral- 
dine Farrar. — Fine picture. Anyone who 



will find fault with a picture like this 
should move forward a couple of rows 
and have another look. Very good busi- 
ness. — W. J. Kerr, Star theatre. South- 
port, Pa. — Small town patronage. 

The Law of the North, with Charles 
Ray — Although the part taken by Ray 
in this production would have been more 
adaptable to W. S. Hart, it gave good 
satisfaction and brought us a splendid 
business. F. R. Matson, Crystal Thea- 
tlre, Flandreau, S. D. — General patron- 
age. 

Jack and Jill, with Jack Pickford— A 
high class comedy drama. Pleased 
everyone. — W. A. Forsyth, Temple 
Theatre, Standish, Mich. — Small town 
patronage. 

Pathe 

A Little Pirate, with Baby Marie Os- 
borne. — Greatest kid picture ever played. 
Played up kids and cleaned up. — A. S. 
Picker, Rex Theatre, Ironwood, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The Terror of the Range, with George 
Larkin. — Most excellent. Full of pep. 
Draws well. — J. S. Welsh, Star Theatre. 
Shreveport, La. 

When a Man Rides Alone (American), 
with William Russell. — Although this is 
not his best, he surely draws people no 
matter what the weather may be. He 
is a big drawing card here. — Mrs. J. A. 
Dostal, Ideal Theatre, Omaha, Neb. — 
Neighborhood patronage. 

Hoobs in a Hurry, (American), with 
William Russell. — A dandy picture. 
Liked by all, and a big house. — E. Saun- 
ders, Saunders Palace Theatre, Harvard, 
111. 

Money Isn't Everything, (American) 
with Mary Miles Minter. — A very good 
picture. Two days to fair business. — E. 
R. Prigmore. Idle Hour Theatre, Charles- 
ton, Miss. — Mixed patronage. 

Infatuation, with Gaby Deslys. — Got 
over for one day. Fair program feature. 



— W. H. Mart, Strand Theatre, Grinnell, 
la. — College town. 

Wives and Other Wives, (American), 
with Mary Miles Minter. — This star 
always goes good with us. This picture 
brought us good patronage and pleased. 
— House & Justice, Grand Theatre, 
Marion, N. C. — Small town patronage. 

The Amazing Imposter (American), 
with Mary Miles Minter. — Good story, 
fine business, capacity. — C. J. Wood- 
mance, American Theatre, New Ulm, 
Minn. — General patronage. 

Rosemary Climbs the Heights, (Amer- 
ican), with Mary Miles Minter. — Poor 
picture. Played to fair business. — E. R. 
Prigmore, Idle Hour Theatre, Charles- 
ton, Miss. — Mixed patronage. 

Money Isn't Everything (American), 
with Margarita Fisher. — Good comedy 
drama to good patronage well pleased. 
House & Justice, Grand Theatre, Marion, 
N. C. Small town patronage. 

Where the West Begins (American), 
with William Russell. — Good Saturday 
or Sunday. Good picture. Did not draw 
well through week. — Fred Bosman, 
Electric Theatre, St. Joseph, Mo. — Mix- 
ed patronage. 

The Mantle of Charity (American), 
with Margarita Fisher. — Not a very good 
Fisher picture. — C. J. Woodmance, 
Liberty Theatre, New Ulm, Minn. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

Three X Gordon (Plodkinson), with 
J. Warren Kerrigan. — Picture very good. 
Kerrigan big favorite. — F. R. Beitman, 
Tacoma Theatre, Indianapolis, Ind. — 
Middle class patronage. 

Select 

A Pair of Silk Stockings, with Con- 
stance Talmadge. — Pleasing picture, 
satisfied audience. Good business. — F. 
R. Beitman, Tacoma Theatre, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. — Middle class patronage. 

The Silent Master, with Robert War- 



45 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



'v'rk. — Mvsterv. Well made. Comments 



Triangle 



stance Talmadge — Another peacn 01 a 
comedy drama, so finely produced by 
Select. — A. S. Widaman, Centennial 
Theatre, Warsaw, Ind. 

Pa.nth.ea, with Norma Talmadge — A 
real picture. Don't usually do much 
business on this class of picture, but I 
did on .this and everybody liked it. — 
E. L. Franck, Oasis Theatre, Ajo, Ariz. 
— Border mining town. 

Her Better Half, with Alice Brady — 
Alice Brady does not seem to put them 
over. — A. S. Picker, Rex Theatre, Iron- 
wpod, Mich. — -Mixed patronage. 

Her Only Way, with Norma Tal- 
madge — A 1 production. Good star 
cast and story. Good business. — W. H. 
Mart, Strand Theatre, Grinnell, la. — Col- 
lege town. 

The Savage Woman, with Clara Kim- 
ball Young — Nothing extra, but drew 
good house. — C. J. Woodmance, Ameri- 
can Theatre. New Ulm, Minn. — General 
patronage. 

At the Mercy of Men, with Alice Brady 
—Pleased at least 1 per cent. Not a pic- 
ture for children or a mixed crowd. — 
E. R. Prigmore, Idle Hour Theatre. 
Charleston, Miss. — Mixed patronage. 

In the Hollow of Her Hand, with 
Alice Brady — Very good picture. Busi- 
ness good. — F. G. Heller, Starland Thea- 
tre, Anderson, Ind. — High class patron- 
age. 

The Honeymoon, with Constance Tal- 
madge — The picture took well as the 
star is very well liked here. — F. R. Beit- 
man, Tacoma Theatre, Indianapolis, Ind. 
— Middle class patronage. 

The Burden of Proof, with Marion 
Davies — -Some frost. Worst picture we 
have run in months. — C. J. Woodmance, 
American Theatre, New Ulm, Minn. — 
General patronage. 

The Cavell Case, with Julia Arthur- 
Patrons saifl it was great. It holds you 
to the finish. A war play not out of 
date. — William Francis, South Side 
Theatre. Greensburg, Ind. — Middle class 
patronage. 




BEATRIZ MICHELENA 
Starring in her own production, "Just 
Squaw." 



business on a week night. — E. R. Prig- 
more, Ide Hour Theatre, Charleston, 
Miss. — Mixed patronage. 

The Silent Rider, with Roy Stewart — 
Fair Western. Slow at first, but action 
toward the end. Stewart goes good with 
us. — House & Justice, Grand Theatre, 
Marion, Ind. — Small town patronage. 

The Child of M'sieu, with Baby Marie 
Osborne — Just an average picture. 
Pleased the kids and played to good 
business. — E. R. Prigmore, Idle Hour 
Theatre, Charleston, Miss. — Mixed pa- 
tronage. 

Unto the End, with Crane Wilbur — 
Wilbur well liked. Good picture. E. 
Cameron, Como Theatre, St. Paul, Minn. 

Middle class patronage. 

Ashes of Hope, with Belle Bennett — 
Good picture with plenty of action. — L. 

46 



A. Hasse, Majestic Theatre, Mauston, 
Wis. — Small town patronage. 

A Red-Haired Cupid, with Roy Stew- 
art — Good picture. Drew as well as any 
program picture does here. — Mrs. J. M. 
Gardner, Arc Theatre, Delphi, Ind. — 
Small town patronage. 

United 

The Light of Western Stars, with 
Dustin Farnum — Fine production. Won- 
derful scenes. Business excellent. — C. J. 
Woodmance, American Theatre, New 
Ulm, Minn. — General patronage. 

The Light of Western Stars, with 
Dustin Farnum — If you do not show this 
picture you are denying all classes of 
your audience a treat. — E. Saunders, 
Saunders Palace Theatre, Harvard, 111. 

The Light of Western Stars, with 
Dustin Farnum — Very good, and did an 
exceptional business on a three-day run. 
— F. R. Smith, Bijou Theatre, Fond du 
Lac, Wis. — General patronage. 

The Light or Western Stars, with 
Dustin Farnum — Picture fine. Every- 
body liked it. ' Star very good. — J. T. 
Snushall, Colonial Theatre, Big Rapids, 
Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Light of Western Stars, with 
Dustin Farnum — Played this against 
"Mickey" and "The Shepherd of the 
Hills," and did a holdout business for 
two nights. — Ralph W. Crocker, Star 
Theatre, Elgin, 111.- — General patronage. 

Universal 

Hell Bent, with Harry Carey — Nothing 
to rave about, but will go. — C. E. Waug- 
hop, Scenic Theatre, Detroit, Minn. — 
Small town patronage. 

Three Mounted Men, with Harry Carey 
— Some picture. Star climbing and sure 
pleasing. — A. Hammerly, Lyric Theatre, 
Hamilton, O. — Mixed patronage. 

Kiss or Kill, with Priscilla Dean — Good 
picture. Dean ordinary. Rawlinson car- 
ried the picture. — W. H. Mart, Strand 
Theatre, Grinnell, la. — College town. 

Roped, with Harry Carey — Capacity 
business — J. W. Sayre, Misson Theatre, 
Seattle, Wash. — General patronage. 

The Wild Cat of Paris, with Priscilla 
Dean — -This title gets them and after 
you have them they are satisfied. — F. G. 
Heller, Starland Theatre, Anderson, Ind. 
— High class patronage. 

Smashing Through, with Herbert Raw- 
linson — New star to us, but production 
was well liked. Action all the time. — 
R. L. Hensler, Bijou Theatre, Carrollton, 
111. 

Roped, with Harry Carey — Book this. 
It's good. I can't get enough of this 
kind. — A. Hammerly, Lyric Theatre, 
Hamilton, O. — Mixed patronage. 

The Wild Cat of Paris, with Priscilla 
Dean — Lots of action and should go any- 
where. — C. E. Waughop, Scenic Theatre, 
Detroit, Minn. — Small town patronage. 

Vitagraph 

A Diplomatic Mission, with F.arle Wil- 
liams — Star does not draw. Bad title. 
Production fair program feature. — A. S. 
Picker. Rex Theatre, Ironwood, Mich. — 
Mixed patronage. 

The Dawn of Understanding, with 
Bessie Love — Poor. Poor. ' No draw- 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



ing card. Vitagrapli getting out some 
poor stuff. — C. J. Woodmance, Liberty 
Theatre, New Ulm, Minn. — General pa- 
tronage. 

The Girl in His House, with Earle 
Williams — Fair program offering. — 
Charles De Paul, Dreamland Theatre, 
Sault St. Marie, Mich. — General patron- 
age. 

Love Watches, with Corinne Griffith — 
If they will stand for this they will stand 
anything. — W. H. Mart, Strand Theatre, 
Grinnell, Iowa. — College town. 

The Lion and the Mouse, with Alice 
Joyce — Failed to attract, although it sat- 
isfied at advanced prices. Don't promise 
too much in your advertising. We raved 
about it because of the flowers it re- 
ceived at the hands of the review sharps. 
Wish we had been more modest. — C. A. 
Krause, Empress Theatre, Owensboro, 
Ky. — Best patronage. 

The King of Diamonds, with Harrj 
Morey — Good picture. Drew good house. 
Star well liked. — C. J. Woodmance, 
American Theatre, New Ulm, Minn. — 
General patronage. 

The Man Who Wouldn't Tell, with 
Earle Williams — Business heavy. — Col- 
iseum Theatre, Seattle, Wash. — General 
patronage. 

One Thousand Dollars, with Edward 
Earle — Pleasing picture. — John Scharn- 
berg, American Theatre, Davenport, la. 
Middle class patronage. 

The Triumph of the Weak, with Alice 
Joyce — Strong story, with good acting. 
Everyone pleased. — H. G. Thorpe, New 
Grand Theatre, Crosby, Minn. — Mining- 
town. 

World 

The Beloved Blackmailer, with Carlyle 
Blackwell — Drew well. World pictures 
are good. — E. Cameron, Como Theatre, 
St. Paul, Minn. — Middle class patronage. 

The Rough Neck, with Montagu Love 
— One of the best pictures we have ever 
run. Better than some of the so-called 
specials. Sure drew good for us. — W. 
F. Carson, Violet Theatre, Milwaukee, 
Wis. — Middle class patronage. 

The Man of Bronze, with Lewis Stone 
— Not enough rough stuff for a Western. 
Star slow. Plot and photography good. 
— William Francis, South Side Theatre, 
Greensburg, Ind. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

A Soul Without Windows, with Ethel 
Clayton — Good picture. — E. Cameron, 
Como Theatre, St. Paul, Minn— Middle 
class patronage. 

Inside the Lines, with Frank Stone — 
Fair picture. Star very clever. Usual 
Saturday capacity business. — A D. 
Stanchfield, Rae Theatre, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Grouch, with Montagu Love. — 
Photography, plot and stars good. Co- 
star Dorothy Green made a hit. A hint 
to World. — William Francis, South Side 
Theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — Middle class 
patronage. 

T'Other Dear Charmer, with Louise 
TTuff — Beautiful picture. Drew well. — E. 
Cameron, Como Theatre, St. Paul, Minn. 
— Middle class patronage. 

Love in a Hurry, with Carlyle Black- 
well — Fair program picture. — C. E. 
Waughop, Scenic Theatre, Detroit, Minn. 
— Small town patronage. 



Specials and State Rights 

The Bargain (W. H. Productions), 
with William S. Hart — The best Hart we 
have run out of about fifteen. — Loeffel- 
holz Bros., Auditorium Theatre, Cuba 
City, Wis. — Middle class patronage. 

Civilization, (Thomas H. Ince Produc- 
tion) — This was undoubtedly a big pic- 
ture four years ago. Showed at 50c top 
and reserved seats, but production did 
not live up to its billing. — R. L. Hensler, 
Bijou Theatre, Carrollton, 111. 

Those Who Pay, (Thomas H. Ince 
Production), with Bessie Barriscale — 
really good picture and a true moral.— 
A. S. Widaman, Centennial Theatre, 
Warsaw, Ind. 

The Million Dollar Mystery (Arrow) 
Very disappointing. Gets money, but au- 
dience very disappointed. — A. S. Picker, 
Rex Theatre, Ironwood, Mich. — Mixed 
patronage. 

Intolerance, (Griffith Production) — 
Picture still in good shape. Did only 
fair. — John Scharnberg, American Thea- 
tre, Davenport, la. — Middle class patron- 
age. 

The Public Defender (Harry Raver), 
with Frank Keenan — Good picture. Busi- 
ness excellent. — E. Cameron, Como 
Theatre, St. Paul, Minn. — Middle class 
patronage. 

Serials 

The Iron Test, with Antonio Moreno, 
(Vitagraph) — Second episode was good 
Held up interest. — Lewis W. Brisco, 
Princess Elwood Theatre, Elwood, Ind. 
— General patronage. 

The Lightning Raiders, with Pearl 
White, (Pathe.) — Every episode equal to 
a big special at the box office. Book it. 
— Regent Theatre, Cleveland, Miss. — 
General patronage. 

The Lure of the Circus, with Eddie 
Polo, (Universal.) — One of the best 
serials. Plenty of action. — A Hammerly, 
Lyric Theatre, Hamilton, O. — Mixed pa- 
tronage. 

The Man of Might, with William Dun- 
can (Vitagraph.) — Best picture Duncan 
has played. Good picture from box of- 
fice standpoint. — L. Prosser, Star Thea- 
tre, Des Moines, la. — Downtown patron- 
age. 

A Fight for Millions, with William 
Duncan (Vitagraph) — Tenth chapter and 
going strong. Vitagraph serials are all 
good patronage makers for us. — House 
& Justice, Grand Theatre, Marion, N. C. 
— Small town patronage. 

The Lightning Raider, with Pearl 
White (Pathe.) — Pearl draws the crowd. 
Great with this serial — E. Cameron, 
Como Theatre, St. Paul, Minn. — Middle 
class patronage' 

A Fight for Millions, with William 
Duncan (Vitagraphl — This got a poor 
start but has picked up. Am well satis- 
fied with business on it, although it does 
not seem to appeal to women. — A. C. 
Klug, Empress • Theatre, Zumbrota, 
Minn. — Rural patronage. 

Hands Up, with Ruth Roland (Pathe) 
— Played last episode to capacity. Splen- 
did Western serial that got us money. — 
A. D. Stanchfield, Rae Theatre, Vnn 
Arbor, Mich. — Mixed patronage. 

The Fight for Millions, with William 
Duncan (Vitagraph) — It gets the money. 
Nuf ced. — S. C. Vale, Dennison, O. — 
General patronage. 



What Is the Picture's 

Box Office Value? 



Is the film you are running in your 
theatre a money maker? Pass the 
word on ! Does the picture draw the 
crowds? Tell the exhibitors in the 
other states. They want to book the 
same pictures. Tell them in Exhibi- 
tors Herald and Motography's 
"What the Picture Did for Me" 
department. 

Your box office is the test of 
popularity. Fill in the blank NOW 
and send to Exhibitors Herald and 
Motography, 417 South Dearborn 
street, Chicago. 

Title 

Star 

Producer 

Weather 

How Advertised 

Competition 

Admission Prices 

Remarks 



Name of Theatre 

Transient or Neighborhood Patron- 
age 

Title 

Star 

Producer 

Weather 

How Advertised 

Competition 

Admission Prices 

Remarks 



/ 

City and State 

Sent in by 



47 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Cleveland Exhibitor's 
Strong Box Too Strong 

For Pair of Burglars 

CLEVELAND, OHIO.— Burglars who 
broke into the Norwood Theatre, Cleve- 
land, and stole the strong box containing 
$250 and some liberty bonds, had such 
a hard time opening the box that they 
gave it up and tossed the valuable iron 
container in an alley. The owner, Paul 
Gusdanovic, recovered it the following 
day. Only recently the Strand Theatre, 
Cleveland, another house owned by Mr. 
Gusdanovic, was robbed, the cashier 
having been held up during the busy 
supper hour, and Paul is beginning to 
think they are picking on him. 



Tom Colby, former salesman for the 
Universal, out of Cleveland, is one of the 
few Cleveland film boys still in France, 
and he expects to remain there for some 
time. Mr. Colby has written Manager 
Smith of the Universal that he is with 
the A. E. F. Co. B, 6th Am. Train and 
from the way the troops were being 
moved at the place where he was sta- 
tioned, he expected to be away for a 
year. 



Abe Levy, well-known showman, of 
Bellefontaine, Ohio, has bought the 
Garden Theatre, Pensacola, Florida, and 
has moved to the sunny south. The 
Garden is a fine new house, seating 900, 
and was built by Cleveland interests. 
The deal was negotiated by D. N. Grill, 
Cleveland broker. Mr. Levy formerly 
owned the Opera House in Bellefontaine. 



The Family Theatre, Cleveland, has 
been purchased by C. J. Vanderwerf, 
old-time exhibitor. Mr. Vanderwerf re- 
cently disposed of the Paris Theatre, on 
the west side of Cleveland. 



Nat Fleisher, one of Ed Smith's light- 
ning salesmen for Universal films in 
Northern Ohio, captured three prizes for 
business latelv. His 12-cylinder Ford 
and beautiful lingo certainly are a great 
help. 

The new Euclid Theatre, in downtown 
Cleveland, which opens the fore part of 
April, will have one of the finest projec- 
tion booths in the country. 



Thieves Get Nothing 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO — Sneak 
thieves who hid in the theatre during 
the evening performance broke into the 
office of the Strand theatre but secured 
nothing. Two keys and a pair of pliers 
were left behind by the intruders. 



Shows to Draw Trade 

OWOSSO, MICH.— To attract trade 
to this citv. merchants are planning to 
rent a building as a community house and 
give free motion picture shows every 
Saturday night. 



Picture Men Organize 

ATLANTA, GA.— An organization 
which will include exchange men and ex- 
hibitors is to be formed here to make 
possible closer relations. Trade prob- 
lems will be discussed from time to time. 



"Khavah" Is 'Completed ; 
Zion Company Planning 
Two More Big Features 

"Khavah," the initial Sholom Aleichem 
production by the Zion Films, Inc., co- 
starring Alice Hastings and Giacomo 
Masuroff, will be finished this week. 
Work on the exteriors is being rushed 
by Director Charles E. Davenport be- 
cause of the demands from exhibitors 
for an early showing. According to 
present plans the picture will have a pri- 
vate showing at one of the Broadway 
theatres by April 15. 

The story is working out well, and 
the prediction is held out by those who 
have seen the picture in the making that 
it will prove a sensation in the world of 
the silent drama. It is expected to prove 
a relief from some of the sex and tri- 
angle stories that have glutted the mar- 
ket for the last few years. 

The plans of the Zion Films, Inc., now 
include a trip to Palestine this summer, 
where a massive production will be 
staged. Prior to this, however, it is ex- 
pected that a feature play by David 
Pinski, the Jewish dramatist, will be pro- 
duced. 



Gets Trenton Contract 

Charles C. Hildengler and a company 
of which he is the head have awarded a 
contract for the erection of a theater on 
east State street in Trenton, N. J., which, 
it is stated, will have a seating capacity 
of 1,400. 



Adopts Bonus System 

The Famous Players-Lasky Corpora- 
tion has inaugurated a weekly bonus 
plan for its sales force in all the branch 
exchanges, effective March lf>. 




KLSIK FKIUiUSOIV 
In an artistic potto from the Artcrnft pic- 
ture, "Kyt-M of the Soul." 



Kin Hubbard Writing 
Humorous Sayings for 
New Screen Magazine 

Kin Hubbard, Hoosier wit and phil- 
osopher, who has becorfie known to mil- 
lions of Americans because of his daily 
Abe Martin stories in scores of news- 
papers, and who recently signed a con- 
tract to supply the New Screen Maga- 
zine being published by Universal, with 
witty paragraphs, has coined numerous 
of the sayings , that have been used by 
the American public for laughing pur- 
poses, without knowledge of where the 
puns originated. 

Mr. Hubbard recently coined the defi- 
nition of a "cootie" and told of its dif- 
ference from the common louse, be- 
cause of its military training. Others 
of his witty Abe Martin sayings re- 
cently "released" are: 

"All is not gold that glitters, and some 
red noses are caused by indigestion." 

"Some girls were born with big feet 
an'others v/ear white shoes." 

"Ther' ain't nothin' so hard as an easy 
payment." 

"Some girls look good in anything and 
some in hardly anything." 

"Every time the world gets better 
somebody designs a skirt to spoil it." 

"The only time a woman tells her right 
age is when she starts to school." 

"Joe Lark, who used to publish a news- 
paper that pleased everybody, is in the 
poor farm." 

"The trouble with a flat is that you 
can't cross your legs without kickin' 
your wife." 

Houdini's Close Call 

"In Master Mystery" 

How dangerous to himself are the 
feats of self liberation performed by 
Houdini, the handcuff king, may be 
judged by those who see the ninth 
episode of "The Master Mystery" pro- 
duced by B. A. Rolfe for Octagon Films, 
Inc. 

In this episode Houdini is bound by 
the emissaries of his enemy, the Auto- 
maton, and placed in an elevator shaft 
under a descending freight elevator. To 
escape being crushed, Houdini is com- 
pelled to free himself and get out of the 
shaft. He accomplishes the feat, but his 
escape is so narrow that the ropes with 
which he is bound are caught between 
the elevator cage and the floor. 

•Houdini has had many close calls in 
his career, but this he regards as one of 
his closest. 



Another Kelly Story 

"A House Divided," J. Stuart Black- 
ton's next feature, is the third consecu- 
tive Blackton feature produced from an 
Anthony Paul Kelly script. It was 
adapted by Mr. Kelly from the novel, 
"The Substance of His House," by Ruth 
Holt Boucicault. 



New Agency Pays 

The agency which the Nicholas Power 
Company has established in Buenos 
Aires, Argentine, through Morse & Co. 
has been amply justified, it is reported, 
as many orders are coming in for Pow- 
er's cameragraphs from that territory. 



48 



C^N^DWNW'FILM NEWS 



Canadian Exhibitors Seek Relief 

From Fifteen Cents a Reel Tax 

Send Secretary Scott to Ottawa to Intercede in 
Their Behalf — Many Being Forced to Wall 



Ottawa the Canadian capital, became 
the center of firm interest in the Domin- 
ion on March 19, when Thos. Scott, of 
Toronto, invaded the Parliamentary pre- 
serves as official representative of the 
Motion Picture Exhibitors' Protective 
Association, of Ontario. 

Mr. Scott, who is secretary of the 
Ontario association, was seeking relief 
from the Federal tax of 15 cents per reel 
per day, which, he declared, was forcing 
a number of small exhibitors through- 
out the country to the wall. If he could 
not have the tax abolished entirely, he 
wanted consideration for the little ex- 
hibitor, but everybody in the film busi- 
ness was being taxed half a dozen dif- 
ferent ways by every government that 
had the right to impose an assessment. 
He pointed out that the moving picture 
business was being taxed proportionately 
and comparatively 25 per cent more than 
its share. 

Expenses Have Increased 

In his statement of claims, Secretary 
Scott noted that the expenses of operat- 
ing a moving picture theatre in Canada 



Harry Pomeroy Pulls 

Neat Business Getter 

Manager Harry Pomeroy of the Hol- 
man Theatre, Montreal, pulled off a neat 
stroke of business during the week of 
March 17, when he presented "Tempered 
Steel," starring Olga Petrova, simul- 
taneously with the appearance of the 
noted screen star in a feature vaudeville 
act at the Princess Theatre, Montreal. 
Pomeroy ran half-tone portraits of 
Madame Petrova in the newspapers as 
advertisements for his attraction, and 
the result was that he played to capacity 
business all week. 



Two Managers Change 

Two resignations of moving picture 
theatre managers were recorded in Ot- 
tawa, Ont, during the week of March 
17. On that date, Manager J. T. Moxley 
of Allen's Regent Theatre announced 
that he had acquired the lease of the 
Russell Theatre, a legitimate house, 
which he proposed to convert into a 
moving picture theatre after improve- 
ments had been made. His association, 
with the Allen Theatrical Enterprises, 
was due to expire on March 26. The 
Regent, at Ottawa, is one of the best 
paying theatres controlled by the Allen 
interests. 

Manager J. Lavoie of the National 
Theatre, Ottawa, also terminated his 
connection with the National on Satur- 
day, March 22. He stated that he ex- 
pected to secure the management of an 
important theatre in Montreal. 



had increased 300 per cent during the 
war period. The theatres were also 
hard hit by the influenza epidemic. 

In conclusion Mr. Scott stated: "The 
Motion Picture screen has proved the 
greatest asset to the Allies for the serv- 
'ice rendered during the war in securing 
recruits, helping national loan cam- 
paigns, conservation of fuel, Union Gov- 
ernment elections, patriotic funds, Red 
Cross fund, the War Lecture Bureau and 
a.number of benevolent institutions. We 
deserve consideration at the hands of 
the government." 

Exhibitors Have Affiliated 

Mr. Scott announced that if he could 
not secure consideration on his repre- 
sentation alone, a large deputation repre- 
senting the exhibitors of all provinces in 
Canada would wait upon the Canadian 
Federal government to request relief. 

He also announced that the Ontario 
Association, which he represented, had 
just affiliated with the Motion Picture 
Exhibitors' Associations of Quebec and 
the Maritime Provinces, these organiza- 
tions covering the whole of Eastern 
Canada. 



New Organist at Rex 

Professor Metcalfe, who presided at 
the concert organ in the Dominion Thea- 
tre, one of Winnipeg's largest film 
houses, has become organist of the Rex 
Theatre, Vancover, B. C, after having 
been a theatre organist in Brooklyn, N. 
Y.. since last summer. 




Julia Arthur Appears 

In Ontario Centres 

Julia Arthur, the celebrated Canadian 
actress, has arranged to make a personal 
appearance at a number of moving pic- 
ture theatres in Eastern Canada in con- 
nection with the presentation of the fea- 
ture, "The Cavell Case," in which she 
played the leading role. 

Miss Arthur, who is a native of Hamil- 
ton, Ont., was scheduled to appear at 
the Allen Theatre, Toronto, on Monday, 
March 24; at the New Grand Theatre, 
Montreal, on the previous day, Sunday, 
March 23, and at Ottawa and Hamilton, 
Ontario, later in the week. Her book- 
ings may also take her to other Ontario 
centres. 



A $450,000 Theatre 

A charter for a company with a capi- 
talization of $450,000 has been granted 
by the Ontario Provincial Government 
to the Waverley Theatre Corporation, 
Limited, Toronto, which is to build a 
large new suburban theatre in the Kew 
Beach district of Toronto. The men as- 
sociated with the new company already 
have a small theatre in this district, and 
this will be replaced by a much larger 
house, it has been announced. Accord- 
ing to the plans, it will seat 1,500 

Changes Theatre Name 

Paramount Theatres, Limited, To- 
ronto, which owns quite a string of 
moving picture theatres in Eastern 
Canada, as a subsidiary of Regal Films, 
Limited, has decided to change the name 
of the St. Julian Theatre, Bloor street, 
Toronto, to the King George Theatre. 
The company also owned the Prince 
George Theatre, on Bloor street, but this 
house has been replaced by a new and 
large theatre known as the Alhambra. 

Edmonton Attractions 

Kdmonton, Alberta, moving picture 
theatres presented three special attrac- 
tions during the first half of the week 
of March 17, two of which were British- 
made specials. "The Better 'Ole" was 
the feature at the Empire Theatre, while 
"Kiddies in the Ruins" was shown at the 
new Allen Theatre. The third special 
was "Virtuous Wives," at the Empress 
Theatre. 



100 Per Cent Membership 

Hamilton. Ont., boasts of a 100 per 
cent membership in the Motion Picture 
Exhibitors' Protective Association of 
Ontario. There are seventeen moving 
picture theatres in Hamilton, and the as- 
sociation's active membership in the city 
is seventeen. 



PAULINE FREDERICK 
Whose second product Ion for Goldnrn In 
entitled "One Week of Mfe." 



Comedies for England 

"Smiling Bill" Parsons and his 
Capitol Comedies are about to invade 
the European field. The distributing 
rights for England to these inimitable 
Capitol Comedies have just been pur- 
chased from Goldwyn Distributing Cor- 
poration by George King, general man- 
ager of the Stoll Film Co. 



49 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Universal's Scenario 

Department Corrects 
Error Regarding Film 

In announcing the purchase of a 
story entitled "La Femme et La Pan- 
tin," for a future vehicle for Priscilla 
Dean, recently the Universal scenario de- 
partment erroneously announced that 
the screen version was to be an adapta- 
tion of the famous French play by Pierre 
Louys. The film story will not be an 
adaptation of the play, but will be put 
into scenario form, adapted from the 
novel, direct. "La Femme et La Pan- 
tin" has, like the famous Bizet opera 
"Carmen," a Spanish setting, and it has 
been obtained for Miss Dean, due to 
the fact that it is especially suitable to 
the talents of the star of "The Wildcat 
of Paris," "The Wicked Darling," "Rag- 
gedy Ann," "The Silk Lined Burglar" 
and other recent Universal Special At- 
tractions. 

It is expected that "La Femme et La 
Pantin," under the tentative title of "The 
Woman and the Puppet," will be pro- 
duced following the completion of a 
Bayard Veiller story, which will serve 
as Miss Dean's next vehicle. 



New Bessie Love Film 

Bessie Love in the first part of "A 
Yankee Princess," has forsaken the win- 
some, wistful, mischievious little sprit 
that is so much a part of her personality, 
and has become a regular backyard holli- 
gan, the fear and terror of a neighbor- 
hood known as Flannigan's Flats. 



Mary Miles Minter Is 

Dancer in New Picture 

Production of a new Mary Miles Min- 
ter feature, tentatively titled, "Yvonne 
from Paris," was started this week at 
the American's Santa Barbara studios 
under the direction of Emmett J. Flynn. 
Prepared for the screen by Frank How- 
ard Clark from an original story by 
Joseph Franklin Poland, it is said to be 
one of the most unusual vehicles Miss 
Minter has ever had. The story relates 
the adventures of a little Parisian dancer 
who comes to America and learns that 
the highways to success is not strewn 
with primroses. Miss Minter has been 
surrounded with a cast of well-estab- 
lished players, including Alan Forrest, J. 
Barney Sherry, Vera Lewis, Rosemary 
Theby, Bert Grassby and F. E. Warren. 



Theatres in Eugene to 

Operate Without License 

EUGEXE, ORE. — Motion pictures will 
hereafter be allowed to operate in Eu- 
gene without license, according to ac- 
tion taken by the city council. The ques- 
tion of eliminating the license on this 
class of business in cases where a thea- 
tre is permanently located, was brought 
up at a previous meeting of the council 
and referred to the judiciary commit- 
tee. This committee reported that it 
was deemed advisable to remove the 
license and the council adopted the re- 
port. The license on traveling theatrical 
trouper, will be retained. 



Name Ancillary Receiver 
For Bankrupt Corporation 

NEWARK, N. J. — To assure proper 
possession of films at Fort Lee and 
Grantwood. said to be the property of 
the Ivy Picture Corporation of 52 Broad- 
way, New York, which concern is in 
bankruptcy court in New York, Judge 
Haight in the United States District 
Court here, appointed Robert Wood of 
New York ancillary receiver of the con- 
cern for New Jersey. Mr. Wood is the 
New York receiver. 

The Ivy Picture Corporation is said 
to be the producer of the picture known 
as "The Lure of Lady Liberty." 



Chinks Like the Drews 

That the popular comedians. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sidney Drew are great favorites in 
China is shown by a recent article in 
"The Revue," published at Shaghai. 
Under the caption "A Welcome Return." 
the Chinese cinema critic writes enthu- 
siastically about the return of the Drews 
to the screen and their entering into a 
contract with President Amedee J. Van 
Beuren of the V. B. K. Film Corpora- 
tion for the production of two-reelers. 



Arrow Acquires Feature 

The Arrow Film Corporation has ac- 
quired the world rights to the Otis B. 
Thayer production, "Miss Arizona," star- 
ring Gertrude Bondhill and James 
O'Xeil. The story was written by 
George Elliott, Jr. It was produced in 
the Garden of the Gods, near Denver. 



What Would You Do? 

with your sweetheart in another's arms — 
Startling story telling all! 



A Quality Production 

FEATURING 

ALMA HANLON and JACK SHERRILL 

IN 

"The Profiteer" 

Is the woman justified in killing him who assails her honor ? 

- WRITE, 'PHONE, WIRE r 

SILEE FILM EXCHANGE 

Consumers Building phone Harrison 3742 Chicago, Illinois 



50 




CHICAGO TRADE EVENTS 




Chicago Exchange 
Men Aid in Fight 
On Wisconsin Bill 
Assist Exhibitors to Organize 
Against Censorship Law 

Introduction of a censorship bill in 
the Wisconsin legislature has added ad- 
ditional worry to Chicago exchangemen, 
who for several weeks have been deeply 
concerned over the Buck censorship bill 
now pending before the Illinois senate. 

If both- bills pass, the distributors here 
will be hit hard, as practically all of the 
local offices serve both Illinois and Wis- 
consin. 

Tarbell Delivers Ultimatum 

E. F. Tarbell, manager of the Chicago 
office of Vitagraph, and representative 
of the National Motion Picture Associa- 
tion, hurried to Milwaukee a few days 
ago to attend a meeting of the state 
motion picture managers. 

He served warning that if the Oakes 
censorship bill is passed, no more films 
will be snipped into Wisconsin. 

Managers of other exchanges have 
made trips to Milwaukee and other Wis- 
consin cities assisting exhibitors in or- 
ganizing their fight on the measure. 

It is probable that extensive co-opera- 
tion will be given the Wisconsin 'exhibi- 
tors and exchange men from Chicago. 

Exhibitors Are Active 

Wisconsin exhibitors are making an 
issue of the fact that state censorship 
will draw motion pictures into politics. 
Appleton managers, including Neil 
Duffy, Joseph Wininger and A. M. Beg- 
linger, have already interested the citi- 
zens of their city in the dangers of the 
bills, and other cities are being organ- 
ized. 



"Mickey'' Bookings 

Close for Chicago 

F. O. Nielsen, general manager for 
the Mickey Film corporation, announces 
that his company is to close its books 
April 30 for any further bookings on the 
phenomenal feature, "Michey," starring 
Mabel Normand, for Chicago dates. 

This untold condition is brought about 
through the splendid success this film 
is enjoying throughout the state, as 
evidenced by the heavy return dates the 
Illinois exhibitors are establishing. 

Thomas P. Noonan of the Palace 
theater, Danville; C. E. Irving of the 
Irving theater, Bloomington; Charles 
Lamb of the Palm theater, Rockford; 
also Johnson Bros, of the Royal, same 
city and William Burford of the Fox 
theater, with M. A. Rubens playing his 
two Jbliet theaters, the Lincoln and 
Princess. They are all playing return 
engagements with two-day runs and in 
some cases longer. 



Hundreds Dance at 
Popular Film Man's 
Reception Mar. 18 

Madison Square Hall, adjoining the 
Madison Square Theatre, at Cicero and 
Madison streets, was the scene of a very 
pretty and delightful dancing party and 
reception tendered to Fred H. McMillan 
on the evening of March 18. 

The committee in charge of the affair: 
William Heaney, of the Madison Square 
and Crawford theatres; F. J. Flaherty, 
manager of the Independent Sales Com- 
pany; Charles Sedell of the United Pic- 
ture Theatres of America, and Morrie 
Salkin, Pathe salesman, arranged a most 
enjoyable program of dances, which was 
rendered by a selected orchestra, and 
with the novel decorative idea prevail- 
ing, the hundred or more couples in at- 
tendance presented one of the prettiest 
of local film affairs seen in some time. 
There was present representatives from 
every exchange in the city. 

Fred H. McMillan, who perhaps is 
more faTniliarly known to the trade 
throughout the Central West as "Little 
Mc," was a busy and smiling host greet- 
ing his numerous friends with the same 
old-time fervor and genial jests. Mr. 
McMillan wishes to .thank his many 
friends who so splendidly supported this 
worthy affair and contributed to its suc- 
cess. 



Harry Grossman Meets 

Mid-West Exhibitors 

Harry Grossman, vice-president and 
general manager of Oliver Films, Inc., 
is in Chicago this week, where he is 
meeting by appointment the prominent 
exchange men of the west to give pri- 
vate showings of the initial episodes of 
"The Carter Case," the Craig Kennedy 
serial. Mr. Grossman made this arrange- 
ment of meeting the exchangemen half 
way to avoid their coming across the 
continent to view the picture. 

The west is the only territory in which 
the serial is not yet booked and it is ex- 
pected that the showings will imbue the 
western exchange men with the same 
enthusiasm that filled the exchanges of 
other territories when the initial show- 
ings were made. With the completion 
of the western bookings, "The Carter 
Case" will be in the hands of the lead- 
ing exchanges throughout the country. 



"Scandal" Holds Stage 

And Screen in Chicago 

With the Messrs. Shubert advertising 
Constance Talmadge in one of her old 
Select pictures, "Scandal," in which she 
is presented by Lewis J. Sclznick, in 
order to put over their own stage pro- 
duction at the Garrick in Chicago, and 
Select's Chicago Exchange working 
double time to take care of the re-issue 
bookings at the first-run houses, "Scan- 
dal" has literally taken this city by the 
ears. 

Lublincr & Trinz re-booked "Scan- 
dall" over their entire circuit. Select's 

51 



Reunited After 9 Years 




Harry Carey, Universal Star, meets his 
mother in Chicago, where he is 
making personal appearances 



Exchange then booked the attraction 
for seven days at the Star Theater in 
the downtown district. Close on to the 
Star contract and the Lubliner & Trinz 
bookings came the order for play dates 
at each of the fourteen Ascher Brothers' 
theaters. 



Crowds Greet Star 

Harry Carey, Universal's western 
thriller star, now being featured in spe- 
cial productions, put in a busy week 
making personal appearances at the va- 
rious theatres of the Windy City. He 
appeared in twenty theatres during the 
week and greeted upwards of 25,000 
people. Carey has covered about 10,000 
miles in his trip from the coast east. 

During the week Carey's mother, 
widow of the late Judge Harry P. Carey, 
of New York City, came on from New 
York to spend a few days with her son 
and there was a happy reunion after a 
nine-year separation. Harry's brother 
also accompanied his mother. Mrs. 
Carey is the owner of a large dairy farm 
near New York and supplies dairy prod- 
ucts to Mt. Vernon, New Rocheile. and 
surrounding towns. 



At the regular weekly meeting of 
the commissioners of the Illinois Ex- 
hibitors' Alliance last week, W. D. Bur- 
ford was appointed chairman of a com- 
mittee to secure additional members for 
the association within the confines of 
the state, and George D. Hopkinson has 
a similar chairmanship, his territory 
being the city of Chicago. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



^Ullllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

1 CHICAGO NEWS IN BRIEF ( 



If seller Van Husen's opinion registers, 
it surely reflects considerable credit to 
United Theatre Equipment Corp. Van 
reports Power's Cameragraphs being in- 
stalled most everywhere. 

Exhib Appelbaum begs to inform his 
many . film representative friends that 
"The Still Alarm" did not occupy his 
screen at the Ardmore theatre on St. 
Patrick's evening. Just a symptom of 
flame trying to get the best of it in the 
operator's booth. Everything quieted 
nicely and the change continued to flow 
through the cashier's window as usual. 

Looks like Cress Smith, manager of 
Metro, was taking up walking exercise 
here of late. What's the matter, Cress, 
the old Overland fussing again? Ahem! 

With Al Friedlander back from over- 
seas, M. J. Mintz, manager of Unity pho- 
toplays, is arranging for an abundant 
supply of those contract forms to care 
for Al's future sales raids. 

That automobile list of leads, Salkin 
Florine, Mordue and Dillon, as yet ha-: 
shown no results, for these live-wire 
sellers can be seen any evening getting 
the contracts with the pedal operandi 
as the means of locomotion. 

Sam Stoughton, formerly manager o : 
the local W. W. Hodkinson exchange 
is now handling automobile fire insurance 
for one of the well-known national com 
panies. With Sam's large acquaintance 



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in film circles this should prove a big 
money-getter for his exchecquer. 

We saw that live wire go get 'em 
"Mickey" purveyor, I. Maynard Schwartz, 
strutting about the local Rialto arm and 
arm with one of Broadway's biggest the- 
atrical magnates here the other evening. 
Let us in on it, Maynard; curiosity at 
times makes nervous wrecks of some of 



Must be a little money these days in 
the exhibiting end of our great game. 
Lee Herz of the Silee Film Exchange 
has taken over the De Luxe theatre on 
(i3rd street for a two-day run on "The 
Finger of Justice," April 10 and 11. 

Carl Mueller of the Spencer Square 
theatre, Rock Island, 111., has left for a 
six weeks' sojourn at Hot Springs, Ark. 
Watch him, boys, he is a great believer 
in getting all spruced up. Be sure you 
got the goods and your prices are right. 

Talking about S. R. O. signs gracing 
our best motion picture theatres. They 
were surely keeping manager E. F. Tar- 
bell of Vitagraph busy keeping them in 
line March 17. Just paying their rental 
bills in the good old coin of the realm, 
that's all. 

H. A. R. Dutton, president of the Ex- 
hibitors Supply Company, returned 
March :.'4 after an extended business trip 
to New York City. He would not di- 
vulge the nature of his trip, other than 
denying emphatically his company had 
no idea of opening another branch office, 
at least for the present. 

Dolls may be purchased at most any of 
Chicago's best retail stores, Mandel's, 
Marshell Field, the Fair, and others too 
numerous to quote. Just ask the well- 
groomed floor-walker and he will gra- 
ciously direct one to the toy department. 
Some one informed us Maury Rubens, 
the "loop" globe-trotter, was in the mar- 
ket the other day. What's the matter, 
Maury, are the Joliet merchants on a 
strike ? 

Clyde Elliott, between the excitement 
of the near-arrival of his co-partner, 
Flody Brockell, and getting the quarters 
of the new local exchange of the Greater 
Stars Productions, Inc., prepared for 
business, is just beaming with smiles. 
Clyde received a telegram last week re- 
questing the setting back of their initial 
offering, "Hearts of Men," starring 
George Beban, one week, owing to the 
furore this production has caused in Cali- 
fornian film circles. The famous Tivoli 
theatre has requested another week's 
run. F. M. Brockell is expected to arrive 
in Chicago on or about April 5. 

Del Goodman having just been honor- 
ably discharged from service has left for 
New York City. Del will be remembered 
as a member of Pathe's sales department. 

No, Si Greiver is not out campaigning 
for any politicians. Just Si's natural 
sales talent for putting over a winner. 
The way "Spreading Evil" is bringing 
in the currency, it looks as though Uncle 
Sam will have some job checking Si's 
income tax for next accounting period. 

Jack N. Schwartz, who has just re- 
turned to the loop after serving in the 

52 



U. S. army, has hooked up with the 
sales department of Universal's local 
office. 

J. T. Flannagan has resigned his po- 
sition as solicitor for the Herald to 
handle the north side of Chicago for the 
Universal sales department. 

C. C. Klever, Universal's industrial 
representative, returned to the New 
York headquarters after a few days' so- 
journ in Chicago. 

Morrie Livingston, former president 
of the Nu-Movie-Lite Company of Peo- 
ria, 111., has jointed the sales staff of 
Universal. Mr. Livingston, although not 
yet 31 years old, is the inventor of many 
devices to replace the old carbon style 
of light for projection machines. He 
was the first "pick-up" man employed 
by Carl Laemmle in this city and the 
Universal's first feature salesman. This 
was eight years ago, when the infant 
industry was still in its swaddling 
clothes. If Morrie can talk as inter- 
estingly to the exhibs. as he did to a 
Herald representative last Saturday, his 
road should be paved with contracts in 
a short time. 



Pyle After Site 

The F. I. L.- M. Association of Chi- 
cago held an extra session on March 20 
at the City Club, at which time they 
finished the details of organization and 
appointed committees. 

Charles Pyle, the energetic salesman 
formerly connected with the Bartola 
Instrument Company, was appointed to 
inspect various sites suitable for a new 
film exchange building. 

The Illinois Exhibitors' Alliance is 
circularizing the state to get expressions 
from exhibitors on city and state cen- 
sorship. These opinions will be used 
as additional arguments to knock out 
the Buck bill when it comes up before 
the House. 



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JENDAROFPROGRAMPUBLICATIG 



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EXHIBITORS' MUTUAL DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

17 — "The Daredevil," five reels, with Gail Kane. 
— Martin Johnson's "Cannibals of the South Seas," five reels. 
— Affiliated, "The Girl of My Dreams," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 
— "And a Still Small Voice." five reels, with Henry B. Walthall. 
— "All of a Sudden Norma, ' five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 
— "Life's a Funny Proposition," five reels, with Wm. Desmond. 
— "Bonds of Honor," five reels, with Sessue Hayakawa. 
— "Hoop-La," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 

— "The Eleventh Commandment," five reels, with Lucille Lee Stewart. 

— "Trick of Fate," five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 
— "Long Lane's Turning," five reels, with Henry B. Walthall. 
— "The Prodigal Liar," five reels, with William Desmond. 
— "What Every Woman Wants," five reels, with All Star Cast. 
— Martin Johnson's "Cannibals of South Seas," final installment, five 
reels. 

— "A Heart in Pawn," five reels, with Sessue Hayakawa. 
— "The Lamb and the Lion," five reels, with Billie Rhodes. 
— "The Turn in the Road" (Special Cast), five reels. 
— "Hearts Asleep," five reels, with Bessie Barriscale. 
— "Diane of Green Van," five reels, with Alma Rubens. 

STRAND COMEDIES 

"Keep Smiling," one reel. 
"The Girl in the Box," one reel. 
'The Tale of a Hat," one reel. 
'Are Brunettes False"? one reel. 
'Just Home Made," one reel. 
'Dan Cupid, M. D.," one reel. 
'Beans for Two," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
'They Did and They Didn't," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
'Accidental Heroes," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
Some Mother," two reels, with Elinor Field. 
"Easy Payments," one reel. 

'How to Be Happy Though Married," one reel, with Elinor Field, 
y — 'Merely Marrying Mary," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
16 — "Almost a Hero," one reel, with Elinor Feild. 
23 — "Their Baby," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
2 — "The Wigwam System," one reel, with Elinor Field. 
9 — "The Door Between," one reel. 

16 — "His Wife's Birthday," one reel. 
23 — "The Way of a Maid," one reel. 

OUT-DOOR SUBJECTS 

6 — "A Tropic Melting Pot," one reel. 

17 — "Black Feet and Flat Heads," one reel. 
84 — "Bad Men and Good Scenery," one reel. 

1 — "Peaks, Parks and Pines," one reel. 
8 — "A Maori Romance," one reel. 

16 — "Vacation Land," one reel. 
29 — "High and Hungry," one reel. 
6 — "Teetotalers, Tea and Totum Poles," one reel. 
12 — "Geesers and Geysers," one reel. 
19 — "Bulls and Bears." 
26— "Western Stuff." 

2— "Doing the Dells." 
"A Bit of God's Country." 
"Out Wyoming Way." 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

ARTCRAFT PICTURES 

"The Border Wireless," five reels, with Wm. S. Hart. 
'My Cousin," five reels, with Enrico Caruso. 
'Under the Greenwood Tree," five reels with Elsie Ferguson. 
"Arizona," five reels, with Douglas Fairbanks. 
'Greatest Thing in Life," Griffith Special. 
'Squaw Man," six reels, all star cast. 
'Branding Broadway." five reels, with William S. Hart. 
'Out of the Shadow," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 
"Under the Top," fire reels, with Fred Stone. 
'"His Parisian Wife," five reels, with Elsie Ferguson. 
"Here Comes the Bride," five reels, with John Barrymore. 
"The Romance of Happy Valley," Griffith Special. 
"Don't Change Your Husband," DeMille. 
"Breed of Men," five reels, with William S. Hart. 
'Alias Mike Moran," five reels, with Wallace Reid. 
'Johnny Get Your Gun," five reels, with Fred Stone. 
'The Marriage Price," five reels, with Elsie Ferguson. 
'The Poppy Girl's Husband," five reels, with W. S. Hart. 
The Girl Who Stayed at Home," five reels. (D. W. Griffith.) 

PARAMOUNT 

"The Man from Funeral Range," five reels, with Wallace Reid 
"Such a Little Pirate," five reels, with Lila Lee. 
"When Do We Eat?" five reels, with Enid Bennett. 
"The Gypsy Trail," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 
The Make-Believe Wife," five reels, with Billie Burke. 
"Woman's Weapons," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 
"A Daughter of Old South," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 
"Mirandy Smiles," five reels, with Vivian Martin. 
"Fuss and Feathers," five reels, with Enid Bennett. 
"Too Many Millions," five reels, with Wallace Reid. 
'Good-Bye, Bill " five reels, with Shirley Mason. 
"String Beans," five reels, with Charles Ray. 
The Mystery Girl," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 
'Quicksand," five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 
"Little Mis* Hoover," five reels, with Marguerite Clark. 
"The Hope Chest." five reels, with Dorothy Gish. 
"The Way of a Man with a Maid," five reels, with Bryant Wash 
burn. 

•Out of the Shadow," five reels, with Pauline FrdeericV. 
»ii ne P° e * ■-Wooing." five reels, with Vivian Martin. 
The Secret Garden, five reels, with Lila Lee. 
The Du»» " five reels, with Wallace Reid. 
'Venus in the East," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 



16— 



17—' 
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Feb. 2 — "Hard Boiled," five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 

F<rl>. 2 — "Happy Though Married,'' five reels, with Enid Bennett. 

Feb. 9 — "Mrs. Wiggs of Cabbage Patch," five reels, with Margaret Clark. 

Feb. 9 — "Two Brides," five reels, with Lina Cavalieri. 

Feb. 9 — 'The Girl Dodger," five reels, with Charles Ray. 

Feb. 16 — "Boots," five reels, with Dorothy Gish. 

Feb. 16 — "You Never Saw Such a Girl," five reels, with Vivian Martin. 

Feb. 23 — "Maggie Pepper," five reels, with Ethel Clayton. 

Feb. 23 — "Paid in Full," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 

Feb. 23 — "The Winning Girl," five reels, with Shirley Mason. 

Mar. 2 — "Good Gracious, Annabelle," five reels, with Billie Burke. 

Mar. 2 — "Puppy Love," five reels, with Lila Lee. 

Mar. 9 — '"The Poor Boob," five reels, with Bryant Washburn. 

Mar. 16 — "Three Men and a Girl." five reels with Marguerite Clark. 

Mar. 16 — "Extravagance," five reels, with Dorothy Dalton. 

Mar. 23 — "Partners Three," five reels, with Enid Bennett. 

Mar. 30 — "The Malefactor," five reels, with John Barrymore. 

Mar. 30 — "Little Comrade," five reels, with Vivian Martin. 

Mar. 30 — "Peppy Polly," five reels, with Dorothy Gish. 

Mar. 30 — "The Sheriff's Son," five reels, with Charles Ray. 

PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT SPECIALS 

Dec. 1 — "Sporting^ Life," seven reels. 
Jan. 5 — "Little Women," seven reels. 
Feb. 16— "False Faces," live reels. 

TWO-REEL, COMEDIES 

Dec. 22 — Flagg, "Perfectly Fiendish Flannagan." 

Jan. 12 — Sennett. "Never Too Old." 

Jan. 19 — Flagg, Impropaganda." 

Ian. 26 — Sennett, "Cupid's Dav Out." 

Feb. 2 — Stagg, "One Every Minute." 

Feb. 2 — Drews, "Romance and Rings." 

Feb. 16 — Arbuckle, "Pullman Porter." 

Feb. 9— Sennett, "Rip & Stitch, Tailors." 

Feb. 23 — Sennett, "East Lynn with Variations." 

Mar. 2 — Arbuckle, "Love." 

Mar. 9 — Sennett, "The Village Smithy." 

Mar. 16 — Drew, "Once a Mason." 

Mar. 23 — Sennett, "Reilly's Wash Day." 

Mar. 30 — Flagg, "Beresford of Barboons." 

FOX FILM CORPORATION 

BIG, TIMELY PICTURES 

"The Prussian Cur." All star cast, eight parts. 
"The Land of the Free." All star cast, seven parts. 
"Queen of the Sea." Five parts, with Annette Kellerman. 
"Why I Should Not Marry." All star cast, five parts. 

PRODUCTIONS EXTRAORDINARY 

"Cleopatra." Eight parts, with Theda Bara. 
"Les Miserables." Eight parts, with William Farnum. 
"Salome." Eight parts, with Theda Bara. 

STANDARD PICTURES 

Dec. 1 — "The She-Devil," five reels, with Theda Bara. 

Dec. 16 — "I Want to Forget," five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 

Dec. 29 — "For Freedom," five reels, with William Farnum. 

Jan. 12 — "The Light " five reels, with Theda Bara. 

Jan. 26 — "Woman I Woman I" five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 
Feb. 9 — "Every Mother's Son," five reels, All Star Cast. 

Feb. 23 — "The Man Hunter," five reels, with William Farnum. 
Mar. 9 — "When Men Desire," five reels, with Theda Bara. 

Mar. 23 — "Thou Shalt Not," five reels, with Evelyn Nesbit. 

Apr. 20 — "Wolves of the Night," five reels, with William Farnum. 
May 4 — "The Siren's Song," five reels, with Theda Bara. 

VICTORY PICTURES 
Dec. 8 — "The Strange Woman," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 

Dec. 22 — "I'll Say So." five reels, with George Walsh. 
Jan. S — "Treat 'Em Rough," five reels, with Tom Mix. 

Jan. 19 — "The Call of the Soul," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 
Feb. 2 — "Luck and Pluck," five teels, with George Walsh 

Feb. 16 — "Hell Roarin' Reform," five reels, with Tom Mix. 
Mar. 2 — "The Forbidden Room," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 

Mar. 16 — "Never Say Quit." five reels, with George Walsh. 

Mar. 30 — "righting for Gold," five reels, with Tom Mix. 

Apr. 13 — "Pitfalls of New York," five reels, with Gladys Brockwell. 

Apr. 27 — "Helpl Help! Police!" five reels, with George Walsh. 

EXCEL PICTURES 

Dec. 1 — "Buchanan's Wife," five reels, with Virginia Pearson. 

Dec. 16 — "Caught in the Act," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 

Dec. 29 — "The Danger Zone," five reels, with Madlaine Traverse. 

Ian. 26 — "The Girl with No Regrets." five reels, with I'egifv Hyland 

Feb. 9 — "The Love Auction," five reels, with Virginia Pearson. 

Feb. 23 — "Smiles," five reels, with Jane and Katherine Lee. 

Mar. 9 — "Gambling in Souls," five reels, with Madlaine Traverse. 

Mar. 23 — "The Rebellious Bride," five reels, with Peggy Hyland. 

Apr. 6 — "Married in Haste," five reels, with Albert Ray. 

FOX EXTRAVAGANZAS 

Nov 17 — "Fan Fan." 

Nov. 25— "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves." 

THE GREAT NINE SERIES 

Dec. 89 — William Farnum in "Fighting Blood." 

Ian. 6 — Theda Bara in "The Serpent." 

an. 12 — "Regeneration." 

an. 19 — William Farnum in "The Broken Law." 

an. 86 — Theda Bara in "Under Two Flags." 

eb. 8— "Infidelity" (Dr. Rameau). 

Feb. 9— Valeaka Suratt in "The Soul of Broadway." 



53 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Feb. It — Thedm Bara in "The Darling of Paris." 
Feb. 28 — William Farnum in "Hoodman Blind." 

WILLIAM FOX SUNSHINE AND TOM MIX COMEDIES 
Dec. 18 — "The Fatal Marriage." 
Dec. 29— "The Son of a Hun." 
Jan. 12 — Tom Mix in "Hearts and Saddles." 
Jan. 26 — "Oh, What a Knight," 
Feb. 9 — Tom Mix in "A Roman Cowboy." 
Feb. 28— "A Lady Bellhop's Secret." 
Mar. 28 — "Money Talks." 
Feb. 23 — "His Musical Sneeze," two reels. 
Mar. 9 — "Six-Cylinder Love," two reels, with Tom Mix. 
Apr. 6 — "Tom and Jerry," two reels, with Tom Mix. 
Apr. 20 — "The House of Terrible Scandal," two reels. 
May 4 — "A Lady Bell-Hop's Secret," two reels. 

MUTT AND JEFF ANIMATED CARTOONS 

Dec. 22— "The Draft Board." 

Dec 29 — "Throwing the Bull." 

Jan. 6 — "The Lion Tamer." 

an. 12 — "Here and There." 

Jan. 19 — "The Hula Cabaret." 

Jan. 26 — "Doggone Tough Luck." 
Feb. 2 — "Landing an Heiress." 
Feb. 9. — "The Bearded Lady." 

Feb. 16 — "6.000 Miles on a Gallon of Gas." 

Feb. 23— "The Pousse Cafe." 
Mar. 2 — "Fireman, Save My Child." 
Mar. 9 — "Wild Waves and Angry Women." 

Mar. 16 — "William Hohenzollern, Sausage-Maker." 

Mar. 23 — "Out and In Again," half reel. 

Mar. 30 — "A Cow's Husband," half reel. • 
Apr. 6 — "Mutt, the Mutt Trainer," half reel. 

GENERAL FILM COMPANY, INC. 

WM. L. SHERRY SERVICE 

"Romance of the Underworld," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"The Street of Seven Stars," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Out of the Night," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"The Inn of the Blue Moon," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Marriage," five reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"Red Blood and Yellow," five reels, with Bronco Billy. 

"Wild Honey," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Son of a Gun," five reels, with BToncho Billy. 

"Marriage for Convenience," six reels, with Catherine Calvert. 

"Calibre .38." 

"Twilight," six reels, with Doris Kenyon. 

"Love and the Law," six reels. (Edgar Lewis production.) 

BROADWAY STAR FEATURE 
'Tobin's Palm," two reels. 
"The Rose of Wolfville," two reels. 
"A Ramble in Aphasia," two reels. 

BLUE RIDGE DRAMAS — Ned Finley 
"The Raiders of Sunset Gap, ,; two reels. 
"O'Garry Rides Alone," two reels. 
"The Man from Nowhere," two reels. 

ESS AN AY-CHAPLIN COMEDIES 

"A Night in the Show," two reels. 
"Shanghaied," two reels. 
"The Bank." two reels. 
"Police,'' two reels. 

CRYSTAL FILM COMEDY 
'The Lady Detective and His Wedding Day," split reel. 
"Troubled Waters,' one reel. 

"Her Necklace and His Hoodoo Day," split reel. 

CLOVER COMEDIES 
"From Caterpillar to Butterfly," one reel. 
"A Widow's Camouflage," one reel. 
"Love's Lucky Day," one reel. 
"Oh! the Women," one reel. 

DUPLEX FILMS, INC. 

"Shame." seven reels. 

EBONY COMEDIES 
"When You Hit, Hit Hard," one reel. 
"A Black and Tan Mix-Up," one reel. 

ESSANAY COMEDIES 
"Snakeville's New Sheriff," one reel. 
"Sophie's Birthday Party," one reel. 

EXPORT AND IMPORT FILM CORP. 
' Why — the Belsheviki," five reels. 

HANOVER FILM COMPANY 

"Camtlle," six reels. 

"The Marvelous Maeiste," six reels. 

"Monster of Fate."* 

HIGHGRADE FILM ENTERPRISES, Inc. 

"Billie in Society," two reels. 
"Bunco Billy," two reels." 
"Billy in Harness," two reels. 
"Bomb* and Bull," two reels. 

COSMOFOTOFILM 

"Hypocrites." six reels. 
"I Believe, " six reels. 

AUTHOR'S PHOTOPLAYS, INC. 
"Her Moment," seven reels, drama. 

INTERSTATE FILM COMPANY 
The Last Raid of Zeppelin L-Sl." 



FORT PITT THEATRE 
The Italian Battlefront," eight reels. 

OAKDALE PRODUCTIONS 

"No Children Wanted," five reels. 
"Miss Mischief Maker," five reels. 
"Little Miss Grown-Up," five reels. 
"The Midnight Burglar," five reels. 
"Wanted, a Brother," five reels 
The Locked Heart," five reels. 

OFFICIAL AVAR PICTURES 
Committee Public Information 
"Our Bridge of Ships," two reels. 

Committee Public Information 
■**"*•» a Fox Farm," one reel. 

. RANCHO SERIES 
(All Two-Reel Dramas.) 

'In the shadow of the Rockies." 
"Where the Sun Sets Red." 

AMERICAN RED CROSS 

"Rebuilding Broken Lives," one reel. 
"Victorious Serbia," one reel. 
"First Aid on the Piave." one reel. 
'The Helping Hand of Sicily," one reel. 

RAINBOW COMEDIES 

"How She Hated Men," one reel. 
'The Camouflage Baby," one reel. 
"The Pipe of Peace, one reel. 
"Hoovenzing," one reel. 

SCRANTONTA PHOTOPLAY CORPORATION 

Parson Pepp," one reel. 
'Fang's Fate and Fortune," one reel. 

AMERICAN FEATURE FILM CORPORATION 
"Hearts of Love " six reels, with Edna Mayo. 

MAXWELL PRODUCTIONS 
"The Married Virgin," seven reels. 



GOLDWYN PICTURES CORPORATION 

GOLDWYN STAR PRODUCTIONS 

Sept. 2 — 'The Turn of a Wheel," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Sept. 9 — "Peck's Bad Girl," five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Sept. 16 — "Just for Tonight," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Sept. 28 — "The Kingdom of Youth," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Sept. 80— "Laughing Bill Hyde," with Will Rogers. 

Oct. 7— "Hidden Fires," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Nov. 17— "Thirty a Week." five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Nov. 21 — "A Perfect 86, five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Dec 1 — "The Hell Cat," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Dec 8 — "A Perfect Lady," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Dec. 15 — 'Too Fat to Fight," six reels, with Frank Mclntrye. 

Dec 22 — 'The Racing Strain," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Dec 29 — "Go West, Young Man." five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Jan. 12 — "Day Dreams," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Jan. 26 — "Shadows," six reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 

Feb. 2 — 'The Bondage of Barbara," five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Feb. 16 — "Sis Hopkins," five reels, with Mabel Normand. 

Feb. 23 — "The Woman on the Index," five reels, with Pauline Frederic! 

Mar. 9 — "The Brand." seven reels (Rex Beach Soeciall 

Mar. 16 — "A Man and His Money," five reels, with Tom Moore. 

Mar. 30 — "Daughter of Mine," five reels, with Madge Kennedy. 

Apr. 6 — ''Spotlight Sadie." five reels, with Mae Marsh. 

Apr. 13 — "One Week of Life," five reels, with Pauline Frederick. 

GOLDWYN SPECIALS 

"For the Freedom of the World," seven reels. 
'The Manx-Man," seven reels. 

"Heart of the Sunset," seven reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson 
"Blue Blood." six reels. 

"Honor's Cross," six reels, with Howard Heckman. 
"Social Ambition," seven reels. 

"For the Freedom of the East" (Betzwood), six reels. 
'The Border Legion," six reels. 

FORD EDUCATIONAL WEEKLY 

Jan. 18 — "What Uncle Sam Will Do for Two Cents." 
Jan. 20 — 'The Truth About the Liberty Motor." 
Jan. 27— "Hang It All!" 

Feb. 8 — "Carrying Old Glory to the Seven Seas." 
Feb. 10 — "Canada's Mountain of Tears." 
Feb. 17 — "Where The Spirit That Won' Was Born." 
Feb. 24— "Roueb Stuff." 

Mar. 2 — "Good to Eat." 

Mar. !)— "The Story of Steel." 

Mar. 16 — "The Land of Enchantment." ' 

Mar. 23 — "What Uncle Sam Had Up His Sleeve." 

CAPITOL COMEDH5S 

Nov. 17 — "A Pair of Pink Pajamas," two reels. 
Dec 1 — "Proposing Bill," two reels. 

Dec. 16— 'The Jelly Fish," two reels. 

Dec 29— "Poor Innocent," two reels. 

Tan. 12 — "You Know What I Mean," two reels. 

Jan. 26— "The Big Idea." 
Feb. 7 — "Have Another." 

Feb. 23 — "A Master of Music." 
Mar. 9— "The New Breakfast Food." 

Mar. 23 — "The Potum of Swat." 
Apr. 6 — "The Midnight Alarm." 

54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPI1Y 



UENNISON STAR SERIES 

"Oh, Johnny," five reels, with Louis Bennison. 

"Sandy Burke of the U-Bar U," five reels, with Louis Bennison. 
"Speedy Meade," five reels, with Louis Bennison. 
"High Pockets, five reels, with Louis Bennison. 

METRO PICTURE CORPORATION 

Dec. 2 — "The Testing of Mildren Vane," fiv creels, with May Allison. 

Dec. 9 — "Hitting the High Spots," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

Dec 16 — "Svlvia on a Spree, five reels, with Emmy Wehlan. 

Dec. 28 — "The Poor Rich Man," five reels, with Francis X. Bushman. 

Dec. 80 — "Her Inspiration," five reels, with May Allison. 

an. 6 — "The Gold Cure," five reels, with Viola Dana. 

an. 18— "The Spender," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

an. 20 — "The Divorcee," five reels, with Ethel Barrymore. 

an. 27 — "In for Thirty Days," five reels, with May Allison. 

Feb. 8 — "Faith," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

Feb. 10 — "As the Sun Went Down," five reels, with Edith Storey. 

Feb. 17 — "Johnny on the Spot," five reels, with Hale Hamilton. 

Feb. 24 — "Peggy Does Her Darndest," five reels, with May Allison. 

Mar. 3 — "Satan Junior," five reels, with Viola Dana. 

Mar. 10 — "Blind Man's Eyes," five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

Mar. 17 — "The Way of the Strong," five reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson. 

Mar. 24 — "That's Good," five reels, with Hale Hamilton. 

Mar. 31 — -"Parisian Tigress," five reels, with Viola Dana. 

Apr. 7 — "The Island of Intrigue," five reels, with Mary Allison. 

Apr. 14 — -"Out of the Depths, five reels, with Bert Lytell. 

SCREEN CLASSICS. INC., SPECIALS 

"Blue Jeans," seven reels, with Viola Dana. 

"Lest We Forget," eight reels, with Rota Jolivet. 

"The Legion of Death," seven reels, with Edith Storey. 

"My Own United States," eight reels, with Arnold Daly. 

"The Million Dollar Dollies," five reels, with the Dolly Sisters. 

"To Hell With the Kaiser." seven reels. 

"Pals First," six reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

"The Great Victory, Wilson or the Kaiser, the Fall of the Hohenzollems," 
seven reels. 

"Why Germany Must Pay," six reels, All Star Cast, 
"The Great Romance," six reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

"Shadows of Suspicion," five reels, with Harold Lockwood. 

NAZIMOVA PRODUCTIONS 

"Revelation," seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Toys of Fate/' seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Eye for Eye seven reels, with Nazimova. 
"Out of the Fog," seven reels, with Nazimova. 



PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

PATHE SPECIAL FEATURES 
Sept. 8 — "Her Man," six reels, with Elaine Hammerstein. 
Dec. 1 — "Infatuation," six reels, with Gaby Deslys. 
Mar. 2 — "Common Clay," seven reels, with Fannie Ward. 
Apr. 27 — "The Unknown Love," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli and E. K. 
Lincoln. 

EXTRA SELECTED STAR PHOTOPLAYS 

Sept. 22 — "A Japanese Nightingale," five reels, with Fannie Ward. 
Nov. 17 — "The Bells," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
Dec. 15 — "The Narrow Path," five reels, with Fannie Ward. 
Jan. 12 — "The Midnight Stage," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
Feb. 9 — "Todd of the Times," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 
Mar. 9 — "Carolyn of the Corners," five reels, with Bessie Love. 
Apr. 6 — "The Silver Girl," five reels, with Frank Keenan. 

PATHE PROGRAM FEATURES 

Oct. 5 — "The Border Raiders," five reels, with Betty Compson and George 
Larkin. 

Dec. 1 — "Milady o' the Beanstalk," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne. 
Dec. 29 — "Dolly's Vacation," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne. 
Jan. 26 — "A Vagabond of France," four reels, with Henri Krauss. 
Feb. 23 — "The Old Maid's Baby," five reels, with Marie Osborne. 
Mar. 23 — "Go Get 'Em Garringer," five reels, with Helene Chadwick. 

W. W. HODKI5ISOX CORPORATION 

Dee. 30 — "The Challenge Accepted," five reels, with Zena Keefe. 

Jan. 6 — "The Drifters," five reels, with J. Warren Kerrigan. 

Jan. 20 — "The Law That Divides," five reels, with Kathleen Clifford. 

Jan. 27 — "Fighting Through," six reels, with E. K. Lincoln. 

Feb. 10 — "Come Again Smith," five reels, with J. Warren Kerrigan. 

Feb. 16 — "Made in America, first episode of eight one-reel series. 

Feb. 23 — "The Love Hunger," five reels, with Lillian Walker. 

Mar. 9 — "The Forfeit," five reels, with House Peters and Jane Miller. 

Mar. 23 — "The End of the Game," five reels, with J. Warren Kerrigan. 

AMERICAN FILM COMPANY 

"Eyes of Julia Deep," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Money Isn't Everything," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Hobbs in a Hurry," five reels, with William _ Russell. 
"Mantle of Charity," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Rosemary Climbs the Heights, five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"All the World to Nothing," five reels, with William Russell. 
"Wives and Other Wives, five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Fair Enough," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"When a Man Rides Alone," five reels, with William Russell. 
"The Amazing Imposter," five reels, with Mary Miles Minter. 
"Molly of the Follies," five reels, with Margarita Fisher. 
"Where the West Begins," five reels, with William Russell. 

PERFECTION PICTURES 
an. 7 — Kleine, "Quo Vadii/* eight reels. 

an. 10 — Selig. "Brown of Harvard," six reels, with Tom Moore and Haiel 
Daly. 

Feb. 1 — Etsanay, "Men Who Have Made Love to Me," six reela, with Mary 
MacLane. 

Casanay, "Rugglet of Red Gap," six reels, with Taylor Holmes. 

Jan. 21 — Edison, "The Unbeliever," seven reels, with Raymond McKee 

rsaanay, "A Pair of Sixes," six reels, with Taylor Holmes. 

Csaanay, "The Curse of Iku," seven reels, with Frank Borzage. 

Edison. "The Wall Invisible." six reels, with Shirley Mason. 



SELECT PICTURES CORPORATION 

Nov. — "Her Great Chance," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Nov. — "Road Through the Dark," five reels, with Clara Kimball Young. 

Dec. — "The Heart of Wetona,' five reels, with Norma Talmadge. 

Dec. — "In the Hollow of Her Hand," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Dec. — "A Lady's Name," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Dec. — "Code of the Yukon," five reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 

Jan. — "Who Cares," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Jan. — "Cheating Cheaters," five reels, with Clara Kimball Young. 

Jan. — "The Indestructible Wife," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Feb. — "Romance and Arabella," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Feb. — "The Belle of New York," five reels, with Marion Davies. 

Feb. — "Children of Banishment." five reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 

Feb. — "The World to Live In/' five reels, with Alice Brady. 

Mar. — "The Probation Wife," six reels, with Norma Talmadge. 

Mar. — "Experimental Marriage," five reels, with Constance Talmadge. 

Mar. — "Marie. Ltd.," five reels, with Alice Brady. 

SPECIALS 

"The One Woman," with AJl-star cast. 

"The Cavell Case." with Julia Arthur. 

"The Midnight Patrol," an Ince Production. 

"Ruling Passions," with Julia Dean and Edwin Arden. 

"The Hidden Truth," six reels, with Anna Case. 

"Over There," six reels, with Anna Q. Nilsson and Charles Richman. 

TRIANGLE FILM CORPORATION 

Oct. 6 — "Tony America," five reels, with Francis McDonald. 

Oct. 18 — "The Pretender," five reels, with William Desmond. 

Nov. 17 — "Reckoning Day," five reels, with Belle Bennett. 
Dec 1 — "Love's Pay Day," five reels, with Rosemary Theby. 

Nov. 24 — "Deuce Duncan," five reels, with William Desmond. 
Dec 8 — "The Silent Rider," five reels, with Roy Stewart. 

Dec. 16— "Irish Eyes, " five reels, with Pauline tSarke. 

Dec. 22 — "Crown Jewels," five reels, with Claire Anderson. 

Dec. 29 — "Wife or Country," five reels, with Gloria Swansoa. 

Jan. 26 — "Unto the End," five reels, with Crane Wilbur. 
Feb. 2 — "Restless Souls," five reels, with Alma Rubens. 
Feb. 9 — "Secret Marriage," five reels, with Mary MacLaren. 

Feb. 16 — "Child of M'sieu," five reels, with Baby Marie Osborne 

Feb. 23 — "Breezy Jim," five reels, with Crane Wilbur. 
Mar. 2 — "Wild Goose Chase," five reels, with Hazel Daly. 
Mar. 9 — "The Railroader," five reels, with George Fawcette. 

Mar. 16 — "It's a Bear" (specail), five reels, with Taylor Holmes. 

Mar. 23 — "The Little Rowdy," five reels, with Hazel Daly. 

Mar. 30 — "Toton" (special), five reels, with Olive Thomas. 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. COMPANY 

BLUEBIRD PHOTOPLAYS 

Oct. 7 — "The Lure of Luxury," five reels, with Ruth Clifford.' 

Oct. 14 — "Together," five reels, with Violet Mersereau. 

Nov. 18 — "Hugon, the Mighty," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 

Nov. 26 — "Dealing with Daphne," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 

Nov. 26 — "All Night," five reels, with Carmel Myers. 

Dec. 9— "Set Free,' five reels, with Edith Roberts. 

Dec. 16 — "The Cabaret Girl," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 

Dec 28 — "The Light of Victory," five reels, with Monroe Salisbun. 

Dec. 80 — "The Sea Flower," five reels, with Juanita Hansen. 

Dec. 80— "The Cabaret Girl," five reels, with Ruth Clifford. 

ian. 6 — "The Natures Girl," five reels, with Violet Meserea.*. 

an. 13 — "The Craving," five reels, with Francis Ford, 

an. 20 — "The Game's Up," five reels, with Ruth Clifford, 

an. 27 — "Who Will Marry Me?" five reels, with Carmel Meyers. 
Feb. 3 — "Sue of the South," five reels, with Edith Roberts. 

Feb. 10 — "Millionaire Pirate," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury- 

Feb. 17 — "Sealed Envelope," five reels, with Fritzi Brunette. 

Feb. 24 — "The Little White Savage," five reels. Carmel Meyer*. 
Mar. 3 — "A Taste of Life," five reels, with Edith Roberts. 

BLUEBIRD SPECIALS 
"Eagle's Wings," five reels, war drama. 
"Even as You and I," five reels, with Lois Weber. 
"Come Through," seven reels, with Herbert Rawlinson. 

UNIVERSAL FEATURES 
Sept. 9 — "Modern Love," five reels, with Mae Murray. 

Sept, 28 — "The Talk of the Town." six reels, with Dorothy Phillies. 
Oct. 6 — "Fighting for Freedom. 

Oct. 12 — "Three Mounted Men," five reels, with Harry Car«v 

Nov. 18 — "Kiss or Kill," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 
Dec. 2 — "Vanity Pool," five reels, with Mary Maclaren. 

Dec 16 — "Wild Cat ol Paris," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 

Dec. 80 — "Danger, Go Slow," five reels, with Mae Murray. 

Jan. 13 — "After the War," five reels, with Grace Cunard. 

Jan. 27 — "Roped," five reels, with Harry Carey. 

Feb. 10 — "Creaking Stairs," five reels, with Mary MacLaren. 

Feb. 24 — "The Wicked Darling," five reels, with Priscilla Dean. 

Mar. 10 — "The Scarlet Shadow," six reels, with Mae Murray. 

Mar. 17 — "Light of Victory," five reels, with Monroe Salisbury. 

Mar. 24 — "A Fight for Love," six reels, Special, with Harry Cares' 

Mar. 31 — "A Silk Lined Burglar," six reels, with Priscill? Hear 
Apr. 7 — "The Amazing Wife," six reels, with Mary MacLaren. 

VITAGRAPH 

"By the World Forgot," five reels, with Hedda Nova. 

"The Girl of Today," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

"A Diplomatic Mission," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

"The Mating," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

"The King of Diamonds," five reels, with Harry Morey. 

"Everybody's Girl," five reels, with Alice Joyce. 

"Miss Ambition," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

"The Dawn of Understanding," five reels, with Bessie Love. 

"The Man Who Wouldn't Tell," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

"The Beloved Imposter," five reels, with Gladys Leslie. 

"Hoarded Assets, five reels, with Harry Morey. 

"The Captain's Captain," five reels, with Alice Joyce. 

"The Adventure Shop," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

Jan. 27 — "The Enchanted Barn, five reels, with Bessie Love. 

Feb. S--"The Highest Trump," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

Feb. 10 —"Fortune's Child." five reels, with Gladys Lesl'e. 

Feb. I 7 — "Silent , Strength," five reels, with Harry Morey. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Feb. 24 — "The Lion and the Mouse" (special — Alice Joyce). 
Mar. 8— "The Girl Problem," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

Mar. 10 — "The Wishing Ring Man," five reels, with Bessie Love. 

Mar. 10 — "From Headquarters," Special, five reels, with Anita Stewart. 

Mar. 17 — "A Gentleman of Quality," five reels, with Earle Williams. 

Mar. 24 — "Miss Dulcie from Dixie," five reels, with Gladys Leslie 

Mar. 31 — "Fighting Destiny," five reels, with Harry T. Morey. 

Apr. 7 — "The Cambric Mask," five reels, with Alice Joyce. 

Apr. 14 — "The Unknown Quantity," five reels, with Corinne Griffith. 

Apr. 21 — "A Yankee Princess," five reels, with Bessie Love. 

WORLD FILM CORPORATION 

Oct. 7 — "The Appearance of Evil," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

Oct. 14 — 'The Road to France," five reels, with Carlyle BlackwelL 

Dec 8 — "Hitting the Trail," five reels, with Carlyle Blaclrwell. 

Dec t — "The Man of Bronze," five reels, with Lewis S. Stone. 

Dec 16 — "The Zero Horn," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

Nov. 18 — '"Jus* Sylvia," five reels, with Barbara Castleton. 

Nov. 25— "The Grough," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Dec 28— "The Love Net," five reels, with Madge Evans. 

Dec 80 — "The Sea Waif," five reels, with Louise Huff. 

/an. 6 — "What Love Forgives," five reels, with Barbara Castleton. 

. ! an. 6 — "Under Four Flags," five reels. _ 

, an. 18 — "Love in a Hurry," five reels, with Carlyle Blackwell. 

, an- 20 — "The Bluffer," five reels, with June Elvidge. 

] an. XT — "Heart of Gold," five reels, with Louise Huff. 
Feb. 8 — "The Roughneck," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Feb. 10 — "Mandarin's Gold," five reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Feb. 17 — "Courage for Two," five reels, with Carlyle Blackwell. 

Feb. 24 — "The Moral Deadline." five reels, with Frank Mayo. 

Mar. 8 — "Crook of Dreams," five reels, with Louis Huff. 

Mar. 10 — "The Unveiling Hand," five reels, with Kitty Gordon. 



Mar. 17 — "The Hand Invisible," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

Mar. 24 — "Hit or Miss," five reels, with Carlyle Blackwell. 

Mar. 31 — "Love Defender," five reels, with Madge Evans. 

Apr. 7 — "The Little Intruder," five reels, with Johnny Hines. 

Apr. 14 — "The Scar," five reels, with Irving Cummings. 

Apr. 21 — "The Quickening Flame," five reels, with Montagu Love. 

united picture: theatres 

Jan. 6 — "The Light of Western Stars," seven reels, with Duttin Farnum. 

Jan. 26 — "Adele, six reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

Feb. 23 — "A Man in the Open," five reels, with Dustin Farnum. 

Mar. 30 — "Her Code of Honor," five reels, with Florence Reed. 

SERIALS 

Wharton, "The Eagle's Eye" 

Pathe, "The House of Hate" 

Vitagraph, 'The Woman in the Web." 

Universal, "The Lion's Claws." 

Vitagraph, "A Fight for Millions." 

Universal, "The Brass Bullet." 

Gaumont, "The Hand of Vengeance" 

Pathe, "Hands Up." 

Pathe, "Wolves of Kulture." 

Universal, "The Lure of the Circus." 

Francis Ford. "The Silent Mystery." 

Vitagraph, "The Man of Might," William Duncan. 

Vitagraph, "The Iron Test." with Antonio Moreno. 

Pathe, "The Lightning Raider," Pearl White. 

Universal, "The Red Glove," Marie Walcamp. 

Pathe, "Terror of the Range," with George Larkin. 

Oliver, "The Carter Case." with Herbert Rawlinson. 

Pathe, "The Tiger's Trail," with Ruth Roland. 

Universal, "The Midnight Man," with James J. Corbett. 




THE OPEN MARKET 



STATE RIGHTS ISSUES 



SPECIAL PRODUCTIONS 




ARROW FILM CORPORATION 

"The Deemster," nine reels, with Derwent Hall Caine. 

"The Accidental Honeymoon," six reels, with Robert Warwick. 

"The Million-Dollar Mystery," six reels. 

"My Husband's Friend," five reels. 

"Perfect Model," re-issue of "Inspiration," five reels. 

"Finger of Justice," six reels. 

"Sunset Princess." 

ATLANTA DISTRIBUTING CO. 

"Nine-Tenths of the Law." six reels, with Mitchell Lewis. 
"The Devil's Playground, seven reels. 

REX REACH PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Barrier," ten reels. 

BEAR STATE FILM COMPANY 
"The Vigilantes," seven reels. 

DAVID BERNSTEIN 

"Redemption," with Evelyn Nesblt Thaw. 

CARDINAL FILM CORPORATION 
"Joan the Woman," eleven reels, with Geraldine Farrar. 



CHRISTIE FILM COMPANY 

Jan. 16 — "Ob, Baby." 

Jan. 23 — "Good Gracious, Bobby." 

Jan. 30 — "You Couldn't Blame Her." 

Feb. 6 — "For Love or Money." 

Feb. 13 — "Salvation Sue." 

Feb. 20 — "Four of a Kind." 

Feb. 27 — "Welcome Home." 

"Bobby Comes Marching Home." 

"Brides for Two." 

"Oh, What a Night." 

"Hard Luck." 

"Marrying Molly." 

"Apartment 23." 

"Lost — A Bridegroom." 

"Stop, Look and Listen." 

CLUNE PRODUCTIONS 

"Ramona," eight reels. 

"The Eyes of the World," seven reels. 

COMMONWEALTH PICTURES CORPORATION 



"The Frozen Warning 
"Spanuth's Original 1 



'," five reels, with Charlotte. 
'od-A-Vil Movies." 



CORONA CINEMA COMPANY 
"The Curse of Eve," seven reels, with Enid Markey. 

CREATIVE FILM CORPORATION 
"The Girl Who Bidn't Think," six reels. 

CREST PICTURES CORPORATION 
"The Chosen Prince," eight reels. 
"The Grain of Dnat," six reels, with Lillian Walker. 
"A Romance of the Air," five reels, with Lieut Bert Hall. 



EDUCATIONAL FILMS CORPORATION 
(.Robert C. Bruce Scenics) 
"The Wolf of the Tetons," one reel. 
"Nature — Rest and Motion," one reel. 
"Horizon Hunters," one reel. 
"The High Horse," one reel. 
"The Pale Pack Train," one reel. 
"Nature — Hot and Cold." one reel. 
"Men Met in the Mountains," one reel. 
"Before Breakfast," one reel. 



Jan. 31 — "Bringing the Boys Back Home," one reel. 

Feb. 1 — "Photoplay Magazine Screen Supplement," one reel. 

Feb. 3 — "Indian Life," one reel. 

Feb. 10 — "An Indian Love Story," one reel. 

Feb. 17 — "A Day With Caranza," one reel. 

Feb. 24 — "What Is a Mexican," one reel. 

Mar. 3 — "The Washington Air Patrol," one reel. 

EFFANGE FILM COMPANY 
"The Marriage Bond," five reels, with Nat Goodwin. 

EMERALD MOTION PICTURE CORPORATION 
"A Slacker's Heart," five reels. 

ENLIGHTENMENT PHOTOPLAY CORPORATION 

"Enlighten Thy Daughter," seven reels. 

ESKAY HARRIS FEATURE FILM COMPANY 

"Alice in Wonderland," six reels. 

EUGENIC FILM COMPANY 

"Birth," six reels. 

EXPORT & IMPORT FILM COMPANY 

"Humility." 

"Ivan the Terrible," six reels. 
"Loyalty." 

"Robespierre," seven reels. 
"Tyranny of the Romanoffs." 

FELIX F. FEIST 

"Stolen Orders," eight reels, with Kitty Gordon. 

FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS' CIRCUIT, INC. 
"Tarzan of the Apes," six reels, with Elmo Lincoln. 
"Fall of the Romanoffs," eight reels, with Nance O'Neill. 
"Empty Pockets " seven reels. 

"The Passing of the Third Floor Back," with Sir Johnston Forbes-Ro 

"A Dog's Life," two reels, with Charlie Chaplin. 

Ambassador Gerard's "My Four Years in Germany." 

"The Life Mask," five reels, wkh Mme. Petrova. 

"The Light Within," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 

"Daughter of Destiny," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 

"Tempered Steel," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 

"Italy's Flaming Front." Italian official war film. 

"Pershing's Crusaders. 

"Romance of Tarzan," six reels, with Elmo Lincoln. 
"Shoulder Arms," three reels, with Charles Chaplin. 
"The Panther Woman," five reels, with Mme. Petrova. 
"Virtuous Wives," six reels, with Anita Stewart. 

"Our Teddy," seven reels. 

"Sunnyside." two reels, with Charles Chaplin. 

"A Midnight Romance," seven reels with Anita Stewart. 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



FOUR SQUARE PICTURES 

"Madame Sherry," five reela, with Gertrude McCoy. 

"The Submarine Eye," seven reela. 

"Should She Obey," seven reela, with Alice Wilaon. 

"The Great White Trail," six reels, with Doria Kenyon. 

"One Hour," aix reela, with Zena Reef? 

"The Cast-Off," five reela, with Beasie Barriacale. 

"Men." 

"A Woman's Experience," seven reela, with Mary Boland 



FRATERNITY FILMS. INC. 

"The Devil's Playground," with Vera Michelena. 
"The Witching Hour," six reels, with Jack Sherrill. 
"Conquest of Canaan," five reels. 

FRIEDMAN ENTERPRISES. INC. 
"A Mormon Maid," six reels, with Mae Murray. 

FROHMAN AMUSEMENT CORPORATION 

"God's Man," nine reels, with H. B. Warner. 
"My Own United States," with Arnold Daly. 
"Once to Every Man," six reels, with Jack Sherrill. 

HARRY GARSON 
"The Hushed Hour," five reels, with Blanche Sweet 
"The Unpardonable Sin," eight reels, with Blanche Sweet. 

GENERAL ENTERPRISES 

"The Liar," six reels, with Jane Gail. 

"Mother," six reels, with Elizabeth Risdon. 

"The Warrior," seven reels, with Maciste. 

"Crucible of Life," seven reels, with Grace Darmond. 

GRAPHIC FILM COMPANY 

"The Woman and the Beast," five reels. 
"Moral Suicide," seven reels, with Leah Baird. 
"When Men Betray," six reels, with Gail Kane. 

D. W. GRIFFITH 

"The Birth of a Nation," nine reels, with H. B. Walthall. 
"Intolerance," nine reels, with Mae Marsh. 

"Hearts of the World," with Dorothy Gish, Lillian Gish and Robert Harrm 
HOPP HASLET 

"The Vow." 



HANOVER FILM COMPANY 

"Maciste," six reels. 



HARPER FILM CORPORATION 

'Civilization," ten reels. 

HAWK FILM CORPORATION 
"Monster of Fate," five reels. 

HERALD FILM CORPORATION 
"Around the World in 80 Days," six reels. 

KILLER AND WILK 

"Raffles," six reels, with John Barrymore. 
"The Battle of Gettysburg." 
"Wrath of the Gods." 
"Woman," eight reels. 

"The Silent Mystery," 15-part serial, with Francis Ford. 

HISTORIC FEATURE FILMS 

A»r. 10 — "Chrietua." 

THOS. H. INCE 
"The Bargain," six reels, with W. S. Hart. 



IVAN FILM PRODUCTIONS 

"Babbling Tongues." five reels, with Grace Valentine. 
'Married in Name Only," six reels, with Milton Sills. 
"Human Clay," with Mollie King. 

"Sins of Ambition," with Wilfred Lucas and Barbara Castleton. 
"Life or Honor," seven reels, with Leah Baird. 



JEWEL PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

The Doctor and the Woman," five reels, with Mildred Harris. 
"For Husbands Only," five reels, with Mildred Harris. 
"The Geezer of Berlin." 
'The Sinking of the Lusitania." 
( " r rashine Throueh to Berlin," seven parts 

"The Heart of Humanity," nine reels, with Dorothy Phillips. 

JESTER COMEDIES 
Oae two-reel comedy a month, with Twede Dan. 

JAMES KEANE 
"The Spreading Evil," seven reels. 

LEA-BELL COMPANY 
"Modern Mother Goose," five reels. 
"Snow White," four reels. 

MACAULEY PHOTOPLAYS, INC. 
"Whom the Gods Would Destroy." 

MASTER I) it AM A FEATURES, INC. 
"Who's Your Neighbor?" seven reels, with Christina Mayo. 



MAYFAIB FILM CORPORATION 
"Persuasive Peggy," aix reels, with Peggy Hyland. 



B. 8. MOSS 

"The Power of Evil," five reels. 

"The Girl Who Doesn't Know," five reels. 

"In the Hands of the Law," five reels. 



NEWFTELD'S PRODUCING CORPORATION 
"Alma, Where Do You Live," six reels, with Ruth McTammany. 



JOHN W. NOBLE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
"Shame," six reels, with Zena Keefe. 

OGDEN PICTURES CORPORATION 
The Lust of the Ages," five reels, with Lillian Walker. 

SIDNEY OLCOTT PLAYLETS, INC. 
The Belgian," with Walker Whiteside and Valentine Grant. 

OVERLAND PICTURES CORPORATION 
The Hand of Fate." 
The Russian Revolution." 
"Man's Law." 

PARAGON FILM COMPANY 
The Whip," eight reels. 

LEONCE FERRET PRODUCTIONS 
"Stars of Glory," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli. 

"A Sou] Adrift," six reels, with Dolores Cassinelli. 

HARRY RAPF 
The Mad Lover," with Robert Warwick. 
'The Struggle Everlasting," with Florence Reed. 
"Wanted for Murder," five reels, with Elaine Hammerstein. 

HARRY RAVER 
'The Public Defender," with Frank Keenan. 
'The Hand of the Hun," four reels. 
■The Master Crook." 
'The Liberator," serial, with Maciste. 

RIALTO DK LUXE) PRODUCTION! 

"The Unchastened Woman," seven reels. 
"Conquered Hearts." 

SCRE ENGRAFT PICTURES 

"The Prodigal Wife," six reels, with Mary Boland. 

SELECT PHOTOPLAY COMPANY 
'Humanity," six reels. 

SELIG SPECIALS 
"The Crisis," seven reels, with Bessie Eyton. 

"Beware of Strangers," seven reels, with Bessie Eyton and Thomas Saateaa 
"The Garden of Allah," ten reels, with Thomas Santchi and Helen Ware 
"Who Shall Take My Life," six reels, with Thomas Santchi and FritsW 
Brunette. 

"The City of Purple Dreams," six reels, with Bessie Eyton and Thaau* 
Santchi. 

FRANK J. SENG 

"Parentage." 

SELZNICK PICTURE CORP. 
"Upstairs and Down," five reels, with Olive Thomas. 

S-L PICTURES 
"Virtuous Men," with E. K. Lincoln. 

WILLIAM STOERMER ENTERPRISES 
"The Tidal Wave," eight reels. 

SOUTHERN FEATURE FILM COMPANY 
"Beyond the Law," six reels, with Emmett Dalton. 



ERNEST SHIPMAN 

LLOYD CARLETON PRODUCTION* 

"Mother, I Need You," five reels, with Enid Markey. 

UNITED FILMS PRODUCTION 

"The Crime of the Hour," five reels. 

PRIVATE FEATURE FILMS 

"Ignorance," six reels. 

AL AND FRANK JENNINGS PRODUCTIONS 
"Lady of the Dugout," six reels. 



FORD PHOTOPLAY 
"Berlin Via American," six reels, with Francis Ford. 
"A Man of Today," six reels, with Francis Ford. 
"The Fourth Generation," six reels. 

U. S. EXHIBITORS BOOKING CORP. 

"The Zeppelin's Last Raid," five reels, with Enid Markey. 
"Those Who Pay," five reels, with Beaaie Barriacale. 

EDWARD WARREN PRODUCTIONS 
"*Soula Redeemed," with Sheldon Lewis and Charlotte Ives. 



L. LAWRENCE WEBER PRODUCING CO. 
"Weavers of Life," five reels, with Helen Hayes and Howard Hall. 



WESTERN IMPORT 
"Mickey." seven reels, with Mabel Normand. 



57 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



EASTMAN 
FILM 



first made motion pictures prac- 
tical — to-day it plays its full part 
in making the best pictures pos- 
sible. 



1 dentifiable by the words "Eastman " and "Kodak" 
in the film margin 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Pre-eminent in the field of 
portable projection — ideal for 
screening, etc. 

The DeVry 

Let us show you how you too 
can profit by its use. Write to 



THE DEVRY CORPORATION 



1232 Marianna Street 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



FIAT 



LABORATORY 

PRODUCER OF PRINTED AND 
HAND MADE ILLUSTRATED 

TITLES IN ALL LANGUAGES 



THE ONLY EXCLUSIVE LABORATORY 
FOR TITLES AND TRAILERS 

Write for Prices 

220 W. 42nd St. suite 2003.11 NEW YORK 



The Perfect Screen 

Means PERFECT PROJECTION 



THE 



SCREENS 



We Have It All RE ^ l § c F N Do It Now 
de berri scenic Co. 

922 W. MONROE ST. CHICAGO 



TOM PHILLIPS 

The Longest in the Business 
Maker of Advertising Films and Slides 

5728 S. State St. CHICAGO 




FILM CONSERVATION 

By my method of cleaning and softening 
films, you reap maximum results at a 
minimum cost. I am serving the fore- 
most concerns in the country. 

Try my proce.it mnd be convinced 

A. TEITEL, 112 No. La Salle Su Chicago 

Telephone Franklin 3S16 



Coburn Organs 

Perfect tonal results signify 
every instrument we make 



COBURN ORGAN COMPANY 

Builders of Quality Organs 
220 N. WASHTENAW AVENUE CHICAGO, ILL. 



DESIGNING - CONSULTING - SUPERVISING 

William T. Braun 

ARCHITECT 
189 W. MADISON STREET. CHICAGO 



MOTION PICTURE THEATRES AND STUDIOS 



58 



,1. VIII CHICAGO, APRIL 12, 1919 No. 16 




-Well III Be 




*8 
1 I 



will "set em wild" with this first cf 
his big new feature comedies. Albert 
E. Smith, President of Vitagraph, told 
Larry the lid was off the cash-box and 
Larry spent 93% of what was in the 
till on this one. 

Well I'll Be 

is a comedy of super feature quality. 
Go to it— and clean up! 




EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 




"The Price of a Good Time" 
"The Doctor and the Woman" 
"For Husbands Only" 
"Borrowed Clothes" 
"When a Girl Loves" 




MILDRED HARMS 

Show her without fail in 
her five 

LOIS WEbEFL 

Triumph? 

Obfainable. onltj thru 




' Productionr- ,- c 

1600 Broad-vdy- Mc^VorV Q\iy 



\ 
( 



1 



ALBERT RAYwim ELINOR FAIR 

IN THE FIRST OF A SERIES OF THE SWEETEST 
STORIES EVER TOLD 







Directed by Arthur Rosson 

CLEAN, BRIGHT, SNAPPY-TYPICAL OF VOUNG 
AMERICAN MANHOOD AND WOMANHOOD 

A WILLI AAV FOX PRODUCTION 



EXC EL PICTURES 

FOX 

FILM CORPORATION 



Could there beany 
timelier photoplay 
tor your theai 






■»£.*• 



Wavch the papers for 

Sensational announcements 




^PICTURES 



presents 



Bolshevism on Irial" 

(jF all tlie specials ever offered to the nation s exhibitors 
this is the most timely, as it reaches the theatres at a 
moment when the fate of the entire world seems to hang upon 
the progress or the downfall of Bolshevism. 

In this great photodrama is shown what might happen to an Ameri- 
can community if it should he dominated by a Bolshevistic leader. 
It is a story which enthralls and fascinates from start to finish. 

"Bolshevism on Irial 

is not propaganda — is not a preachment — is not "made to order — is not inspired 
or projected by any person or group of persons as a moulder of public opinion. It 
is a photodrama only, but a pbotodrama whose theme and central interest happen 
to be the most interesting topic of the civilized world today. It is entertainment 
of the sort which grips and thrills, which amuses and terrifies, and which never 
fails at any moment to entertain, 

Bolshevism on Irial 

is ready for immediate presentation. The production will be kept before the 
public by a consistent campaign of advertising and publicity. 

This feature is adapted from Thomas Dixon s great novel, 'Comrades, with 
continuity and titles by Harry Chandlee. The story was produced by Mayfl ower 
Photoplay Corporation, Isaac W^olper, President, and is presented in six reels. 

Book Immediately Through All Exchanges 

SELECT PICTURES CORPORATION 

u nited States and Canada 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

Watch Th ese Get the Money! 



B. M ayer — First National Attractions 



In "Virtuous Wives, playing to crowds everywhere 
In a "Midnight Romance, running it a close second 

NEXT RELEASE 

will prohahly he 

"Mary Regan 

The Sensational New York Underworld Story 
A "Best Seller in book form 
Widely syndicated m newspapers 



3ig Star— Big Story— Big Directors 




First National Money-Makers 



EXHIBITORS EVERYWHEKE PROCLAIM IT AN EXTRAORDINARY SPECIAL 

Moore's Rialto Theatre, Washington, D. C. put some big pictures on the shelf to show it- read 
what they say in the Washington Star of March 1 6th : 

"The strongest alignment of film plays ever booked for premiere presentation in Washington has been 
set back to make room at the Rialto this week for the most human drama ever enacted before the camera.' 

Kunsky shelved a regular booking to play it a week at the Madison, Detroit, Michigan's 
exclusive picture theatre. 

A Brentwood Production directed by King W. Vidor 

R^ased throat SS^FS^SSS!? 

EXHIBITORS MUTUAL SSS™5£r,£35S£ 



&E55IE 

MRHfCALE 

Heart Jr 

AJIEEP 

A romance that will make your 
audiences say they have seen 
a mighty good picture— and a 
star that never fails to play 
to big business. 



Kel eased through, 

EXHIBITORS 
MUTUAL 

ROBERTSON-COLE COMPANY 
DlVrSlOM OF FILMS 
BANKERS AND EXPORTER? 
FOR. THE. PRODUCE 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPH Y 

A COMMON-SENSE POLICY 



ET ready for the big clean-up! It's 
bound to come sooner or later, for the 
moving picture industry is fast waking up 
to the fact that advertising in more than 
the five trade journals, which depend en- 
tirely upon the industry for support, is not 
speculating— it's wasting. There is good, 
plain common sense in the statement by 
William Sievers, concerning the practical 
restrictions in the First National Exhibitors' 
Circuit's trade journal advertising policy. 
I feel confident that this limitation of its 
advertising to the five trade journals de- 
voted entirely to the film industry is the 
order of its exhibitor members, and I as an 
exhibitor can say to them as exhibitors 
that they have expressed the opinions and 
thoughts of the majority of our fellow 
exhibitors.— HARRY CRANDALL, 

Owner of the Metropolitan, Crand all's, Knickerbocker, Meade's, 
Apollo, Savoy and Avenue Grand Theatres, Washington, D. C. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND 



MOTOGRAPHY 



I 



til 



CMncZ One Turned to Gold 



TJE was baptized there. We older ones of the congregation 
member how he shrufcfced his tiny shoulders and smiled up 
at the minister when the drops of water trickled from the downy 
head to his baby nose. The fcold star's for Jim-and for those of 
us who loved him well, there's a £old star in our hearts for him. 

The blue ones? Bless your soul, they're half of them back and 
the rest of them coming soon. For every one of those blue stars 
we'll £ive thanks forever. 

What are the blue stars worth? They're worth smiles of solid 
contentment, they're worth all the heart-aches and tears that 
never happened, they're worth a world of thankfulness. 

What are they worth in money? There couldn't be an estimate 
on such a proposition. But we're £oinfc to subscribe to the 
Victory Liberty Loan with such a rush that you'll know how 
ready we are to prove our gratitude for the stars that didn't 
turn to fcold. We're ready to pay the bills for the fci&antic 
preparations that made the Germans quit a year ahead of time 
9 





EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



ATTENTION 

EXHIBITORS! 



A CHANCE OF A LIFETIME 

By Special Arrangement with Mr. D. W. Griffith 

TO BE RELEASED ON RENTAL CONTRACTS 

(in R estricted Territory) 

APRIL 20th, 1919 
D. W. GRIFFITH'S 



SUPREME TRIUMPH 



HEARTS 



OF 
THE 



WORLD 



THE SWEETEST LOVE STORY EVER TOLD 

SOON IN RENTAL 

Send us your best offer — maximum number of days you can play 
tbis production — capacity of your bouse — conditions of equipment 

and full particulars. 

ADDRESS 



GEO. H. DAVIS, GENERAL MANAGER 

MID-WEST HEARTS OF THE WORLD CO. 

1205 CITY HALL SQUARE BLDG. 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Controlling 



WISCONSIN — MINNESOTA 
NORTH AND SOUTH 
DAKOTA 
NEBRASKA— IOWA 
KANSAS-MISSOURI 
OKLAHOMA— ARKANSAS 

and 

TEXAS 




SOL. L. LESSER. PRESIDENT 

ALL STAR FEATURE DISTRIBUTORS 

199 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Controlling 



CALIFORNIA —ARIZONA 

[NEVADA— IDAHO 
OREGON-WASHINGTON 
MONTANA— WYOMING 
UTAH— COLORADO 

and 

NEW MEXICO 




10 



VIRTUOUS MEN 

Starring 

EK-blNCObN 

Is The Great Melodrama 
of the year 



because if contains 



Passive Sets; Gorgeous- Qowns, 
Suspense, Tnrills, Zo ve y Wate, Beauty 

A Fig/it ffiat w ill ma/ce Screen Wistortf 
9500 Teople inThe Qrea t Carnival Balf Scene 

and 

The most SpectacularDratnatic Scene ever 
screened in which 5000 people participate 

Seven months in the mahng By t/iefyasterDirector 



RflbPA INCE 




PICTURES 



FOREIGN DISTRIBUTORS 
J. Frank. Brockliss, Inc. 



grace darling ~ &XJ&eoln 

In a "Big cMpment 
*<me Initial 




eiara Joel ~l&>t.'W(?ummin0s ~JK3.Jl{ack 
r rom 1/irtuous Jf{en 
Ralph 7 nee 3?ilm JTttraction 




pictures 

Fourteen Seventy-Six Broadway 
New York 

March 17th, 1919. 



Llr. John H. Kunsky, 
Madison Theatre Building, 
Detroit, Mioh. 

My dear Mr. Kunsky: - 

Tour inquiries of February 28th and March 
10th regarding our initial production "VIRTUOUS MM," starring 
E. K. Lincoln, have been received. 

My delay in answering your letters has been 
due to the fact that I did not wish to make any statement in 
regard to the picture until it was finally assembled and titled 
so that I could see it in its completed form. 

Appreciating that you are a leading exhibitor 
with extensive theatre interests and knowing that your success 
has been due solely to sound judgment, - I wish to call your 
attention to the fact that in the making of this picture our 
first consideration was that it should contain all the basic 
elements of box office value. 

How that I have seen the picture on the screen, 
I can say with real conviction that under the masterful hand of 
Ralph Ince, this exacting standard has been fulfilled. 

Combining a powerful story, a notable cast, 
elaborate sets, perfect photography and last but not least,- a 
wonderful title, it leaves nothing to be desired to spell success 
and make it the biggest box office clean-up of the year. 

We know that we have a great picture and we 
would like to have you see it so that you may decide whether you 
will book it in your Madison Theatre for one week, two weeks or 
longer. 

Very truly yours, 




EXHIBITORS HERALD, AND MOTOGRAPHV 

EXTRA ATTRACTIONS 




That Boom Business 




When Do You Play Them? 

Bookings placed by Distributed through 

Independent Sales Corp. Film Clearing House, Inc. 

FRANK G. HALL, President 



11 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Sovereign of the West 



Exhibitors £ Herald and Motography today 
maintains incontestable mastery over the 
Middle We st and We stern territory. 



Within twenty-four hours after an issue is off 
the press it is in hands of exhibitors in fifty 
percent of the productive area of the film 
trade — almost telegraphic service ! 



Exhibitors Herald and Motography is unique 
in style, unique in service and unique in the 
opportunity it offers to advertisers to reach 
directly and quickly the most productive area! 
in the trade. 



12 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOT O GRAPH Y 



Backed by the Government! 

Public Health Films announces 
that it has been designated by the 
United States Public Health Serv- 
ice to be the Sole Distributor of 

"FIT TO WIN" 



Originally produced for the War Depart- 
ment Commission on Training Camp 
Activities during mobilization and now con- 
stituting the opening guns of the campaign 
fired by the Government to make civilian 
life cleaner. 

With 



Complete 
Line of 
Advertising 
Matter 



Sergt. Ray McKee 



as 



BILLY HALE 




PERSONALLY DIRECTED BY 
LIEUT. E. H. GRIFFITH 




PUBLIC HEALTH FILMS 

1493 Broadway, Suite 211, Phone: Bryant 9496, New York City 



13 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Chicago Has Been Awakened! 

Thousands of Chicagoans have been jarred into serious 
thought by the thrilling power of the motion 
picture sensation of the hour--- 



The 



Spreading 



Evil 



99 




So many other Chicagoans have been unable to see this astonishing picture 
that it is held for another big week at the 



BAND BOX 



A tumult of approval has met this revolutionary photo-drama, a score of 
United States Senators and Congressmen approving it — SECRETARY OF 
THE NAVY JOSEPHUS DANIELS INDORSING IT and MACLAY 
HOYNE urging every Chicago man and woman to see it. 
Its story of the artist's model who yielded to the fascination of Bohemia and 
whose life, ruined thereby, carries a terrible blight to the world about her is 
one of the strangest plots in all drama. 



Every Mother should see 
this picture and bear its 
warning to daughter before 
it is too late. 



Every Father will be shocked 
out. of his silence into just 
and righteous education of 
his son, by this startling 
picture. 



Every Young Man needs a 
bracing, stirring warning to 
hold him from the awful 
fate of the hero in this vivid 
story. 



Every Young Woman will under- 
stand more clearly her sacred duty 
of purity after seeing the truthful 
expose of Bohemia which "The 
Spreading Evil" so powerfully 
makes. 



£5^\ND box MADISON ST - near LA salle 



Personal Management of JOHN KEANE 



A Repetition of advertisement in Chicago's Sunday papers 

FOURTH BIG WEEK AT THE BAND BOX 

FOR BOOKINGS 
GREIVER PRODUCTIONS 

6th Floor Film Exchange Bldg. Phone Harrison 2451 CHICAGO, ILL* 

Exclusive Distributors Illinois, Indiana and Southern Wisconsin 

14 



E X H I 15 I T ORS HERA L D AND \\ OTOGRAPHY 




PAY YOUR WAY WITH A PROGRAM 

Make Your Money With Specials 



LEAH BAIRD 

The PiLfe 



Wat Will 





oyfc Heart Strings 



A STIBrInG DRAMA OF HUMAN 
/ FRAILTIES 



SPECIALS are SPECIALS 

Released by 

Unity Photoplays Co. 

207 South Wabash Avenue 

CHICAGO 




GAIL KANE 



15 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



|p HEADLINER 

HOLDS THE 

SPOTLIGHT 



1729 

POWERS 
CAMERAGRAPHS 

SELECTED TO PROJECT PICTURES 
FOR THE BOYS OVERSEAS 

DELIVERED 
THE GOODS 




IN THE HISTORY OF 

PICTURE 
PROJECTION 

"Nicholas Power Company 

INCORPORATED 

Pioneers of pPO/'ecUorp 
90 GOLD ST. NEW YORK.N.Y. 



CATALOG No. 19 GIVES FULL DETAILS 



16 



2 g^TJLTJUULLXAAJ 



liiwaiiiiiMMM 



Editorial, Comment oe TmWttK 

by MartinJ- Quigi^y 



- ^y^rx^ra-f CCCCCC003 



THROUGH ii quartet of capable leaders Ike mo- 
tion picture industry in Chicago last Friday 
enunciated its attitude toward the censorship ques- 
tion in a thoroughly comprehensive and effective 
manner. 

To William A. Brady. Walter W. Irwin, Paul H. 
Cromelin and Gabriel L. Hess the industry owes a 
big debt of gratitude. This committee faced in Chi- 
cago a censorship situation pregnant with all the diffi- 
culties that years of effort on the part of the pro- 
ponents of censorship has built up. and acquitted 
themselves in a manner that leaves no doubt as to 
the validity of the principle for which they are fight- 
ing and. as to their entire sincerity and earnestness. 

Since the very start of the attempt to control and 
harness the motion picture by legislation there prob- 
ably has never been a more intelligent and convinc- 
ing argument. Even those members of the Chicago 
commission who are adamant against any proposition 
for the elimination of pre-publication censorship at 
this time admitted freely that the position assumed 
by these representatives of the industry is perfectly 
secure and that the only difficulty remaining is the 
practical administration of the situation. 

One of the biggest developments of the meetings 
was the declaration by Mr. Irwin that the industry 
is not only willing but anxious that the entire ques- 
tion of censorship be put up squarely to the people 
by referendum vote. 

This proposition while receiving informal discus- 
sion at various times never previously had been an- 
nounced as the formal attitude of the industry. 

Mr. Brady in closing his argument declared that 
the industry does not intend to submit to any in- 
justices whatsoever in the matter of the censorship 
of motion pictures and that if it is driven into a 
defensive position it will make a determined effort to 
use the screens of the country politically for the first 
time for the defense of the business. 

A matter that occasioned considerable comment 
was the fact that despite the assurance of the chair- 
man that the commission was maintaining an open 
mind on the subject a considerable portion of the 
session was taken up by arguments of members of the 
commission. 

A very significant result of the hearing was the 
narrowing down of the entire question simply to 
the consideration whether or not pre-publication 
censorship has the sanction of public opinion. 

This situation comprises in itself an unquestion- 
able solution to the entire problem. 



iniMnmii'iii'iiiiiffliiiiiraiiifflniimiffliiiniiinffliiii 




THE effectiveness of the motion picture as an 
educator of the masses and a inolder of public 
opinion will lie tested in a special production just 
announced for publication by the Select Pictures 
Corporation, "Bolshevism on Trial." 

As has been recognized by every government of 
importance this spirit of anarchistic unrest is the 
great problem of the moment. In no way so effec- 
tively and graphically can the evils of this movement 
be impressed upon the masses as by the motion pic- 
ture. What can be accomplished in no other way 
can be forcibly driven home to the masses by the 
medium of the screen. 

In the short space of a few weeks millions will be 
a fleeted by a picture of this type, principles of good 
government will be instilled more deeply and those 
rank disorders of social and political life will be 
branded so decisively that the misguided will be 
warned away from those tendencies which lead to 
inevitable disaster. 

$ $ # 

BEFORE the Pennsylvania judiciary the board of 
censors was recently called severely to task as 
reported elsewhere in this issue. The notorious E. P. 
Oberholtzer, secretary of the board, assuming the posi- 
tion that the theme of a Goldwyn picture, "The 
Brand." is immoral found great difficulty in attempt- 
ing to get the court to share his viewpoint. As a 
result the action of the board was characterized as 
"stubborn and unreasonable" and the picture received 
the approval of the most highly respected branch of 
our form of government — the judiciary. 

Oberholtzer's boasted record in reference to re- 
versals is gradually becoming weaker. 

* * * 

THERE is room for discussion as to the soundness 
of this community booking plan that is coming 
into use. 

Certainly, giving three, four or five houses in a 
particular zone the same picture for identical runs 
is eliminating any great chance of complaint from 
the exhibitor who is greatly anxious about what his 
opposition is playing. 

But the aggregate attendance of all the theatres 
concerned in such a plan is almost certain to be con- 
siderably less than in a situation wherein the people 
of the district are given something in the way of a 
choice of pictures. 

Giving the same picture to a group of theatres on 
the same day is inclined to look very much like 
humoring the exhibitors at the expense of the public. 
Except in very rare cases diversified offerings at se\ - 
era! theatres in a certain zone will attract a greater 
aggregate attendance. 



^MnnmimnniiniiniiiinifiiinimniramiiMmiimiiiniimtiiiiHiiifiimifriHiiiiHminiiniiimfininnm 



17 



MARTIN J. QUIGLEY 
Publisher 



All editorial copy and 
business correspondence 
should be addressed to 
Chicago office. 



Forms close 6 P. M. 
Mondays. 



EXHIBITOR 




MOTOGMAPHY 



THE INDEPENDENT FILM TRADE PAP E Rj 



NEWS OF THE WEEK 

Film Men Demand Popular Vote of People on 
Censorship Before Chicago Censorship Board 19 

St. Louis Exhibitors and Musicians W ill Fight 
Copyrighted Music Tax 24 

Pennsylvania Censors Put on Crill by Judge in 
Common Pleas Court 25 

( iovernor Campbell of Arizona Vetoes Film Ex- 
change Bill 25 

W. W. Hodkinson Corporation Begins Enlarge- 
ment of Business Activity 2o 

Pennsylvania Buries Sunday Bill; Outlook 
Brightening in New York 27 

Four Men Indicted in Fire Prevention Bureau 
Graft Case 7. 27 

Sawyer and Lubin's Big Feature to be Presented 
April 6 28 

Submarine Feature Provides Thrill in "The 
White Heather" 28 

To Hell With Yesterday, a Survey of the Motion 
Picture Industry Today and Tomorrow 29 

"The Carter Case" Is Well Received at First 
Showing 32 

Samuel S. Hutchinson Sees Great Future for 
American-Made Film 33 

W illiam L. Sherrill to Star Mack Swain in 
Comedy Pictures 39 

Reviews 

"Hearts Asleep," Exhibitors-Mutual D, five 

parts, with Bessie Barriscale 35 

"Daughter of Mine." Goldwyn C-D, five parts, 

with Madge Kennedy 55 

"The Girl Who Stayed Home," Artcraft D, seven 

parts 35 

"Hearts of Men.'' Hiram Abrams Prod. D, five 

parts, with George Beban 35 

"That's Good," Metro C-D. five parts, with Hale 

Hamilton 36 

"The Little Intruder." World C-D, five parts, 

with Louise Huff 36 

"Fighting for Gold," Fox I), five parts-, with 

Tom Mix 36 

"The Sheriff's Son." Paramount 1), five parts, 

with Charles Ray 36 

"A Midnight Romance," First National C-D, 

seven parts, with Anita Stewart 37 

" \n \mafeur Liar." Paramount C, two parts, 

with Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew 37 



"Captain Kidd. Jr.." Artcraft C, five parts, with 
Mary Pickford ^7 

"The End of the Game," Pathe-Hpdkinson I), 

five parts, with J. W arren Kerrigan 37 

"Cannibals of South Seas." Exhibitors-Mutual 
L, five parts with Mr. and Mrs. Martin 

Johnson 38 

"Fit to W in," Public Health Films D, six parts, 

with Sergeant Raymond McKee 38 

Departments 

The Cutting Room 31 

Exhibitors Bureau 41, 42 

What the Picture Did for Me 43. 44. 45. 46. 47 

I leraldgrams . . .• 48 

Canadian Film Events 49 

Chicago Trade Events 50, 51. 52 

Calendar of Program Publications 53. 54, 55 

The Open Market 56, 57 

Advertisers 

All Star Feature Distributors 10 

Central Theatre Supply Co 5$ 

DeBerri Scenic Co 58 

Exhibitors Supply Co 58 

First National Exhibitors Circuit 5 

Fiat Laboratory 57 

Fox Film Corporation 4 

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation 1 

Greiver Productions 14 

Independent Sales Corporation 11 

Jewel Productions 3 

Mid- West Hearts of the \Vorld Co 10 

National Poster and Printing Co 58 

Nicholas Power Co 16 

Pathe Exchanges. Inc 60 

Public Health Film Co 13 

Robertson-Cole Co 6, 7 

T. L. Robinson & Co 58 

Select Pictures Corporation Opp. Page 4 

S-L Pictures Opp.- Page 10 

Tyrad Pictures, Inc 40. 48 

Unity Photoplays Corporation 15 

Vitagraph 2 

Westgate Hotel Co 52 

Woodstock Typewriter Co 52 



Volume VIII APRIL 12, 1919 Number 16 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Film Men Demand Popular Vote of People 

On Censorship, Before Chicago Board 

William A. Brady, Walter W. Irwin, Paul H. Cromelin 
And Gabriel L. Hess Make Strong Pleas for "Square 
Deal" — Participants Engage in Verbal Battles 
Over Complex Question — Many Exhibi- 
tors Present to Support Speakers 

"Submit the question of censorship of motion picture films to a popular vote of the people, and 
I will withdraw all my objection. I am confident that the people are overwhelmingly opposed to 
all forms of censorship." 

Walter W. Irwin, chairman of the executive committee of the National Association of the 
Motion Picture Industry, hurled this challenge to the Chicago censorship commission during the 
course of the hearing given officials of the N. A. M. P. L, Friday, March 28. 

His statement followed insistence on the part of members of the commission that censor- 
ship was popularly demanded — that the great maj Drity of people insisted upon it. It brought forth 
a reply that 1,200 judges, ministers, social workers and other representative citizens and the public 
school teachers, in response to letters, had unanimously expressed themselves as favoring cen- 
sorship, and that several large organizations had passed resolutions in favor of censorship. 

"I don't care a snap of my finger for the resolutions," returned Irwin. "The people who passed 
those resolutions did not hear both sides of the case, and did not realize that their rights as Amer- 
ican citizens were being trammeled. If you are so sure that censorship is popular, why don't you 
submit it to a vote?" 

It appeared for a time that the speaker had swept the censorship committee from its feet. 
Rev. Father F. G. Dinneen immediately declared he would be willing to submit the question to the 
people. 

Chairman Hurley, however, pointed out that the board had no authority to call an election 
and the discussion ended. It was evident, however, that Mr. Irwin's insistence on his point had 
made a deep impression and a recommendation from the commission of a popular vote on the 
matter is not unlikely. 

Mr. Irwin, Paul H. Cromelin, William A. Brady and Gabriel L. Hess addressed the commis- 
sion, presenting the motion picture industry's side of the censorship debate. All four gave force- 
full addresses. So interested were members of the commission that the usual adjournment hour 
of 5 :30 o'clock was ignored and the meeting extended well into the evening. 

Enlivening the session were frequent verbal fireworks indulged in between the speakers 
and members of the Chicago commission, Rev. Fleming and Rev. Dinneen leading the discussion 
for. the board. 



Gabriel L. H«ss, secretary-treasurer of 
the Goldwyn Pictures Corporation and 
chairman of the censorship committee, 
was in charge of presenting the case of 
the National Association of the Motion 
Picture Industry to the Chicago censor- 
ship commission and introduced the va- 
rious speakers. 

Censorship Before Presentation 

"In referring to the word censorship," 
he said in opening the meeting, "the mo- 
tion picture industry means censorship 
before presentation. I speak for the in- 
dustry when I say we are opposed un- 
alterably to every form of censorship. 
We are not opposed to the suppression of 
immoral and salacious pictures and we 
offer every aid to prevent their being 
shown. 

. "The National Association of tin- Mo- 
tion Picture Industry has fought censor- 
ship consistently. It is a broad theory 
and its basis is un-American, undemoc- 
ratic, and a violation of the spirit if not 
the letter of the constitution of the 



United States and the constitution of 
every state in the union." 

He then introduced Paul F. Cromelin. 
vice president of the N. A. M. P. I., presi- 
dent of the Inter-Ocean Film Company, 
American representative of the London 
Film company., president of the Cinema 
Distributing Corporation, and former 
representative in the United Kingdom 
for Thomas A. Edison. 

Cromelin Asks Fair Hearing 

"I am a business man with a pretty 
wide national experience. I have had 
unusual opportunity to consider censor- 
ship here and abroad. I am pre-stippos- 
ing that this commission has not a pre- 
determined idea on the subject. I am 
pre-supposing that it will grant that the 
overhelming majority of producers want 
only clean pictures. 

"I don't want you to view the industry 
from the viewpoint of today but from 
that of tomorrow. No industry in the 
past ten years has shown such improve- 
ment. Motion pictures are the vogue. 



They have an enormous power for either 
good or evil. I trust that you give 
credit to the majority of producers that 
they strive to direct' this great force for 
good — not evil. 

"Don't condemn this great industry be- 
cause there is an occasional abuse of 
privilege. There are bad pictures. The 
question is 'what can be done to prevent 
them?' A irood many good people say 
'censorship before publication' — the ap- 
pointment of a board or commission to 
consider and determine that which the 
people shall and shall not see. 

Considers Question Nationally 

"Pet us consider this question nation- 
ally. Do you consider the motion pic- 
ture of today a spreader of tilth and cor- 
ruption — a diseased and unclean thing 
which cannot be shown the public for 
profit until a commission, politically ap 
pointed or otherwise, shall determine 
what they shall or shall not see? 

"Don't take such a course. It is 
dangerous. Consider the picture in- 



10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



dustry ten years from now. Do not 
think that the manufacturers, who have 
their dollars invested in this industry, 
will see it prostituted to immorality. 

"What if prior to publication, every 
newspaper owner and magazine owner 
had to go before a police sergeant's desk 
and submit what they are going to print. 
That is what they did in autocratic Rus- 
sia. That is just what you do when you 
insist on censorship prior to publication. 

"Because there are a few bad pictures, 
don't set up as your remedy the censor- 
ing of every foot of film. Treat the 
subject from our angle. The producers 
will support any and every movement 
intended to improve their art. Do not 
make every man producing pictures sub- 
mit to the onerous, tiresome, expensive 
delay of censorship. 



Laws Are Adequate 



"Each city has the power to suppress 
immoral pictures. Put real teeth into 
your city ordinances whereby any man 
who attempts to flaunt indecent pictures 
will be punished severely. 

"We believe that legalized censorship 
leads to graft, corruption, politics, greed, 
revenge, religious and social hatred and 
a thousand other evils. The enforce- 
ment of your present laws, fines and im- 
prisonment for their violation, will make 
censorship unnecessary. Repression after 
action is the remedy. Then the industry 
will be preserved. 

"If a clergyman writes a sermon, he 
may preach it with all the power and 
vigor God has given him. There is no 
power in the land to prevent him. If 
he takes what is destined to be the 
most modern way of expressing his 
thoughts — writes it so that every child 
can understand — he must submit it to a 
committee to be censored." 

"Our object is to prevent crime and 
not to punish it," interrupted Rev. W. S. 
Fleming. 

'Then how would you suppress im- 
moral pictures?" asked Alderman George 
Maypole. 

"I would stop them when shown," 
returned Mr. Cromelin. "The majority 
of producers would like tp see the law 
strictly enforced." 

Asks Freedom of Expression 

Mr. Cromelin then stated that he be- 
lieved a Socialist, for instance, had the 
right to produce a film presenting his 
ideas to the public. 

"And I would hate to see that time 
come when a Socialist cannot have the 
freedom of expression," he declared. "I 
would hate to see him have to submit 



his picture for judgment to men, receiv- 
ing $1,200 to $1,400 a year, who often 
go to sleep while viewing pictures." 

Rev. Fleming asked Mr. Cromelin if 
he did not believe it was fair to require 
voters to register before they voted in 
Chicago. Mr. Cromelin said he did. 

"Then if you approve of regulation as 
to voting, why do you object to regula- 
tion of motion pictures?" demanded Rev. 
Fleming. 

"I see no parallel," returned Mr. Cro- 
melin. 

The questioning shifted to the question 
of school children attending motion pic- 
ture theatres. Mr. Cromelin stated that 
he considered that a matter of "parental 
control," but that he favorably regarded 
a law in New York which prohibited 
children under 16 years of age from at- 
tending motion picture theatres unless 
accompanied by an adult. 

"Are you connected with the National 
Board of Review'" asked Rev. F. G. 
Dinneen, 

"I am." 

"Then how do you reconcile your state- 
ment that you are opposed to all forms 
of censorship?" asked Father Dinneen. 

Father Dinneen's Question 

"The national board is a voluntary 
organization which sets upon pictures 
for the purpose of making suggestions 
to improve pictures and try to devise 
some means to get away from indecent 
pictures," replied Mr. Cromelin. "It is 
not a censorship in the general mean- 
ing." 

"Isn't that invoking censorship?" de- 
manded Father Dinneen. 



N. B. of R. Defended 



"Why, every producer censors his own 
films and welcomes suggestions," re- 
turned Mr. Cromelin. "Every news- 
paper editor censors his items, to guard 
against libel and immoral statements. 
That is not censorship as we speak of it." 

"And the national board has failed to 
eliminate bad pictures," said Father Din- 
neen. 

"It has not failed," replied Mr. Crom- 
elin, "It has not struck 100 per cent 
efficiency. " 

"Boston, Massachusetts, accepts the 
recommendations of the national board- 
as a sufficient guarantee as to a picture," 
interposed Gabriel L. Hess. 

"The picture 'Hypocrites' is an insult 
to everything you and I hold sacred," 
declared Father Dinneen. "And it had 
the O. K. of the national board. The 
national board is a discredited organiza- 



tion. Why? Because it has no legal 
power. It-is a failure." 

"It is not a failure — but it is not per- 
fect," returned Mr. Cromelin. "It has 
accomplished a great deal of good." 

"It hasn't cleaned up the industry," 
said Father Dinneen. 

"Nor has your Chicago board of cen- 
sors," returned Mr. Cromelin. 

Offers to Show Cutouts 

"We can take you to the tenth floor 
of this building and show you cutouts 
from pictures, made by the Chicago 
board, which would make you blush 
with shame," said Father Dinneen. 

"It has done as much as most humans 
can do," said Mr. Cromelin. 

A discussion of the legal right of 
censorship followed, which came to an 
end on the order of Chairman Hurley. 



Irwin Takes Floor 



Walter W. Irwin, chairman of the 
executive committee of the N. A. M. P. 
I., vice president of the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corporation, and former official 
of the Vitagraph company, then took 
the floor. 

An Experience with Censors 

In opening his talk, Mr. Irwin told of 
one of his experiences with censorship. 
He said that he had planned an excur- 
sion to Russian with motion pictures to 
bolster up the morale of the Russian 
army and people and strengthen the 
Kerensky government. If he had been 
permitted to go, he said, he was satis- 
fied that the Russians would have re- 
mained in the war and the spring drive 
in 1918 which cost the lives of 58,000 
American soldiers would not have taken 
place. I 

"And the arbitrary act of one govern- 
ment official, who said 'no', prevented 
me from going," he said. "It was taste 
of censorship which I will never forget." 

Continuing he pointed out how the 
motion picture was acquainting the va- 
rious nations with each other, teaching 
people that fundamentally, their hopes 
and aspirations are the same. He de- 
clared that upon this work, the success of 
a League of Nations depended. 

"Will the motion picture industry be 
permitted to grow to fulfill its destiny?" 
he asked. "It isn't right to let three or 
four men, I don't care who they are, say 
how this industry shall be run. 

"In Europe, we find censorship in 
Russia, Germany and Austria, not in 
England and France. France will not 
permit the execution of a human being to 
be shown. That is the only restriction. 
In autocratic Russia and the central 



I"" 1 " uiwiiiiiHiuiiiiiinwniiw^ 

"Why Brand the Industry? 1 ' Asks William A. Brady 

"If the present ordinances prohibiting immoral pictures are enforced, there will be no need of censor- | 

| ship. 

"I go on record that I will participate in the prosecution and punishment of any man who places a § 

| filthy, immoral, impure and indecent picture on the screen. You secure one conviction and the need of j 
| censorship will end. Put one blackguard behind the bars. 

"Why brand the motion picture industry? Co-operate with us. Would you like to try an experi- | 

1 ment? Put the motion picture on its word for one year in Chicago and I will come out here and aid you § 

| in the prosecution of any producer or any theatre owner producing or displaying an unclean or improper 1 
| picture. 

"Censorship before publication is what we object to. The motion picture men are responsible for j 

their acts. If they produce unclean pictures, they violate the law and should be punished." — William A. § 
Brady, theatrical and motion picture producer and president of the N. A. M. P. I. 

lliiiiinMuwffliiniiiiiiiuwiaiinniiiiiifliiiiiM 

70 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHV 

CENSORSHIP COMMISSION SECRETARY AND PROMINENT FILM MEN ATTENDING CHICAGO HEARING 




Left to ri^ht — Martin J. duigley, publisher of the Exhibitors Herald; Walter W. Irwin, chairman executive committee, X. 
M. P. I.; William A. Brady, president, N, A. M. P. I.; Arthur Ryan, representative of D. W. Griffith; Gabriel L. Hess, 
chairman anti-censorship committee IV. A. M. P. I„ and Peter J. Schaefer, national president of the Exhibitors Ass'n. 



powers, we found strict censorship. In 
Germany, no criticism of even the small- 
est government official could be made. 

Is Founded on Intolerance 

"Censorship is fundamentally based on 
intolerance. Those who urge it are of 
the temperament of those who burned 
witches at the stake. They are leaders 
of the Bolsheviki, who are the worst ad- 
vocates of intolerance. What is the 
meaning of these small movements today 
of men who want to become their 
brothers' keepers? If it's a people's 
question, why not submit it to the 
people?" 



Rap at Oberholtzer 



"Oberholtzer of the Pennsylvania 
board of censors is going through the 
country, I am told, with a string of dele- 
tions from films, showing them as hor- 
rible examples. It is a fraud and a de- 
ceit. It is unfair to show a part of a 
film without showing its connection 
with the rest of the picture. You can't 
successfully show good, without con- 
trasting it with the bad. 

"A bad scene removed from a picture 
and displayed by itself is simply bearing 
false witness, a fraudulent evidence. No 
court will receive in evidence a sentence 
<>r a paragraph from an article. No 
scene stands independently, they are put 
in for contrast and to show both right 
and wrong. 

"Tt is useless to attempt to censor 
the press, because the people would not 
permit it. Then why censor this new 
vehicle of thought transmission? The 
reason is that the people are busy with 
other things and are not giving the ques- 



tion proper attention. That is why small 
minorities all over the country are foist- 
ing censorship on the people. Why not 
submit this question to a vote of the 
people ?" 

Explains Board's Action 

"The majority in Chicago favor cen- 
sorship," declared Father Dinneen. "Our 
board sent out 1,200 letters to ministers, 
judges, school teachers and other repre- 
sentative citizens. Every answer insisted 
on high class people censoring films. 
We then sent out questionnaires to 
school teachers and every one suggested 
a board of censorship. 

"I don't consider that a determination 
of the mind of the people," returned Mr. 
Irwin. "I would not take those letters 
as a fair indication until I had examined 
the letters and answers." 

"The Holy Name society with 50,000 
members, and the Foresters with 35,000 
men and an equal number of women, 
have passed resolutions favoring censor- 
ship." resumed Father Dinneen. 

"I don't consider their resolution-; 
worth a snap of the finger," returned Mr. 
Irwin. "And I'll tell you why. The 
personnel of those organizations didn't 
hear both sides of the question. They 
did not realize that their rights as Amer- 
ican citizens were being trammeled." 



Asks Popular Vote 



! 



"They got both sides of the question 
bv seeing the pictures," declared Father 
Dinneen. 

"Then if you are so sure a majority 
favors censorship, why don't you submit 
the question to the people?" 

71 



"I aril willing to submit the question 
to a popular vote," declared Father Din- 
neen. 

"All right," declared Mr. Irwin. "If 
this commission will vote now to sub- 
mit this question to a vote, then the 
motion picture industry will close its 
side of the case right now." 

"This commission has not the author- 
ity to call an election," interposed At- 
torney Kraus. 

"Hold on," exclaimed Chairman Hur- 
ley, rapping for order. "We do not in- 
tend to be swept from our feet by our 
New York visitors. You are here at our 
invitation to give us light on the censor- 
ship question, not to tell us how to run 
our board. Proceed with the hearing." 

"Newspapers have destroyed thousands 
of people, often unfairly," resumed Mr. 
Irwin. "But it is far better that those 
people be destroyed than the principle 
of freedom of the press be tampered 
with. It is far better that bad picture- 
be shown than that the freedom of ex- 
pression be tampered with." 



Censorship Dangerous 



Asked if censorship would not save 
children from seeing these bad pictures 
be referred to, Mr. Irwin declared that 
censorship if carried to the extreme 
would make children "mental slaves with 
no initiation." 

"You are connected with Famous 
Playcrs-Lasky ?" asked Rev. Fleming. 

"I am," replied Mr. Irwin. 

"Then I want to say that 'Carmen' is 
the most unsatisfactory and indecent 
film — " began Rev. Fleming. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



"Censorship Means 

Political Graft" 

"Do you consider the mo- 
tion picture of today a spreader 
of filth and corruption — a dis- 
eased and unclean thing which 
cannot be stiown the public for 
profit until a commission, polit- 
ically appointed or otherwise, 
shall determine what they shall 
and what they shall not see? 

"Every city has the power 
to prevent the showing of un- 
clean pictures. Put real teeth 
into your ordinances whereby 
any man who attempts to flaunt 
immoral pictures can be pun- 
ished severely. 

"We believe that legalized 
censorship leads to graft, cor- 
ruption, politics, greed, hatred, 
revenge, religious and social 
hatred, and a thousand other 
evils." — Paul F. Cromelin, 
president of the Inter-Ocean 
Film Company and vice-presi- 
dent of the N. A. M. P. I. 



Brady Enters Argument 

"Did you see the stage play and the 
grand opera?" demanded William A. 
Brady, leaping to his feet. 

"No," replied Rev. Fleming. 

"Why do you permit 'Carmen' in grand 
opera or on the stage?" demanded Mr. 
Brady. "Stop the man who pays $0 a 
seat for his grand opera, not the man 
who pays ten cents to see the picture." 

When the fireworks died down, Mr. Ir- 
win resumed. In answer to a question 
raised earlier in the proceeding by At- 
torney Kraus in regard to Jewish people 
in undesirable parts in pictures, Mr. Ir- 
win told of a film produced to carry 
home the lesson of the Triangle Build- 
ing fire in New York, where several 
hundred girls died because the exit in a 
sweat shop was locked. He said that 
a Hebrew was selected because Hebrews 
controlled the clothing industry, includ- 
ing the finest factories and the sweat 
shops. When the film was shown, he 
said, it accomplished great work, but 
that hundreds of Hebrews protested 
against a Hebrew being placed in the 
part of the owner. 



The Race Question 



"You went out of your way to find the 
crookedest nose and homeliest face pos- 
sible," interposed Attorney Kraus. 

"I did not," returned Mr. Irwin. "I 
selected a well known Jewish actor — a 
man who is practically a star in his own 
right." 

"There arc plenty of your race in the 
industry to protect the Jewish people," 
inteT)nsc'1 Mr. Brady. 

Mr. Irwin then cited an instance where 
a beautiful film portraying the life of 
Christ was censored, the censors order- 
ing the showing of the crucifixion cut 
»o liv*- feet, a mere flash. 



"The one part of the film which would 
win men back to their church," he said. 

"If a board acts arbitrarily, it can be 
brought into court," suggested Father 
Dinneen. 

"If all censorship was stopped; what 
assurance would we have that the Fa- 
mous Players-Lasky company would 
give us clean pictures?" asked Rev. 
Eleming. 

"Let this commission see that tin 
present laws are enforced," responded 
Mr. Irwin. "See that the state's attorney 
prosecute men who display immoral 
films.'' 

Wants Due Process of Law 

"All we want is due process of law. 
Where anything is shown that is im- 
moral, cancel the theatre's license. Then 
we will get our day in court and have 
a judicial hearing — not an arbitary hear- 
ing before three or four men — an Ameri- 
can proceeding. 

"If the Famous I'layers-Lasky Cor 
poration puts out a picture, your com- 
mittee thinks is immoral, prosecute us; 
line us so hard it will hurt. Make your 
state's attorney do his work*; make your 
license commissioner do his work." 

"Then you want court censorship in- 
stead of censorship by a commission?" 
demanded Rev. Fleming. 

"I want a judicial hearing, which as 
an American citizen I am entitled to. 
Let us go ahead. I will assist you in 
prosecuting people who display immoral 
films." 

"Have you ever assisted in prosecut- 
ing an immoral producer?" asked Rev. 
Fleming. 

"No," replied Mr. Irwin. 



Words Are Passed 



"You are using double words." re- 
turned Rev. Fleming. "Let me cite you 
an example. We have a tubercular hos- 
pital here which cost thousands of dol- 
lars. We investigated and found that 
most of the tuberculosis developed in 
the crowded sections of the city. Now 
we are trying to improve conditions so 
that there will not be tuberculosis. Pre- 
vent not cure. That is the same with 
censorship — we want to prevent, not 
prosecute." 

"I see no parallel. Your illustration 
is not logical," returned Mr. Irwin. 

"Do you think that a court would be 
as able to judge pictures as well as a 
board of experienced men?" asked Alder- 
man Maypole. 

"Boards I have seen are not made 
up of experienced, nor even educated 
men," replied Mr. Irwin. 

"If such a board was created, would 
you prefer it to going into court?" asked 
Alderman Maypole. 

"No," replied Mr. Irwin. "It would 
not give us a hearing in a judicial way." 

"You have got all the personal weak- 
nesses and prejudices to contend with 
without the advantage of a judicial hear- 
ing," he said. "You never can tell what 
any individual is going to do with a pic- 
ture." 

Irwin Is Emphatic 

"Irregardless of picture houses bei" r 
closed, and companies being dragged 
into court rcpeatedlv, you prefer that 
way to censorship?" asked Alderman 
Ma vnole. 

"Ves. sir! Yes, sir'" exclaimed Mr. 
Irwin emphatically. "It is American." 



In regard to the Chicago censorship 
board, Mr. Irwin said he had found it 
"narrow minded, prejudiced and follow- 
ing arbitrary rules." 

As Irwin was finishing, another clash 
occurred. Rev. Fleming arose to say 
that censorship was intended to prevent 
the showing of immoral films. 

"Do you prevent murder by censor- 
ship?" demanded William A. Brady. 



A Warm Exchange 



"As long as the motion picture produc- 
ers make insulting and debasing pic- 
tures" — stated Rev. Fleming. 

"I won't stand for that," shouted Mr. 
Brady. "You are insulting business 
men. You are slandering the good men 
and women of the stage." 

"I didn't." 

"You did." 

"Gentlemen, this, is Chicago, not New- 
York," interposed Chairman Hurley. 
"We don't want to be insulted. We are 
here to follow our authority and receive 
light on censorship." 

We have a right to tell you our views 
on the situation and make a recom- 
mendation to .you," declared Mr. Irwin. 
"We have a right to defend our prop- 
erty." 

'And we have a right to defend our 
children," returned Rev. Fleming. 

"Don't misconstrue my sincerity," said 
Mr. Irwin in concluding his talk after 
order had been restored. "I hope you 
will believe me, when I say that if I 
didn't have a dollar invested in this in- 
dustry, I would be here just the same. 
I am telling you my honest views of 
the question." 

William A. Brady was the next 



Hess Is Opposed 

To All Censorship 

"In referring to the word 
censorship, the motion picture 
industry means censorship be- 
fore presentation. I speak for 
the industry when I say we 
are opposed unalterably to 
every form of censorship. We 
are not opposed to the sup- 
pression of immoral and sala- 
cious pictures, and we offer 
every aid to prevent their be- 
ing shown. 

"The National Association 
of the Motion Picture Industry 
has fought censorship consist- 
ently. It is a broad theory and 
its basis is un-American, un- 
democratic, and a violation of 
the spirit, if not the letter, of 
the constitution of the United 
States, and the constitution 
of every state in the Union." — 
Gabriel L. Hess, secretary- 
treasurer of Goldwyn Pictures 
Corporation and chairman of 
the censorship committee of 
the N, A. M. P. I. 



22 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



SIKIIlijl i! i ip i r m m 1 1 : i u i i 1 1 1 1 1 r: 1 1 1 m 1 1 i j : i ' i ' I : i r 1 1 1 j i f 1 1 11 ■ l 1 1 1 m i r 1 1 n < 1 1 ! 1 1 1 l 1 1 M] I L1 1 j i r 1 1 1 ; 1 1 N 1 1 1 b 1 1 ; ) l I [ b 1 1 1 : ■ ^ LJ I ; J J M . 1 1 1 1 1 ; J i i L I N n : I M I ! J r L ! 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 : ; i I ! 1 H J I r r i : 1 ' 1 1 1 1 7 - - iiiliiini UiU'lTQn tllU JltriJIIII I IliCIII I Jilt U4HIM II II Jlllll [i IUUIJ Jllir llHIIIirtlJIIIltllUlfllllll UIJlilllllillllJXUlllllELIIIIIlIlllJMlJrUllllJIIil tllllllilllltltllllitllllJIU^ 

Submit Question to People, Urges Walter W. Irwin 

"I am here as an American citizen. I am opposed to censorship because it is against the principles | 
| for which men died in the Revolutionary war and in the war just closed. 

"Censorship is fundamentally based on intolerance. Those who urge it are of the temperament of | 

1 those who burned witches at the stake. They are leaders of the Bolsheviki, who are the worst advocates 1 

j of intolerance. What is the meaning of these small movements today of men who want to become their I 
j brothers' keepers? If it's a people's question, why not submit it to the people? 

"My solution is thoroughly consistent with Americanism. Let this committee attend to its own city, | 

| see that its own laws are enforced. Then we won't be having our property taken away without due process | 

1 of law; we won't be subjected to censorship before publication. Let us have our day in court." — Walter F 

j W. Irwin, vice-president of the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation and chairman of the Executive Com- | 
I mittee of the N. A. M. P. I. 



SiHiPiliuiininiinniuiMiuuuiM 



speaker. He punctuated his remarks 
with many salient facts concerning the 
legitimate stage as well as the picture 
screen. He stated he is the second oldest 
producer of plays for the legitimate 
theatre in the country, and in 1901, with 
Thos. A. Edison, made the first 'motion 
picture ever shown upon the screen. 
Tells of His Productions 

"1 produced "Little Women," "Way 
Down East," "The Shepherd King" and 
many Shakespearian plays and never 
have I ever intentionally made an un- 
clean picture or play. In the past two 
or three years, there have been elimina- 
tions made from my pictures in Chicago 
hut never any serious ones." 

At the beginning of the war, Mr. Brady 
stated he was appointed by President 
Wilson to- represent the motion picture 
industry in the war work and stated 
that the industry as a whole, had ren- 
dered the government an invaluable 
service without charge, aiding the Red 
Cross drives, the Y. M. C. A. and other 
organizations, as well as the Liberty 
Loan campaigns. 

Gives Facts on War 

"The Y. M. C. A. has recognized the 
fact that the theatrical profession has 
rendered a great service and it has been 
admitted over the signature of John R. 
Mott, that the finest method of preserv- 
ing the morale of the men over there, 
is to give them good, clean entertain- 
ment. Our men are still going over. 
These men of the legitimate stage work 
for nothing. It is quite true that the 
theatre and everything pertaining to it, 
has been spoken of as the devil's work- 
shop. I am not paid to come here. I 
have paid my own expenses. I am con- 
siderably over 50 years of age. The mo- 
tion pictures gave me my opportunity to 
do my bit. I am no longer young. I 
am an old man of the theatre who will 
defend the men and women of the pro- 
fession. Who came first to render aid 
to tin stricken in the Iroquois fire, the 
Johnstown Hood, and other disasters? 
The men and women of the theatre. 

Comes of Church Family 

''My father was a pastor of San Fran- 
cisco. My wife is Grace Georee. As 
gbpd a woman as ever lived. She has 
been doing constructive work for war 
sufferers. My daughter, who is Alice 
liradv, is as good Christian girl as there 
is in New York. I represent the theatri- 
cal people. 



"1 say if the present ordinance pro- 
hibits the showing of improper pictures 
in this city and an exhibitor shows an 
improper picture his license should be 
revoked and he should be jailed. I will 
go on record and assist in the prosecu- 
tion of an}- man who shows any inde- 
cent, immoral or obscene picture upon 
the screen. I will say it to the people 
of the United States. I say it to the 
gentlemen of this commission, you se- 
cure one conviction in the city of Chi- 
cago, and there will be no need of cen- 
sorship. There are blackguards in every 
walk of life. Put them behind the liars. 
There are some in your flock, I dare- 
say. Father Dinneen. I will make this 
statement: the motion pictures are im- 
proving. There is an attempt to keep 
out the filth, to drive the immoral out of 



Why Brand Industry? 



"The day is coming, gentlemen, when 
every classroom in the country will have 
its screen. The children will be edu- 
cated by motion pictures. If you have 
discovered that the motion picture is 
such a great educator, why brand that 
industry? 




!irjiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiii)i«i[imitiiii;iiiiiiiiiii,ii uiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiAiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiii^ 

Suggests an Experiment 

Would you like to try an experiment? 
Put the mot'on picture industry on it> 
word for twelve months in Chicago. We 
will show you how to clean up the indus- 
try. We want to get your angle. We 
don't want to be treated like mad dogs. 
W e don't want to be muzzled. 

"We will admit that in every home in 
America, the liner the home the surer 
the case, you will find the works of Wil- 
liam • Shakespeare. Vet you know ac- 
cording to the laws of censorship you 
cannot place those stories upon the 
screen. Take Richard 111. King John, 
etc. Why don't you prevent your chil- 
dren from reading Shakespeare? Sup- 
pose you took the stories of. the Bible 
you couldn't show them upon the screen 
according to your tensorship." 

Father Dinneen objected, stating he 
thought Mr. Brady was unfair. 



Sees Discrimination 



BETTY HOWE 
Who uppearN in Niipport of I. call llnlril In 
tilt- HiMlkliiNOii production "Vn ii 

Man Thtnkb." 

23 



"My general argument is that there 
are many things wrong in the world." 
continued Mr. Brady. "You should not 
legislate the pictures out of business and 
let the others go. The United States 
government is at present preparing a 
picture showing the acts of the Bolshe- 
viki. They propose to circulate it 
through the United States. Don't brand 
the industry. The United States is fur- 
nishing pictures to Japan, Siberia, and 
oven Germany. We want the aid of the 
church, we don't want to antagonize the 
church. I have been thirty years in the 
business, and cannot today judge a plav 
before it is shown to the public. No- 
body can judge a dramatic production 
before it is exploited. 

"Why was 'The Little American.' with 
Mary Pickford, suppressed here?" 

"Because it depicted atrocities com- 
mitted by the Germans." said Martin J. 
Ouiuley, secretary of the commission. 

"But we were at war at the time. 
Perhaps somebody here had political as- 
pirations," returned Mr. Brady. 

"Why should an industry — said to be 
the fifth industry of the United States 
be subject to censorship because live or- 
maybe ten pictures are off color?" 

Father Dinneen then asked if Mr, 
Brady thought the country should have 
pure food laws and the inspection of 
meats to protect the physical health of 
the people. Brady thought we should. 

Several exhibitors, prominent among 
whom was Sam Katz, spoke in oppos ; 
tion to censorship, stating that exhibit- 
ors censor their own films'. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 

NAZIMOVA IN SCENES FROM "THE RED LANTERN" 





Produced at a cost of a quarter of a million dollars, this Nazimova production is said to be the distinguished artist's greatest achieves 

in cut. It is the first of a new series of pictures to be distributed •>> Aietro. 



St. Louis Exhibitors and Musicians 
Will Fight Copyrighted Music Tax 

Theatres Bar A. S. C. A. P. Music and Play 
Numbers Furnished by Publishing Houses 
Not in Combine; Move Is Successful 

The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers, which has 
been reaping a harvest from exhibitors all over the country, struck a snag when 
it opened its campaign to collect tribute down in St. Louis, Mo. 

Convincing Missouri theatre managers that they must pay 10 cents per 
seat per year to the A. S. C. A. P. for the privilege of playing copyrighted 
music proved about as easy as attempting to collect a tax on the air patrons 
breath. 

Exhibitors Organize to Fight 

Instead of paying up and signing a contract, the St. Louis exhibitors with 
t he cooperation of their orchestra leaders are selecting music not controlled 
by the A. S. C. P. A. and the results up to date have been very satisfactory. 



In fact, publishers connected with 
the A. S. C. A. P. are said to be bend- 
ing every effort to get their music back 
in several of the theatres which have 
thrown it out and are waiving the tax 
privilege. 

Thomas Terry, orchestra leader at 
the Lyric theatre, is one of the most 
active of the theatre men opposing the 
combine. 

Thomas Terry's Statement 

"The Schirmer and Carl Fisher Pub- 
lishing companies, representing two of 
the biggest music publishers of any 
kind of music except ragtime in the 
country, and Jerome H. Remick, repre- 
senting the ragtime music, besides num- 
erous smaller concerns throughout the 
country, are not members of tbe society 
and their music can be played without 
tax," declared Mr. Terry. 

"Some of the leading picture show 
musicians in St. Louis have not only 
cooperated with the managers but have 
gotten together and decided upon re- 
fusing to play any of the A. S. C. A. P. 
music, not only for the time being but 
in the future unless their rules are modi- 
fied considerably. 



"I have noticed rubber stamps and 
printed permission on numerous orches- 
trations for public performances in 
theatres on the society's music." 
Others Expected to Follow 

The step taken by the St. Louis ex- 
hibitors and musicians is expected to 
result in a determined effort to avoid 
the tax in other parts of the country. 

Many states have already signed up 
contracts with the combine for the com- 
ing year, but are expected to organize 
their opposition before the present con- 
tracts expire in 1920. 

Buffalo, N. Y., is one of the latest 
cities to be invaded by the A. S. C. A. P. 
and on threat of being called into fed- 
eral courts, most of the exhibitors are 
said to be signing up. 

A representative of the Herald, 
who recently toured Illinois foand the 
music tax the principal topic of discus- 
sion among all exhibitors. Feeling 
against what is termed "excessive 
charges" runs high. 

Ohio Is Now Invaded 

CLEVELAND, OHIO.— At last the 
American Society of Composers, Authors 
and Publishers has made good its threat 



to come into northern Ohio and force 
the exhibitors to pay a license to play 
the music of its members or play other 
music. 

And the exhibitors say they will boy- 
cott the organization's music and get 
along with that composed by others. 

The society has established headquar- 
ters at 1019-1020 Guardian building, 
Cleveland, and engaged Frankel & 
Frankel, a firm of well-known attorneys, 
to put on the "clean-up." 

These lawyers have sent out letters to 
all theatres notifying them of the so- 
ciety's purposes, and that they must have 
permission of the authors to play their 
copyrighted music. To get this, the 
attorneys inform the exhibitors that they 
must call at their office "and arrange 
for the issuance to you of a license to 
perform such musical compositions. 

They also give the exhibitors due 
notice that if they do not secure such a 
license they must immediately desist 
from using such compositions, and en- 
close a copy of the copyright law, copies 
of recent court decisions rendered in 
favor of the society and a list of its 
members. 

This list contains the names of most 
of the composers and publishers of note 
but there arc many well-known authors 
and pubb'sher^ not on it, among them 
the Von Tilzers and Terome H. Remick 
& Co. 

The exhibitors say there are enough 
composers and publishers not in the so- 
ciety to keep an ordinary theatre going 
;t year without repeating any music and 
that they will get along nicely without 
music by the society's members. 

Thanhauser Directors 

Form New Corporation 

(Special to the Herald.) 
NEW YORK.— The Eugene Moore 
Productions, Inc., has just been incor- 
porated with its headquarters at New 
Rochelle. Eugene Moore, former direc- 
tor for Thanhauser, is president, and 
Harris Gordon, former assistant direc- 
tor for Thanhauser, is vice-president. 
George H. Mohr, local cierar manufac- 
turer and secretary to Mayor Waldrof 
of New Rochelle, is treasurer and gen- 
eral manager. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



Pennsylvania Censors Put on Grill 
By Judge in Common Pleas Court 

E. P. Oberholtzer and Assistants Branded as 
Stubborn and Arbitrary and Rebuked for 
Abusing Their Authority 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. — Under sharp questioning by Judges Rogers 
and Wessel, in Common Pleas Court, members and employees of the State 
Board of Moving Picture Censors were compelled to admit that they had 
overstepped the authority vested in them by law in arbitrarily and unqual- 
ifiedly rejecting and condemning the seven-reel photodrama, "The Brand," 
by Rex Beach. 

Judge Rogers himself interrupted the proceedings to put into the 
record his own statement that during a view of the picture given the two 
judges in the Board of Censors' projecting room, Thirteenth and Cherry 
streets, just before the trial began, Mrs. Katherine M. Niver told him no 
matter what changes were made, either in the picture or the sub-titles, it 
would not be accepted. 

Board Stubborn and Arbitrary 

The judge's statement allowed of no inference, but that he personally 
was convinced that the board was acting under a stubborn and arbitrary 
use of its supposed authority, and later on he said so in so many words. 



The only witnesses called in the pro- 
; ceedings, which were brought by the 
Goldwyn Distributing Corporation 
against the board's refusal to pass the 
picture on an appeal, were connected 
with the board, with one exception, and 
all admitted that the picture had been 
rejected, not because it visualized any- 
, thing calculated to corrupt the public 
morals, but because its 'theme" was im- 
moral. 

"Theme! Theme!" Judge Rogers 
finally interrupted sharply. "Drop this 
talk about the 'theme' and tell us what 
i there is immoral about the picture. I've 
just seen it, and I'm frank to say that 
with two sub-titles eliminated, as the 
plaintiffs have voluntarily agreed to do, 
I see nothing immoral about it. 
Authority Is Questioned 

"Do you people know the law under 
which you view and pass these pic- 
tures? The trouble seems to be more 
in your condition of mind than in the 
picture itself. The legislature distinctly 
stated in the Act creating the Board of 
Censors what its duties and its authority 
were to be. It didn't give the board any 
authority to pass upon or even assume 
what construction some persons might 
put upon something imagined, but not 
shown upon the screen at all." 

"There is no place in the world," in- 
terjected Attorney Wolf for the plain- 
■ tiffs, "where property rights are so ar- 
bitrarily thrown in the gutter as they 
are by this board." 

"It seems to be true," supplemented 
Judge Wessel, "that we are dealing with 
a peculiar condition of mind, rather than 
with anything immoral, or even alleged 
to be immoral, that is shown in this 
picture. The board thinks that theo- 
logical conclusions to be drawn would 
be immoral, but admits that the picture 
itself is not." 

"I was in Alaska a comparatively short 
time ago," said Judge Wessel, "and al- 
though conditions have changed, I had 
pointed out to me the dilapidated places 
I and abandoned buildings which were the 
scenes of just such incidents as are por- 
trayed in this picture. What is wrong 
with the film itself, leaving aside the 
i board's interpretation of what construc- 
tion someone might put on it?" 



Oberholtzer Is Quieted 

"Well," said Ellis Paxson Oberholtzer, 
secretary of the board, who was then on 
the stand, "the story is of a wife who 
leaves her husband to live with another 
man, and the theme is immoral." 

"But you haven't any authority over 
the theme, as we understand the Act," 
said Judge Rogers. "What is there im- 
moral about the picture?" 

"We found its immorality in that," an- 
swered Mr. Oberholtzer. "Of course, 
we may be wrong in considering our 
authority to go that far. I have listened 
with a great deal of interest to the com- 
ments of the court " 

"You needn't proceed any further with 
that," ordered Judge Rogers sharply. 
"We're not interested in what you think 
of our opinions." 

Oberholtzer flushed and started to 
apologize, and Judge Wessel took up the 
reprimand. "It was a most unusual re- 




WILLIAM FAHNVH 
The l<'ov Star, in a kcciic from "VVolven of 
tin- Night," a Standnrd picture. 

25 



piiniiiiiipiiinip^ 

| 'Herald' Is the Paper 

| Says Bloomington Man j 

CASTLE THEATRE 
j Bloomington, III. 

1 To EXHIBITORS HERALD § 

AND MOTOGRAPHY: 
1 / consider the EXHIBITORS § 
1 HERALD JUST THE PAPER j 
| for the exhibitor. Am watching | 
I closely your Exhibitors Bureau j 
| on Hozu to Advertise. 

Very truly yours, j 
(Signed) W . R. Lyon, 

Castle Theatre, 
Bloomington, III. j 

fjxmm milium NmiNNiimiiiiiimiimiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiimniiiiiiiimmiimmiiiimiiiimm 

mark," he said. And he then ordered the 
stenographer to eliminate it from the 
record. 

Thaddeus R. Hellerman, a justice of 
the peace in Cheltenham township when 
he isn't viewing films as inspector for 
the Board of Censors, gave his reasons 
as similar to those of Dr. Oberholtzer 
for condemning the picture. He then 
started to criticize sub-titles and men- 
tioned several. 

Calls Testimony Valueless 

"This witnesses's testimony on sub- 
titles is valueless," said Judge Rogers, 
peremptorily, "because he's not telling 
the truth. I've seen the picture and if 
the witness is expressing a personal 
opinion it is radically different from 
mine." 

The court finally ordered both sides 
to submit briefs, which will be done 
next week, and Deputy Attorney General 
William I. Swope, who, as representa- 
tive of the Board of Censors, was try- 
ing his first film case, seemed glad of 
the respite offered to prepare his argu- 
ments in the privacy of his own office. 



Governor Campbell 

Of Arizona Vetoes 

Film Exchange Bill 

PHOENIX, ARIZ.— Governor Camp- 
bell's veto of a bill which would have 
required every company distributing film 
in Arizona to establish a branch ex- 
change within the state assures the con- 
tinuance of picture theatres in the state. 

Following a conference with repre- 
sentatives of the Southern California 
Film Exchange Board of Trade, Gov- 
ernor Campbell took immediate action 
to kill the bill. 

The delegation notified the governor 
that the expense incident to establish 
ing exchanges was too great to justify 
establishing exchanges. The result of 
the bill, if signed, they said, would be to 
keep film out of Arizona and would close 
up the lOfi theatres in the state. 



McGowan Joins Goldwyn 

Kenneth McGowan, a former 
Member of the staff of the New 
York Tr&tmte has been appointed 
Advertising Manager of the Gold- 
wyn Pictures Corporation^ 



EXHIBITORS. HERALD AND MOTOGRAPHY 



W. W. Hodkinson Corporation Begins 
Enlargement of Business Activity 

Addition of F. B. Warren to Executives Is 
Simultaneous With Announcement of 
Acquiring Zane Grey Pictures 



Election of F. B. Warren as vice presi- 
dent of the W! W. Hodkinson Corpora- 
tion and announcement that the Hodkin- 
son organization is to handle Zane Grey 
Pictures, coming within a few days of 
each other, forecasts an immediate en- 
largement of the Hodkinson activities. 

As vice president and director of the 
Goldwyn Distributing Corporation, Mr. 
Warren has established a name for him- 
self in publicity and advertising activi- 
ties, and is thoroughly familiar with 
everj' phase of the distributing and sale- 
end of the business, 

Mr. Hodkinson's Statement 

"] think Mr. Warren shares my own 
opinion a> to the necessity for the in- 
tegrity of product and the improvement 
of relations existing between the ex- 
hibitor and distributor of motion pic- 
tures," said Mr, Hodkinson in making his 
announcement "J have watched his de- 
velopment in the industry, and have felt 
that his previous experience as an editor 
and publisher of .important newspapers 
gave him a soimd base for straight think- 
ing. After all. both the making and the 
selling of motion pictures is a publishing 
function, and the most successful pub- 
lisher of pictures will be the one. who 
rejects unfit materials in hi}: search for 
the selective, finer materials upon which 
he can place his imprint. 

'"During the past year the W.. W. Hod- 
kinson Corporation has proceeded with 
great deliberation to build- an. internal 
organization capable of doing the big 




ami i: Jdi < k 
htnr of \ lta(?rni»h*H lutt-xt production! "The 
Cambric Mn»k." 



things we have in prospect. We have 
not wished to expand too quickly, for 
that has been one of the big faults of the 
industry both in its business and produc- 
tion sides. 1 am now gathering about 
me both the men and the product that 
will make our company's name stand for 
a definite quality in production and serv- 
ice. And by service 1 mean our busi- 
ness relations with the exhibitor as well 
as the aids rendered the exhibitor in con 
junction with the pictures he receives 
from us. I shall next week make a com- 
prehensive announcement of the product 
that 1 have assembled for our new sea- 
son together with some plans for a re- 
leasing innovation which I am certain 
wjll win exhibitor support immediately." 

The Zane Grey Announcement 

The identity of the second of the big 
new lines of product to be handled by 
the W. W. Hodkinson Corporation is 
made public this week, with the anounce- 
ment that the Hodkinson organization 
is to handle the Zane Grey Pictures. Inc. 
The announcement of the first of the 
new Hodkinson lines was made in this 
paper two weeks ago, when it was offi- 
cially given out that the Augustus 
Thomas — Harry Raver Artco Produc- 
tions, known as the Four Star series, di- 
rected by George Irving and featuring 
Leah Haird, would be put on the market 
by the Hodkinson Corporation. 

It is the opinion of Mr. Hodkinson 
that the Zane Grey Pictures are thor- 
oughly worthy of being offered to the 
exhibitors and to the public as produc- 
tions of the highest type — genuinely big 
pictures, big in every sense of the word, 
thoroughly in keeping with the Hodkin- 
son policy of handling only the best pro- 
ductions that can be secured. 



2,000,000 Feet of Film 

To Boost Victory Loan 

.WASHINGTON.— The motion picture 
industry has been mobilized for the Vic- 
tory Loan drive. More than 3,000,000 
feet of film will be employed in explain- 
ing the necessity for buying bonds — "and 
more bonds." One 5,000-foot film, "The 
Price of Peace," contains battle scenes, 
including the American attack on 
Chateau-Thierry. Among the actors 
who have made films are Douglas Fair- 
banks and Julian Eltinge. 



Return From Service 

JOLIET. ILL.— H. A. and Claude B. 
Rubens of the famous Rubens family, are 
back in the exhibitor business here again. 
II. -A. was a sergeant in the army, while 
Claude B. was in the naval aviation serv- 
ice." 

•' ■ '» = 

New Film Rights Sold 

Jacquez Tyrol of the Tyrad Pictures, 

Inc., has acquired the American and 

Canadian rights to the feature. "Your 
Wife and Mine." 



3 in 1 



Fred B. Thompson, Inventor of 
Processing Machine Is Also Ex- 
pert Chemist and Engineer 




FR10II B. THOMPSON 

Fred B. Thompson, who perfected the 
new Spoor-Thompson automatic proc- 
essing machine for the development 
and printing of films, at the instigation 
of George K. Spoor, president of Es- 
sanay. is not only an inventor, but an 
expert engineer and chemist. Knowl- 
edge of both were necessary in working 
out this process, as the work involved 
not only the construction of the ma- 
chines, which are forty feet in length and 
weigh fifteen tons each, but a thorough 
knowledge of the action of chemicals on 
films. 

Formerly With Edison 

With the Edison Company he was 
in charge of the Little Home pictures 
and later western manager for the talk- 
ing pictures. He went to Europe with 
Pathe to develop the technical end of 
the film work. 

Among his inventions is a water-proof- 
ing process on films. He was also a 
pioneer in color photography and the 
three process in photo-engraving. 

Mr. Thompson spent more than a year 
in experimental work on the Spoor- 
Thompson process before he had a prac- 
tical working machine. Since then he 
has constantly made improvements un- 
til the machine has reached its present 
stage of perfection. 

Machines of Great Worth 

These machines have not only prove 
their worth under the most exactin 
conditions, but are now turning out mi 
lions of feet of film of uniform, hig 
grade quality, film that is evenly proc 
essed in 1,000-foot lengths, witho 
flaws or imperfections. 



EXHIBITORS HERALD AND MO 



Four Men Indicted 
In Fire Prevention 
Bureau Graft Case 

New York Exhibitors Win in 
Fight to Stop Tribute 
Collecting 

NEW YORK.— The grand jury in- 
vestigating graft charges against the 
Fire Prevention Bureau and certain mo- 
tion picture theatres returned indict- 
ments against Dr. William P. Doyle, 
chief of the bureau; Captain Frank Mc- 
Ginnis, head of the Department of Pub- 
lic Assemblies of the bureau; Leon Wal- 
lace, a manager of Healy restaurant, 
land Frank McGoey of Far Rockaway, 
on charges of conspiracy and bribery. 

Captain McGinnis, Wallace, and Mc- 
Goey appeared before Judge Rosalsky in 
General Sessions to answer to the in- 
dictments. Wallace was released in $1,- 
000 bail and the others in $2,500 each. 
It was said that Dr. Doyle would appear 
today. 

Fire Commissioner Drennan, who had 
received complaints from several motion 
picture houses, referred them to the 
District Attorney with the evidence he 
had obtained. The indictments are based 
on allegations that certain favors were 
to be granted to motion picture houses 
in return for payments of various 
amounts, through the Colonial Film ex- 
change at 144 Columbus avenue. 

According to Assistant District Attor- 
ney Talley, this exchange sold no films 
and was used exclusively for collections, 
ranging from $10 to $25, and reaching a 
total of $1,500 weekly. 

N. A. M. P. I. Officials 

Enjoy Chicago Visit 

Officials of the N. A. M. P. I., who 
came to Chicago last Friday to attend 
a meeting of the Chicago censorship 
commission and express the views of the 
industry on the problem, remained in 
Chicago until Sunday, returning via the 
Twentieth Century. 

Friday noon they were entertained at 
luncheon at the Blackstone Hotel by 
Martin J. Quigley, publisher of the 
Herald and secretary of the censor- 
ship commission. Those present were 
William A. Brady, Walter W. Irwin, 
Paul H. Cromelin, Gabriel L. Hess, 
Peter J. Schaefer, Roy D. Keehn, and 
Arthur Ryan. 



Tippett in Country 

John D. Tippett, managing director 
of the Trans-Atlantic Film Co., Ltd. of 
London, has arrived in New York for a 
brief business visit prior to a visit to Uni- 
versal City, Cal., and returning abroad. 
Mr. Tippett is in charge of Universal's 
film distribution abroad and is in Amer- 
ica for the purpose of conferring with 
Carl Laemmle, president of the firm, and 
to arrange for great distribution of the 
Big U's productions in Europe and Africa 
during the present year. 



Wharton Feature 

The Wharton Brothers started work 
Monday on a new production, which it 
is expected will be ready within three 
months. 



Pennsylvania Buri 
Outlook Bright 

Theatre Men Win and 
Opening of Pictur 
Easter 

(Special to The Herald.) 

HARRISBURG, Pa.— The Judiciary 
Special Committee of the House of 
Representatives voted, 18 to 6, to report 
with a negative recommendation, the 
Rorke bill which would have amended 
the Blue Law of 1794 so as to permit 
the showing of motion pictures on Sun- 
days, in Pennsylvania. 

Thus vanished the hopes of the mo- 
tion picture industry which was prac- 
tically a unit behind the bill and which 
had made a vigorous fight for its pas- 
sage. It was in behalf of this measure 
that William A. Brady appeared in Har- 
risburg last week, in company of a num- 
ber of other prominent motion picture 
men, and argued before the committee 
for its adoption. 

The famous Philadelphia Orchestra 
gave three free public concerts at leg- 
islative hearings in three parts of the 
state to prove that the kind of music it 
played could not offend any one on the 
Sabbath. 

There is now no hope for the Rorke 
measure unless it should be voted on 
the floor of the House to revive it de- 
spite the committee's negative report, 
but such action is out of the realm of 
probability. 

Wins Point In New York 

ALBANY, N. Y.— The codes commit- 
tees of both branches of the Legisla- 
ture took favorable action on the Sun- 
day motion picture and Sunday baseball 
bills, by reporting them out of the com- 
mittees so that action may be taken on 
the floor. 

The Assembly committee, which had 
under consideration the bill introduced 
by Assemblyman Charles D. Donohue, 
the Democratic leader in the lower 
house providing for Sunday motion pic- 
tures, reported it out of committee, but 
decided to make amendments to the 
bill so that it would conform with Sen- 
ator George F. Thompson's bill, which 
was also reported favorably out of the 
Senate Codes Committee recently by 
a vote of 6 to 4. One member of 
the committee was absent, but desired 
that he be recorded in favor of the bill, 
which would make the vote seven to 
four. It appears that the provisions of 
the Sunday motion picture measure pre- 
pared by Senator Thompson was con- 
sidered more favorable than the similar 
bills prepared by Senator Foley and 
Assemblyman Donohue, and for that 
reason the Thompson bill was substi- 
tuted. The full text of Senator Thomp- 
son's bill follows: 

"If. in any citv, town or village, motion pic- 
tures are now exhibited on the first day of the 
week, they may continue to be so exhibited during 
such time after two o'clock in the afternoon as' the 
exhibition of motion pictures shall not have been 
prohibited by an ordinanc hereafter adonted by 
the common council or other legislative body of 
such city, town, or village, the adoption, repeal or 
rcadoption of which is hereby authorized. 

"If, in ally city, town or village, motion pic- 
tures are not now exhibited on the first day of the 
week, they shall not be so exhibited except during 
such time after two o'clock in the afternoon as 
shall be permitted by an ordinance hereafter 
adopted by the common council or other legisla- 



tions in the various municipalities. 

Mayor Charles P. Gillen, of Newark; 
Mayor George N. Seger, of Passaic, and 
Henry Hilfers, secretary of the State 
Federation of Labor, also spoke in favor 
of the bill. 

"The miner, who works in the bowels 
of the earth for six days a week," said 
Mr. Brady, "cannot be made to sit for 
any length of time on his porch, sucking 
his thumbs, because he has no place to 
go, while the wealthy man enjoys him- 
self in his automobile. The miner must 
have some sort of recreation." 

Mayor Gillen said ninety per cent of 
the residents of Newark want Sunday 
motion pictures and Mr. Hilfers said or- 
ganized labor also favors them. 

Prospect Bright in Ohio 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. — The bill in- 
troduced in the Ohio House of Repre- 
sentatives by the Ohio State Screen 
league, to make the showing of moving 
pictures on Sundays possible in all com- 
munities, through local option elections, 
scored considerable success the week 
ending March 29, when it was reported 
upon favorably by the Cities committee 
which was considering it, and went back 
to the house for an early vote. 

The vote on the bill is expected before 
April 10. If the house acts favorably, it 
has excellent chances of passing the 
senate. 

A big delegation of exhibitors from 
Cleveland, Toledo, Akron. Columbus, 
Dayton and Cincinnati will be in Colum- 
bus when the bill comes to a vote in the 
house of representatives. 



Injured Watching Parade 

Joe Blaisdell of the Winnipeg Film 
Exchange was injured while viewing the 
27th Division parade at 23rd Street, New 
York, by being caught in a jam which 
wedged him up against an iron railing, 
which resulted in two broken ribs. 



Beecroft Gets Comedies 

Chester Beecroft has just consum- 
mated a deal by which he is to handle 
the entire European rights on the Post 
Travel Series, said to be one of the 
best series of one reel comedies on the 
market today. 



27 



HERALD AND MOTOGRAPH Y 



Two scenes from the S. L. picture whi